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By Karen Mardelli and Karen Mardelli,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | March 3, 1996
For golf lovers looking for information on travel destinations, the Equestrian Center/Show Place Arena in Upper Marlboro is the place to go. It will be the site of the sixth Annual Mid-Atlantic Golf and Travel Show March 8-10.All those attending the golf show who pay $1 per ball are eligible to qualify to swing for a $1 million hole. This event will raise money for the Nation's Capital Junior Golf Association, a nonprofit organization that helps youngsters pursue their interest golf. In addition, more than 200 vendors will be selling golf-related products.
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By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2013
Annapolis Shakespeare Company founder and artistic director Sally Boyett-D'Angelo is having a busy summer. She's presenting classic theater outdoors with weekly productions of Moliere's 17th-century comedy "Tartuffe" on Tuesdays at the Reynolds Tavern courtyard in downtown Annapolis. At the same time, she's rehearsing Shakespeare's "Much Ado About Nothing," which opens of the company's third season this Friday at Bowie Playhouse. A recent rehearsal at the troupe's Chinquapin Round Road studio showed why, under Boyett-D'Angelo's guidance, "Much Ado" is both engaging and comic.
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By Victor Paul Alvarez and Victor Paul Alvarez,Contributing Writer | September 30, 1994
After just two days in town, the cast and crew of a British television travel program are saying that people in Baltimore are friendly, helpful and proud.The city's Chesapeake Bay, panhandlers (a reminder of London) and penchant for mispronouncing Thames -- for them, it's "tems" -- Street charmed the cast and crew of the "Wish You Were Here?" travel show.After arriving Wednesday night and soaking up a bit of city life around Pratt Street, the crew spent yesterday filming portions of an upcoming program on the Washington, Baltimore and Annapolis area.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2012
The very last episode of Anthony Bourdain's "No Reservations" will offer a taste of both New York and Baltimore. The Baltimore flavor will come by way of "The Wire. "  As the Los Angeles Times puts it, Bourdain has frequently "geeked out" about "The Wire" and welcomed any number of its actors onto his food-oriented travel show. David Simon has been on, as has Felicia "Snoop" Pearson. Bourdain has also done some writing for Simon's other HBO project, "Treme. " In the final Travel Channel episode of "No Reservations" that airs Nov. 5,  the actor who played Omar, Michael K. Williams, shows Bourdain one of his favorite spots in New York for Caribbean, a place called Gloria's in Crown Heights.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2012
Friday Update : Filming is going to be delayed until further notice, Spike TV spokesman Salil Gulati said. Another nightlife cable show is coming to Baltimore. After IFC's " Young, Broke & Beautiful " and HDNet's " Drinking Made Easy ," the Spike TV show "Bar Rescue" will film at Fells Point's J.A. Murphy's this week. The show, a kind of "Kitchen Nightmares" for bars, helps upgrade "failing establishments. " Host Jon Taffer, a restaurant and bar consultant who has an "in-your-face style and renowned method of management called "Taffer Dynamics," gets involved with every aspect of a bar's business -  menus, interior design, staff -  to "transform outmoded bars into vibrant, profitable establishments," according to a press release from the network.
ENTERTAINMENT
by Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2012
Baltimore's hidden global cuisine will be featured on Friday night's installment of the Cooking Channel's culinary travel show "Eden Eats. " On Friday's episode, which airs at 10 p.m., host Eden Grinshpan will have 24 hours in Baltimore to "eat her way around the globe. "  In and around Baltimore, Grinshpan will be shown having lunch at a Kenyan restaurant, making dinner with two Ukrainian sisters, sampling Newari specialties at a Nepalese restaurant, snacking on Lithuanian food, visiting a Bavarian chocolatier, taking breakfast at a Peruvian restaurant and, finally, rejuvenating herself with some Nigerian bitter leaf soup.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2012
The very last episode of Anthony Bourdain's "No Reservations" will offer a taste of both New York and Baltimore. The Baltimore flavor will come by way of "The Wire. "  As the Los Angeles Times puts it, Bourdain has frequently "geeked out" about "The Wire" and welcomed any number of its actors onto his food-oriented travel show. David Simon has been on, as has Felicia "Snoop" Pearson. Bourdain has also done some writing for Simon's other HBO project, "Treme. " In the final Travel Channel episode of "No Reservations" that airs Nov. 5,  the actor who played Omar, Michael K. Williams, shows Bourdain one of his favorite spots in New York for Caribbean, a place called Gloria's in Crown Heights.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | December 5, 2011
When Zane Lamprey travels, his version of sightseeing involves barhopping and trying out the local specialties in beer and cocktails. Lamprey is the host of "Drinking Made Easy," a travel show on HDNet that does for bar crawls what Anthony Bourdain's "No Reservations" did for dining and Brooke Burke's "Wild On!" did for international partying. In each episode, Lamprey explores the drinking traditions of an American city, and in an episode that airs Wednesday, he finally explores Baltimore, where he visits Abbey Burger Bistro and Mr. Rain's Fun House, among others.
NEWS
April 6, 1995
After touring Washington, Alexandria and Laurel, Redskins owner Jack Kent Cooke appears ready to pull up stakes and take his traveling circus of lawyers, public relations flacks and architects on the road again. The octogenarian billionaire says he has all but given up on his plan to build a football stadium in Laurel in Anne Arundel County and wonders aloud if the perfect place wouldn't be Prince George's County.The news isn't completely surprising. Mr. Cooke has been battling public opposition in Laurel for more than a year, and last fall Anne Arundel's Administrative Hearing Officer Robert C. Wilcox refused to grant the zoning waiver Mr. Cooke needed to build the stadium at the Laurel Race Course site.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,ed.gunts@baltsun.com | April 12, 2009
For 27 years, Baltimore's Artscape festival typically has presented art exhibits for a brief period, and then the art disappears from public view. But one exhibit has taken on a life of its own, finding new audiences long after the initial show ended. Alphabet: An Exhibition of Hand-Drawn Lettering and Experimental Topography was one of numerous shows organized for the 2005 Artscape festival. It featured 60 ways to draw the alphabet, as conceived by 47 artists. But after Artscape ended that year, the city's arts agency began receiving requests to present the Alphabet show in other settings - at art schools, graphic designers' meetings, galleries and elsewhere around the country.
ENTERTAINMENT
by Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2012
Baltimore's hidden global cuisine will be featured on Friday night's installment of the Cooking Channel's culinary travel show "Eden Eats. " On Friday's episode, which airs at 10 p.m., host Eden Grinshpan will have 24 hours in Baltimore to "eat her way around the globe. "  In and around Baltimore, Grinshpan will be shown having lunch at a Kenyan restaurant, making dinner with two Ukrainian sisters, sampling Newari specialties at a Nepalese restaurant, snacking on Lithuanian food, visiting a Bavarian chocolatier, taking breakfast at a Peruvian restaurant and, finally, rejuvenating herself with some Nigerian bitter leaf soup.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2012
Friday Update : Filming is going to be delayed until further notice, Spike TV spokesman Salil Gulati said. Another nightlife cable show is coming to Baltimore. After IFC's " Young, Broke & Beautiful " and HDNet's " Drinking Made Easy ," the Spike TV show "Bar Rescue" will film at Fells Point's J.A. Murphy's this week. The show, a kind of "Kitchen Nightmares" for bars, helps upgrade "failing establishments. " Host Jon Taffer, a restaurant and bar consultant who has an "in-your-face style and renowned method of management called "Taffer Dynamics," gets involved with every aspect of a bar's business -  menus, interior design, staff -  to "transform outmoded bars into vibrant, profitable establishments," according to a press release from the network.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | December 5, 2011
When Zane Lamprey travels, his version of sightseeing involves barhopping and trying out the local specialties in beer and cocktails. Lamprey is the host of "Drinking Made Easy," a travel show on HDNet that does for bar crawls what Anthony Bourdain's "No Reservations" did for dining and Brooke Burke's "Wild On!" did for international partying. In each episode, Lamprey explores the drinking traditions of an American city, and in an episode that airs Wednesday, he finally explores Baltimore, where he visits Abbey Burger Bistro and Mr. Rain's Fun House, among others.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,ed.gunts@baltsun.com | April 12, 2009
For 27 years, Baltimore's Artscape festival typically has presented art exhibits for a brief period, and then the art disappears from public view. But one exhibit has taken on a life of its own, finding new audiences long after the initial show ended. Alphabet: An Exhibition of Hand-Drawn Lettering and Experimental Topography was one of numerous shows organized for the 2005 Artscape festival. It featured 60 ways to draw the alphabet, as conceived by 47 artists. But after Artscape ended that year, the city's arts agency began receiving requests to present the Alphabet show in other settings - at art schools, graphic designers' meetings, galleries and elsewhere around the country.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | September 30, 2004
For years, Baltimore photographer Neil Meyerhoff has regularly visited Latin America and Asia to produce extensive travelogues of such countries as Cuba and Japan. Now a new exhibition at C. Grimaldis Gallery showcases his latest pictures from Laos and Mexico. Meyerhoff uses a miniature 35 mm panoramic camera, the Hasselblad XPan, to create eye-popping wide-angle images of colorful street scenes and odd incidents from the everyday lives of people whose experience, culture and history are quite different from our own. By now, he has developed such a facile technique and fine eye for color and composition that his photographs make the pictorial challenges of the extreme wide-angle format - and the pitfalls of color film - almost look easy.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 14, 2003
WASHINGTON - Chances are, you've never heard of culturally essential Americans such as Enid Bissett, Orla Watson and Earl C. Tupper. Their genius will be on display in a new traveling Smithsonian Institution exhibition of sketches, patent illustrations and factory drawings for products that shaped the nation in profound but humble ways. Take Charles Brannock of Syracuse, N.Y., the inventor of the Brannock Device. You know it as the shoe-store gizmo that measures foot length and width.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | October 23, 1994
Horace Pippin was a self-taught African-American artist who gained widespread fame in his brief career earlier this century, then sank into relative obscurity after his premature death. Now he is being noticed again, thanks to a show that opens Wednesday at the Baltimore Museum of Art.Pippin didn't finish his first important painting until 1930, at age 42, and didn't have his first exhibition until 1937. He died in 1946. In that relatively short period of time, however, he shot to national prominence, with major shows in Philadelphia, New York, Chicago and San Francisco.
FEATURES
By Linda Lowe Morris | November 2, 1991
Memo to local skiers: The season is just beginning. That's the message being delivered at the seventh annual Baltimore Ski and Travel Show.At the show, which started yesterday and continues today and tomorrow at Festival Hall, ski enthusiasts from novice to expert will find opportunities to watch world champion skiers and in-line skaters. They can get information as well as bargains on equipment and fashions. And they will even have a chance to put on skis and tackle a 65-foot indoor ski slope, get tips on technique, and compete on a revolving deck for prizes.
NEWS
By Betsy Diehl and Betsy Diehl,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 15, 2002
TO EXCITE a molecule, introduce heat. To excite a gymnasium full of schoolchildren, introduce a couple of comedic scientists from the Maryland Science Center's Traveling Science Program. "It's our job to get you excited about science!" proclaimed Nicole Hord to third-, fourth- and fifth-graders at Hammond Elementary School on Monday morning. She and colleague Debbie Bell, both educators for the Maryland Science Center's educational outreach program, lived up to their word with two chemistry presentations at the school called "What's the Matter?"
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | December 5, 2000
In "Jesus 2000," a traveling art exhibit, Christ is depicted as an African-American woman with dreadlocks, as a smiling convict hours after his execution for murder, as a television anchorman mouthing "I am the news," as a rock 'n' roll star with a strong resemblance to one of the Bee Gees, and a blindfolded figure holding infants from a throne over a fiery hell. Those images and many others are on display in Marriottsville, the result of a competition to create a millennium Jesus - or a depiction of what, in the minds of artists, Jesus Christ might look like if he were alive today.
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