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Treasure Hunters

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NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN STAFF | March 16, 1997
BEAUFORT, N.C. -- The crew stowed its plunder and raised the Jolly Roger in triumph, and skipper Walter Matheson set the wheel for home. It was a cold, bright day in November aboard the lumbering Pelican III, and a long quest had finally ended.Crew members believed they'd found the flagship of Blackbeard the pirate, the 40-gun Queen Anne's Revenge, buried on a sandbar in 20 feet of water two miles offshore. They'd felt it in their bones almost from the moment a diver emerged from the brown water to shout, "There's cannons down there!"
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EXPLORE
By Lane Page | October 27, 2011
What on earth was an 18th-century Chinese coin doing buried in a wooded patch of Columbia open space? Its finder, Rob La Luna, will probably never know. It's the most unexpected and surprising discovery he has made during his avocational hunts for missing metallica, including Civil War artifacts and other objects that in this section of the country could well go back far earlier. Still, around these parts, "the Civil War is everywhere," he says. We're no Antietam or Gettysburg, but, he says of the troops, "they'd camp for a day on the way somewhere else, or stay two months.
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NEWS
By Robert Lee and Robert Lee,Staff writer | February 26, 1991
"Bud" says his story is typical.The first time he tried it was back in 1972, lured by the promise of quick, easy money.Soon he found he was spending more and more money for bigger "beeps" and better highs. "Bud" soon abandoned all hope of ever breaking even. He fooled himself into believing that he was "just doing it torelax" or "to take his mind off of work."Twenty years later, "Bud" can be found most days wandering around a playground or hanging around in the shadows in the park "looking for something . . . anything."
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2011
Years ago, before we were married and moved to Maryland, my husband opened a checking account in Indiana and had the statements mailed to his office there. The account wasn't forgotten, just ignored. That wasn't a problem until his employer moved and the statements started bouncing back to the bank. Eventually, the account was turned over to the Indiana attorney general, who added it to a list of unclaimed property — where it was recently spotted by a family acquaintance. We put in a claim.
FEATURES
By ROBERT LLOYD and ROBERT LLOYD,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 17, 2006
Treasure Hunters, which premieres tomorrow night on NBC and moves to Mondays thereafter, is really no more than the globe-trotting CBS reality-competition series The Amazing Race dressed in the clothes of the 2004 Nicolas Cage action film National Treasure. That film was about a hoard of loot hidden by the Founding Fathers behind a series of Da Vinci Code-style firewalls, brain teasers and locked boxes, and though the resemblances may not be technically actionable, if the network legal department has done its job, they are close enough that we may reasonably imagine Jerry Bruckheimer - producer of both The Amazing Race and National Treasure, oddly - wondering just what is up with that.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | October 6, 2002
Barney Dolt, his right arm swinging like a pendulum and a bead of sweat dangling from his nose, searched for treasure yesterday morning along the shoreline of the Chesapeake Bay. Through earmuff-sized headphones, he heard his metal detector hit a tone that tells him he's found something. The 67-year-old Eldersburg resident deftly stooped to sift through the sand, and uncovered a coin. "Too many pennies," he grumbled as he tossed it into the basket strapped to his waist. But he can't complain too much - earlier that day, Dolt helped plant the coins in a cordoned-off area of the beach as big as a football field.
NEWS
By BRENT JONES and BRENT JONES,SUN REPORTER | May 29, 2006
A few hundred feet away from the Edgewater home of "Lil" John Reichenberg - one of the area's best-known metal-detector-using treasure hunters - a small beach rests on the shore of Glebe Creek. It is an inlet used more by neighborhood residents than outsiders, which is the reason why Reichenberg, 61, says it's been years since he has hunted there. Treasure lies buried in places where lots of people lose things, but this spot draws relatively few visitors, Reichenberg explains. But on this day in early May, Reichenberg decides he will put on a show, even though the chances of finding a prize, such as a gold ring, are low here.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | March 21, 2008
It sounds like the stuff of movies - including Fool's Gold, which is still in theaters - but there really are people who hunt for sunken treasure off the Florida coast and throughout the Caribbean Sea. In fact, a group of treasure hunters from Miami will set sail next week to salvage the Spanish galleon Concepcion somewhere off the coast of the Dominican Republic. Burt Webber Jr., who located the ship in 1978 and recovered $14 million in booty, is leading a 13-member crew that hopes to recover the rest of a treasure that could be valued as high as $100 million.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 3, 2005
"Aye, aye!" exclaimed Nicholas Paone as he swaggered aboard the ship. The 6-year-old swirled his sword in the air and snarled, "Arrrgh! I'll find the treasure, and then I'll be captain of this ship." Nicholas joined a six-person crew and 21 other young pretend marauders for the inaugural voyage of Treasure Hunters aboard the skipjack Martha Lewis in Havre de Grace. Designed as an educational outing for children, the narrated, two-hour trip combines Chesapeake Bay history and landmarks with rudimentary navigation to search for buried treasure.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | July 31, 1992
After a half century of disappointment and delay, a band of Southern California treasure hunters has launched a high-tech search for a hoard of gold they believe lies deep beneath a fissured limestone ridge on the White Sands Missile Range.With the help of ground radar, a miniature television camera and a global satellite positioning system, descendants of the late M. E. "Doc" Noss hope to establish once and for all whether he told the truth about stumbling across a cavern full of bullion inside Victorio Peak.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | March 21, 2008
It sounds like the stuff of movies - including Fool's Gold, which is still in theaters - but there really are people who hunt for sunken treasure off the Florida coast and throughout the Caribbean Sea. In fact, a group of treasure hunters from Miami will set sail next week to salvage the Spanish galleon Concepcion somewhere off the coast of the Dominican Republic. Burt Webber Jr., who located the ship in 1978 and recovered $14 million in booty, is leading a 13-member crew that hopes to recover the rest of a treasure that could be valued as high as $100 million.
FEATURES
By ROBERT LLOYD and ROBERT LLOYD,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 17, 2006
Treasure Hunters, which premieres tomorrow night on NBC and moves to Mondays thereafter, is really no more than the globe-trotting CBS reality-competition series The Amazing Race dressed in the clothes of the 2004 Nicolas Cage action film National Treasure. That film was about a hoard of loot hidden by the Founding Fathers behind a series of Da Vinci Code-style firewalls, brain teasers and locked boxes, and though the resemblances may not be technically actionable, if the network legal department has done its job, they are close enough that we may reasonably imagine Jerry Bruckheimer - producer of both The Amazing Race and National Treasure, oddly - wondering just what is up with that.
NEWS
By BRENT JONES and BRENT JONES,SUN REPORTER | May 29, 2006
A few hundred feet away from the Edgewater home of "Lil" John Reichenberg - one of the area's best-known metal-detector-using treasure hunters - a small beach rests on the shore of Glebe Creek. It is an inlet used more by neighborhood residents than outsiders, which is the reason why Reichenberg, 61, says it's been years since he has hunted there. Treasure lies buried in places where lots of people lose things, but this spot draws relatively few visitors, Reichenberg explains. But on this day in early May, Reichenberg decides he will put on a show, even though the chances of finding a prize, such as a gold ring, are low here.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 3, 2005
"Aye, aye!" exclaimed Nicholas Paone as he swaggered aboard the ship. The 6-year-old swirled his sword in the air and snarled, "Arrrgh! I'll find the treasure, and then I'll be captain of this ship." Nicholas joined a six-person crew and 21 other young pretend marauders for the inaugural voyage of Treasure Hunters aboard the skipjack Martha Lewis in Havre de Grace. Designed as an educational outing for children, the narrated, two-hour trip combines Chesapeake Bay history and landmarks with rudimentary navigation to search for buried treasure.
NEWS
By Hannah Mitchell and Hannah Mitchell,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | January 29, 2004
HIDDENITE, N.C. -- Jamie Hill is talking again about the emeralds he finds in the bedrock of this tiny town. He tells his story the way only he can. A thin hand drawn quickly through his tousled hair, he begins a long stream of consciousness that is hard to follow. The tangents are many, and Hill salts his monologue with fantastic claims and cliches: Hiddenite is a treasure chest, and he's found Aladdin's cave. "I say it's a giant oven in the earth," Hill says, referring to the pocket of crystals he and his assistants discovered beneath Hiddenite's gray gneiss rock.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | October 6, 2002
Barney Dolt, his right arm swinging like a pendulum and a bead of sweat dangling from his nose, searched for treasure yesterday morning along the shoreline of the Chesapeake Bay. Through earmuff-sized headphones, he heard his metal detector hit a tone that tells him he's found something. The 67-year-old Eldersburg resident deftly stooped to sift through the sand, and uncovered a coin. "Too many pennies," he grumbled as he tossed it into the basket strapped to his waist. But he can't complain too much - earlier that day, Dolt helped plant the coins in a cordoned-off area of the beach as big as a football field.
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and By Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | December 26, 2001
BEDFORD, VA. - Danny Johnson stands in his apple orchard overlooking the mountain ridges of this small southern Virginia town that have tempted and forsaken treasure hunters in search of secret pots of gold for more than a century. He shakes his head and laughs. He recalls one man who moved his neighbor's silo a few years ago to dig under it but ran out of money before he could put it back; the woman who was jailed for excavating parts of the town cemetery; and the two brothers who arrive on his doorstep each fall to dig more trenches between his apple trees.
NEWS
By Bonita Formwalt | September 23, 1992
Enjoy those killer potholes while you can, Glen Burnie. Once again they're threatening to resurrect "Superblock."Superblock, located directly behind the Arundel Center North, consists of five acres of stone, gravel, a tent full of plants and the souls of countless ruined front-end alignments.Suggested plans for the future include condominiums, offices and small stores. A meeting has been scheduled for 5 p.m. Sept. 28 at the Glen Burnie Improvement Association to solicit the community's opinions.
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and By Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | December 26, 2001
BEDFORD, VA. - Danny Johnson stands in his apple orchard overlooking the mountain ridges of this small southern Virginia town that have tempted and forsaken treasure hunters in search of secret pots of gold for more than a century. He shakes his head and laughs. He recalls one man who moved his neighbor's silo a few years ago to dig under it but ran out of money before he could put it back; the woman who was jailed for excavating parts of the town cemetery; and the two brothers who arrive on his doorstep each fall to dig more trenches between his apple trees.
NEWS
By Christina Bittner and Christina Bittner,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 19, 2000
MILLIONS OF YEARS ago, prehistoric creatures roamed throughout the state. Although these creatures are long gone, traces of their existence can still be found. At 2 p.m. Saturday, local treasure hunters Harry and Lee Biddinger and Jeff Strong will present objects from prehistoric Maryland at the Brooklyn Branch of the Enoch Pratt Free Library. Harry Biddinger has been hunting for prehistoric fossils in Maryland for two years. Most weekends, he and friends travel to Calvert Cliffs in Lusby to collect treasure.
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