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ENTERTAINMENT
By Shawn Langlois and Shawn Langlois,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | April 1, 2004
SAN FRANCISCO - The world's second-largest online travel agent just got a facelift. Travelocity (www.travelocity. com) shed its traditional light-colored look last month and replaced it with a darker hue and a new logo in an attempt to distinguish itself from competitors like leader Expedia and Orbitz. The fresh logo shows the company's name against a dark blue sky with hand-drawn stars, which represent "the traveler's natural compass," the company said. "Our goal in the redesign was to evolve the site based on the direct feedback of our customers," said Troy Whitsett, director of customer experience and interactive design for Travelocity, in a statement.
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BUSINESS
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | August 10, 2012
A number of travelers who booked a trip through Travelocity using an offer promoted by the Baltimore-based National Federation of the Blind have had their trips canceled for improperly claiming the discount. In early July, the federation sent out a message to its followers on Twitter noting that "Travelocity has offered NFB members $200 off a three-night hotel and flight package through September 4; use code NFB2012. " As can happen in the world of Internet promotions, with the code widely available online, some travelers took advantage of the deal even though they were not members of the NFB. On a Facebook page dedicated to the dispute, other travelers said they had joined the NFB — at-large membership is $10 — just to save money on their trip.
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BUSINESS
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | August 10, 2012
A number of travelers who booked a trip through Travelocity using an offer promoted by the Baltimore-based National Federation of the Blind have had their trips canceled for improperly claiming the discount. In early July, the federation sent out a message to its followers on Twitter noting that "Travelocity has offered NFB members $200 off a three-night hotel and flight package through September 4; use code NFB2012. " As can happen in the world of Internet promotions, with the code widely available online, some travelers took advantage of the deal even though they were not members of the NFB. On a Facebook page dedicated to the dispute, other travelers said they had joined the NFB — at-large membership is $10 — just to save money on their trip.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2011
Whether they're planning to travel to Italy, Tibet or Argentina, Larry and Bonnie Ohler call Lynda Maxwell first. Maxwell, the owner of Destinations Inc. travel agency, has been helping the Ellicott City couple plan vacations for years — booking tours, coordinating airport pickups, finding hotels and handling a myriad of other details. The Ohlers say they sometimes book parts of trips themselves, but not without Maxwell orchestrating it all from her office in Ellicott City. "We like the comfort of knowing someone who knows what they're doing is working for us," said Bonnie Ohler, who is retired.
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,Sun reporter | September 6, 2006
The Maryland Department of Tourism said yesterday that potential visitors now can book Travelocity deals for hotels, flights and other attractions through its Web site, part of an arrangement that the department hopes will help boost tourism and increase hotel bookings in the state. The tourism department and the online travel company have agreed that users will be able to make travel plans through a Travelocity tool on the tourism agency's Web site, www.visitmaryland.org. Travelocity will pay the state a commission for all travel plans made through the Maryland Web site, company and state officials said yesterday.
BUSINESS
By Jerry Hirsch and Jerry Hirsch,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 1, 2003
Travelers are finding that, in some instances, the less they know about the cost of a specific hotel or flight, the bigger the discount. That's because new services being offered by the large online travel companies reward consumers for bundling together typically separate hotel and air bookings rather than purchasing the components of a trip a la carte. Travelocity.com, the United States' second-largest online travel company, launched such a service yesterday, joining market leader Expedia Inc., which offers a similar program.
NEWS
April 18, 2010
Travelocity offers 40% off hotels to mark 40th Earth Day What's the deal? This week marks the 40th anniversary of Earth Day on Thursday. To mark the milestone, Travelocity if offering up to 40 percent off eco-friendly hotels across the globe. The sale highlights the top 40 green hotel deals, but also offers discounts off more than 75 participating hotels in the online travel agency's Green Hotel Directory. What are the savings? Varies depending on which hotel is selected, but guests can save about 20 percent to 40 percent off the average room rate, as calculated by Travelocity.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jane L. Levere and Jane L. Levere,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 8, 2004
Terrell B. Jones, the founder and former chief executive officer of Travelocity, usually books hotel rooms on Priceline.com for his business trips to New York. He has used the service six times since he left Travelocity in May 2002, paying about $120 a night to stay at the Melrose, the Roosevelt, the Hilton and the Grand Hyatt and $150 at the Waldorf-Astoria, not including taxes or service charges. Jones is one of a growing number of business travelers who reserve rooms on Priceline and its smaller rival, Hotwire.
TRAVEL
By CHRISTOPHER ELLIOTT and CHRISTOPHER ELLIOTT,NEW YORK TIMES | January 1, 2006
If Mary Ann Slater's 13-year-old stepdaughter, Alyssa, had missed her flight from El Paso, Texas, to New York last summer, she might have been forced to buy an expensive one-way ticket home and wait hours for the next plane. But that was before online travel agencies morphed into self-described "consumer champions." When Slater recently called Travelocity, the agency she booked her stepdaughter's tickets through, to tell them Alyssa hadn't made it to the airport on time, a call-center agent came to the rescue.
NEWS
By Michael Laris, The Washington Post | December 24, 2010
Tucked between two grain silos in the gray and white of winter is an old Maryland dairy barn spray-painted with monsters. There's a droopy-eyed Technicolor slug with fangs and horns and a catlike character with big teeth and plump Hollywood lips. The creatures are the first offspring of a rural street-art experiment launching from Montgomery County that intentionally avoids lovely country scenes and sunsets. The goal is to bring contemporary art to pastoral places by painting a barn in each Maryland county and pairing the artwork with poetry.
NEWS
By Michael Laris, The Washington Post | December 24, 2010
Tucked between two grain silos in the gray and white of winter is an old Maryland dairy barn spray-painted with monsters. There's a droopy-eyed Technicolor slug with fangs and horns and a catlike character with big teeth and plump Hollywood lips. The creatures are the first offspring of a rural street-art experiment launching from Montgomery County that intentionally avoids lovely country scenes and sunsets. The goal is to bring contemporary art to pastoral places by painting a barn in each Maryland county and pairing the artwork with poetry.
NEWS
April 18, 2010
Travelocity offers 40% off hotels to mark 40th Earth Day What's the deal? This week marks the 40th anniversary of Earth Day on Thursday. To mark the milestone, Travelocity if offering up to 40 percent off eco-friendly hotels across the globe. The sale highlights the top 40 green hotel deals, but also offers discounts off more than 75 participating hotels in the online travel agency's Green Hotel Directory. What are the savings? Varies depending on which hotel is selected, but guests can save about 20 percent to 40 percent off the average room rate, as calculated by Travelocity.
NEWS
By Brent Jones and Annie Linskey and Brent Jones and Annie Linskey,brent.jones@baltsun.com and annie.linskey@baltsun.com | December 11, 2008
Baltimore filed a federal lawsuit yesterday to recover $6 million in taxes that officials say are owed by online booking companies such as Travelocity, Orbitz, Expedia, Hotels.com and others. The lawsuit alleges that those companies provided hotel rooms to the public but failed to pay the room taxes. It also alleges that some companies did not inform their customers about the amount of their "service fees." But an official of the trade association that represents online booking companies said those businesses do not have to pay the room tax, which he said is paid by the hotels.
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,Sun reporter | September 6, 2006
The Maryland Department of Tourism said yesterday that potential visitors now can book Travelocity deals for hotels, flights and other attractions through its Web site, part of an arrangement that the department hopes will help boost tourism and increase hotel bookings in the state. The tourism department and the online travel company have agreed that users will be able to make travel plans through a Travelocity tool on the tourism agency's Web site, www.visitmaryland.org. Travelocity will pay the state a commission for all travel plans made through the Maryland Web site, company and state officials said yesterday.
TRAVEL
By CHRISTOPHER ELLIOTT and CHRISTOPHER ELLIOTT,NEW YORK TIMES | January 1, 2006
If Mary Ann Slater's 13-year-old stepdaughter, Alyssa, had missed her flight from El Paso, Texas, to New York last summer, she might have been forced to buy an expensive one-way ticket home and wait hours for the next plane. But that was before online travel agencies morphed into self-described "consumer champions." When Slater recently called Travelocity, the agency she booked her stepdaughter's tickets through, to tell them Alyssa hadn't made it to the airport on time, a call-center agent came to the rescue.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Shawn Langlois and Shawn Langlois,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | April 1, 2004
SAN FRANCISCO - The world's second-largest online travel agent just got a facelift. Travelocity (www.travelocity. com) shed its traditional light-colored look last month and replaced it with a darker hue and a new logo in an attempt to distinguish itself from competitors like leader Expedia and Orbitz. The fresh logo shows the company's name against a dark blue sky with hand-drawn stars, which represent "the traveler's natural compass," the company said. "Our goal in the redesign was to evolve the site based on the direct feedback of our customers," said Troy Whitsett, director of customer experience and interactive design for Travelocity, in a statement.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2011
Whether they're planning to travel to Italy, Tibet or Argentina, Larry and Bonnie Ohler call Lynda Maxwell first. Maxwell, the owner of Destinations Inc. travel agency, has been helping the Ellicott City couple plan vacations for years — booking tours, coordinating airport pickups, finding hotels and handling a myriad of other details. The Ohlers say they sometimes book parts of trips themselves, but not without Maxwell orchestrating it all from her office in Ellicott City. "We like the comfort of knowing someone who knows what they're doing is working for us," said Bonnie Ohler, who is retired.
NEWS
By Brent Jones and Annie Linskey and Brent Jones and Annie Linskey,brent.jones@baltsun.com and annie.linskey@baltsun.com | December 11, 2008
Baltimore filed a federal lawsuit yesterday to recover $6 million in taxes that officials say are owed by online booking companies such as Travelocity, Orbitz, Expedia, Hotels.com and others. The lawsuit alleges that those companies provided hotel rooms to the public but failed to pay the room taxes. It also alleges that some companies did not inform their customers about the amount of their "service fees." But an official of the trade association that represents online booking companies said those businesses do not have to pay the room tax, which he said is paid by the hotels.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jane L. Levere and Jane L. Levere,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 8, 2004
Terrell B. Jones, the founder and former chief executive officer of Travelocity, usually books hotel rooms on Priceline.com for his business trips to New York. He has used the service six times since he left Travelocity in May 2002, paying about $120 a night to stay at the Melrose, the Roosevelt, the Hilton and the Grand Hyatt and $150 at the Waldorf-Astoria, not including taxes or service charges. Jones is one of a growing number of business travelers who reserve rooms on Priceline and its smaller rival, Hotwire.
BUSINESS
By Jerry Hirsch and Jerry Hirsch,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 1, 2003
Travelers are finding that, in some instances, the less they know about the cost of a specific hotel or flight, the bigger the discount. That's because new services being offered by the large online travel companies reward consumers for bundling together typically separate hotel and air bookings rather than purchasing the components of a trip a la carte. Travelocity.com, the United States' second-largest online travel company, launched such a service yesterday, joining market leader Expedia Inc., which offers a similar program.
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