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By New York Times News Service | September 8, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Federal investigators have found evidence that the former head of the White House travel office deposited money that news organizations paid for presidential trips into his own bank account and may have diverted some of it to his personal use, law-enforcement officials said yesterday.About $55,000 in news media money was deposited into the bank account of the former official, Billy R. Dale, from 1988 to 1991, the officials said, referring to a review of Mr. Dale's bank records.
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NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Susan Baer and Jonathan Weisman and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 19, 1998
WASHINGTON -- In 58 pages of blistering testimony, independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr plans to lay out the widest possible range of presidential misconduct in the Monica Lewinsky matter today, arguing that President Clinton engaged in a "pattern of obstruction" that is "fundamentally inconsistent" with his "duty to faithfully execute the law."Starr's testimony, obtained last night, will be the first order of business in the second presidential impeachment hearings of this century.Before the House Judiciary Committee, Starr will present a case that seems at times politically devastating, at other times banal.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 3, 1994
WASHINGTON -- A senior White House official said Hillary Rodham Clinton urged him last year to replace members of the travel office with "our people," congressional investigators reported yesterday.The report by the General Accounting Office, a nonpartisan investigative arm of Congress, goes significantly beyond a White House review last July of the dismissal of all seven employees of the travel office on May 19. The new account depicts Mrs. Clinton as playing a more active role in the dismissals after the White House accused the workers of mismanagement.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 19, 1996
WASHINGTON -- With Democratic members staging a walkout, a Republican-controlled House committee yesterday formally accused President Clinton of directing a widespread cover-up of the 1993 White House travel office firings, including his wife's role in it.At a stormy session at which members of the House Government Reform and Oversight Committee tried to out-shout one another, Democrats accused the panel's chairman, Rep. William F. Clinger Jr., of abusing...
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 2, 1993
WASHINGTON -- White House officials said yesterday that the internal review of their handling of the travel office affair, which is to be made public today, outlined a series of management errors on the part of aides but did not recommend any dismissals or job transfers.Also yesterday, officials of the Federal Bureau of Investigation said its investigation had turned up no evidence of criminal behavior by the seven members of the White House travel office who were summarily dismissed after accusations of mismanagement.
NEWS
May 12, 1996
THE WHITE HOUSE is intent on shutting the gate on Whitewatergate and Travelgate, and so far it has been successful.Despite three years of Republican attempts to make a politically devastating scandal out of these affairs, President Clinton is riding serenely on a 20-point lead over challenger Bob Dole. Other polls indicate voters do not consider Whitewater important by a double-digit margin. The firing of holdover employees of the White House Travel Office probably ranks even lower in public esteem.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 3, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The White House issued a strikingly self-critical report yesterday that faulted the behavior of one of its authors and rebuked four other officials for the dismissals of the White House travel staff last May.The four were reprimanded for improperly dismissing the staff members, for appearing to pressure the FBI and for permitting a friend of President Clinton's to become involved in a matter in which he had a financial stake.The 80-page report on the travel office affair, which paralyzed Mr. Clinton's staff for a week in May, also disclosed that Hillary Rodham Clinton had taken a personal interest in accusations of mismanagement at the office, which handles the itineraries of White House officials and the White House press corps.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF Sun staff writer Carl M. Cannon contributed to this article | March 23, 1996
WASHINGTON - The Whitewater independent counsel was authorized yesterday to expand his investigation to include whether a former administration official lied about Hillary Rodham Clinton's alleged role in the 1993 firing of White House travel office employees.The broadened scope of the investigation was granted by a three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals at the request of Attorney General Janet Reno. It allows the independent counsel to review the travel office affair a matter separate from the Whitewater land deal and the first lady's involvement in the firing of seven career employees.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 19, 1996
WASHINGTON -- With Democratic members staging a walkout, a Republican-controlled House committee yesterday formally accused President Clinton of directing a widespread cover-up of the 1993 White House travel office firings, including his wife's role in it.At a stormy session at which members of the House Government Reform and Oversight Committee tried to out-shout one another, Democrats accused the panel's chairman, Rep. William F. Clinger Jr., of abusing...
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 6, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Seven months after Billy Dale was abruptly fired as head of the White House travel office and while he was already under investigation by the Justice Department, the Clinton administration requested his confidential background files from the FBI.Rep. William F. Clinger Jr., a Pennsylvania Republican who is investigating the 1993 firing of the travel office employees, asserted yesterday that the request showed that the White House was "bent on destroying an innocent man" and misused the FBI to do so.The request to the FBI -- a document that was among 1,000 pages turned over to a congressional committee last week -- was dated Dec. 20, 1993, seven months after Dale was dismissed and was no longer a federal employee.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 6, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Seven months after Billy Dale was abruptly fired as head of the White House travel office and while he was already under investigation by the Justice Department, the Clinton administration requested his confidential background files from the FBI.Rep. William F. Clinger Jr., a Pennsylvania Republican who is investigating the 1993 firing of the travel office employees, asserted yesterday that the request showed that the White House was "bent on destroying an innocent man" and misused the FBI to do so.The request to the FBI -- a document that was among 1,000 pages turned over to a congressional committee last week -- was dated Dec. 20, 1993, seven months after Dale was dismissed and was no longer a federal employee.
NEWS
May 12, 1996
THE WHITE HOUSE is intent on shutting the gate on Whitewatergate and Travelgate, and so far it has been successful.Despite three years of Republican attempts to make a politically devastating scandal out of these affairs, President Clinton is riding serenely on a 20-point lead over challenger Bob Dole. Other polls indicate voters do not consider Whitewater important by a double-digit margin. The firing of holdover employees of the White House Travel Office probably ranks even lower in public esteem.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 10, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Decrying the Clinton administration's "culture of secrecy," the House committee investigating the White House travel office firings voted yesterday to bring criminal contempt of Congress charges against current and former White House aides for refusing to turn over requested documents.The 27-19 party-line vote came after the committee was informed that President Clinton would invoke executive privilege to protect the bulk of travel office documents not previously turned over to the panel.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF Sun staff writer Carl M. Cannon contributed to this article | March 23, 1996
WASHINGTON - The Whitewater independent counsel was authorized yesterday to expand his investigation to include whether a former administration official lied about Hillary Rodham Clinton's alleged role in the 1993 firing of White House travel office employees.The broadened scope of the investigation was granted by a three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals at the request of Attorney General Janet Reno. It allows the independent counsel to review the travel office affair a matter separate from the Whitewater land deal and the first lady's involvement in the firing of seven career employees.
NEWS
By Rick Horowitz | January 25, 1996
OPTION NO. 1: The Creepy. She goes to the grand jury and swears she had nothing to do with it. Law-firm billing records eluding searchers for years? Records suddenly turning up in the White House living quarters?''I'm just as surprised as you are,'' she tells them. ''It must have been some sinister force.''Can she do The Creepy? She can do The Creepy, but it's risky. She's not the only one being subpoenaed. Somebody else might know something. Somebody else might know that she knows something.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 19, 1996
CLINTON, Md. -- Inside a modest split-foyer home, Billy Dale's phone rings constantly, his wife tends alternately to their baby granddaughter and her husband's legal documents, and Mr. Dale narrates his travails at the hands of Bill and Hillary Rodham Clinton.These are the sights and sounds of vindication.Mr. Dale, who served in the administrations of eight presidents, speaks softly and with more hurt than bitterness.Nonetheless, his words have stung the administration that fired him, prosecuted him and continues to malign him and the job he performed as head of the White House travel office.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 18, 1996
WASHINGTON -- The presidential aide who fired the White rTC House travel office staff in 1993 said yesterday that Hillary Rodham Clinton did not order his actions. But newly released documents suggest that the first lady expressed to him the need to get "those people out" and "our people in."The former White House official, David Watkins, told a House committee investigating the "Travelgate" affair that he stood by a "soul-cleansing" memo he wrote -- that has undercut the first lady's credibility since its discovery two weeks ago -- in which he warned there would be "hell to pay" if he failed to abide by Mrs. Clinton's wishes.
NEWS
July 8, 1993
After "investigating" its own purge of the White House travel office, the Clinton administration has decided it "did the right thing but did it in the wrong way." They're half right, anyway.They certainly did it in the wrong way. But we can't agree they did the right thing.The undisputed facts are that seven civil servants were publicly fired amid broad insinuations of corrupt conduct without substantial evidence, at the behest of relatives and cronies of President Clinton with clear conflicts of interest.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 18, 1996
WASHINGTON -- The presidential aide who fired the White rTC House travel office staff in 1993 said yesterday that Hillary Rodham Clinton did not order his actions. But newly released documents suggest that the first lady expressed to him the need to get "those people out" and "our people in."The former White House official, David Watkins, told a House committee investigating the "Travelgate" affair that he stood by a "soul-cleansing" memo he wrote -- that has undercut the first lady's credibility since its discovery two weeks ago -- in which he warned there would be "hell to pay" if he failed to abide by Mrs. Clinton's wishes.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 5, 1996
WASHINGTON -- A memo by a former presidential aide depicts Hillary Rodham Clinton as the central figure in the 1993 travel office dismissals, a politically damaging episode that the aide said resulted from a climate of fear in which officials did not dare question her wishes.The newly released draft memo, written by David Watkins, the former top administrative aide at the White House, also sharply contradicts the White House's official account of Mrs. Clinton as merely an interested observer in the events that led to the dismissal of the White House travel staff and its replacement with Clinton associates from Arkansas.
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