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TRAVEL
By Los Angeles Times | March 2, 2008
A friend recently told me that she never travels without a can of Lysol because she does not think that hotels do a thorough job of disinfecting after each guest. Then I began to wonder: Can you take a can of Lysol in your suitcase? If not, what can she do? Alas, your friend's Lysol won't be leaving on a jet plane. You can travel with it, just not on an airplane. "Lysol is a flammable aerosol and therefore cannot be brought onto a commercial aircraft by passengers or crew," Ian Gregor, a spokesman for the Federal Aviation Administration, wrote in an e-mail.
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FEATURES
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,Sun reporter | June 19, 2008
No matter the destination, travelers often come home with more than pictures and T-shirts. They pick up a malady - a cold or a stomach ailment, or worse. But as the summer travel season gets under way, those in the business of keeping people healthy say good planning and some vigilance can increase the odds of keeping illness at bay. They say that for most people traveling domestically by car, train or plane, the most important steps to staying healthy - or at least reducing the severity of a cold - are simple.
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NEWS
July 1, 2002
Burrill leaving Leadership Howard County Shirley M. Burrill, executive director of Leadership Howard County, has announced that she will step down Oct. 31. Burrill was instrumental in formulating the organization's mission to strengthen and improve the community by providing knowledgeable, effective leaders for community organizations. The program now enrolls more than 40 students each year. Burrill was recognized as Volunteer Educator of the Year in 1991. Warfield's Daily Record named her one of Maryland's Top 100 Women in 1997, 1999 and this year.
TRAVEL
By Los Angeles Times | March 2, 2008
A friend recently told me that she never travels without a can of Lysol because she does not think that hotels do a thorough job of disinfecting after each guest. Then I began to wonder: Can you take a can of Lysol in your suitcase? If not, what can she do? Alas, your friend's Lysol won't be leaving on a jet plane. You can travel with it, just not on an airplane. "Lysol is a flammable aerosol and therefore cannot be brought onto a commercial aircraft by passengers or crew," Ian Gregor, a spokesman for the Federal Aviation Administration, wrote in an e-mail.
TRAVEL
By KATHLEEN DOHENY and KATHLEEN DOHENY,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 16, 2006
Every year, about 1,300 people in the United States learn they have malaria. Most are travelers, and many are blasM-i about malaria. If they had taken antimalarial pills as directed - before, during and after the trip - and followed simple precautions, they would have greatly reduced the risk of getting the mosquito-transmitted disease. Worldwide, malaria affects up to 500 million people a year; 1 million die of the disease annually. It is endemic in more than 100 countries and territories, according to the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | August 19, 2003
What happens to a franchise travel inoculation business when travel drops off? It redefines its business and keeps growing. At least, that's what happened to Baltimore-based Passport Health. In the wake of the terrorist attacks on the Pentagon and World Trade Center two years ago, travel business has slipped. Passport made up for it with inoculations related to war and terror rather than travel, such as for called-up military reservists and for post office workers potentially exposed to anthrax.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN STAFF | August 3, 2003
Ready for the vacation of a lifetime? Pack your swimsuit and your dancing shoes. And don't forget the ibuprofen, cough medicine, decongestant, antibiotic ointment, seasick medicine, anti-diarrheal, antihistamines, antacid, aspirin, Larium for malaria and EpiPen, an emergency injection of epinephrine for severe allergic reactions. Because chances are you're going to get sick on your vacation. Even getting there and back can be hazardous to your health. Maryann DellaRocco, 33, developed vertigo coming back from a trip to the Bahamas.
NEWS
By KAREN BLUM and KAREN BLUM,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 6, 2006
Although hand-washing can prevent the spread of intestinal viruses onboard a cruise, there are other health hazards that travelers can avoid. First, a cruise may be an escape from day-to-day life, but you can't leave chronic illness behind, says Dr. Nelson Tang of Johns Hopkins Hospital's emergency department. "People ignore or discount medical conditions while on vacation to get away from it all," says Tang, a former consultant to Renaissance Cruises. Bring any daily medications with you, he says, and tell the onboard medical staff about any unusual needs.
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert | April 27, 2007
There are travelers, and then there are adventurers. Dr. Michael P. Zimring of Ellicott City is definitely the latter. "I want to be on a small boat, not a big one," he said. "I want to be in jeans and boots, not a tuxedo. And I want to eat healthy food, not the junk -- the cakes and the ice cream and all that stuff they serve you on cruise ships." How serendipitous that Zimring focuses on such travelers in his profession as internist and medical director of the Center for Wilderness and Travel Medicine at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore.
TRAVEL
By Ulysses Torassa and By Ulysses Torassa,SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE | January 19, 2003
One of the most important items in your luggage is something that, with luck, you'll never have to use: a basic medical kit to handle common illnesses and emergencies. Whether it's a two-week holiday in Paris or a three-month trek through South America, a smart traveler goes prepared. The contents of a first-aid kit might vary depending on destination, length of stay and your own medical history, but even for relatively mundane trips, it makes sense to pack some supplies to relieve symptoms and take care of minor scrapes when you're far from home.
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert | April 27, 2007
There are travelers, and then there are adventurers. Dr. Michael P. Zimring of Ellicott City is definitely the latter. "I want to be on a small boat, not a big one," he said. "I want to be in jeans and boots, not a tuxedo. And I want to eat healthy food, not the junk -- the cakes and the ice cream and all that stuff they serve you on cruise ships." How serendipitous that Zimring focuses on such travelers in his profession as internist and medical director of the Center for Wilderness and Travel Medicine at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore.
TRAVEL
By KATHLEEN DOHENY and KATHLEEN DOHENY,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 16, 2006
Every year, about 1,300 people in the United States learn they have malaria. Most are travelers, and many are blasM-i about malaria. If they had taken antimalarial pills as directed - before, during and after the trip - and followed simple precautions, they would have greatly reduced the risk of getting the mosquito-transmitted disease. Worldwide, malaria affects up to 500 million people a year; 1 million die of the disease annually. It is endemic in more than 100 countries and territories, according to the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta.
NEWS
By KAREN BLUM and KAREN BLUM,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 6, 2006
Although hand-washing can prevent the spread of intestinal viruses onboard a cruise, there are other health hazards that travelers can avoid. First, a cruise may be an escape from day-to-day life, but you can't leave chronic illness behind, says Dr. Nelson Tang of Johns Hopkins Hospital's emergency department. "People ignore or discount medical conditions while on vacation to get away from it all," says Tang, a former consultant to Renaissance Cruises. Bring any daily medications with you, he says, and tell the onboard medical staff about any unusual needs.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | June 28, 2004
The Presidential Commission on Space Exploration Policy At Vandenberg Air Force Base in California, technicians are busy preparing Aura -- NASA's $800 million atmospheric research satellite -- for a July 10 launch. It's been a long time coming. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration conceived the mission 18 years ago. The Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt awarded the Aura contract a decade ago. And Northrop Grumman Space Technologies began building the spacecraft three years ago. Fast enough for the old NASA, perhaps.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | August 19, 2003
What happens to a franchise travel inoculation business when travel drops off? It redefines its business and keeps growing. At least, that's what happened to Baltimore-based Passport Health. In the wake of the terrorist attacks on the Pentagon and World Trade Center two years ago, travel business has slipped. Passport made up for it with inoculations related to war and terror rather than travel, such as for called-up military reservists and for post office workers potentially exposed to anthrax.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN STAFF | August 3, 2003
Ready for the vacation of a lifetime? Pack your swimsuit and your dancing shoes. And don't forget the ibuprofen, cough medicine, decongestant, antibiotic ointment, seasick medicine, anti-diarrheal, antihistamines, antacid, aspirin, Larium for malaria and EpiPen, an emergency injection of epinephrine for severe allergic reactions. Because chances are you're going to get sick on your vacation. Even getting there and back can be hazardous to your health. Maryann DellaRocco, 33, developed vertigo coming back from a trip to the Bahamas.
FEATURES
By Alyssa Gabbay and Alyssa Gabbay,American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists | August 13, 1991
When David Freeman woke up in the middle of the night during a two-week trip to Mexico last month, he knew something was wrong. He felt nauseated and his stomach was making loud rumbling noises.He managed to ward off illness by taking an antibiotic prescribed by a travel clinic before he left. But even this bit of preparation didn't keep Montezuma's Revenge, also known as traveler's diarrhea, from striking a week or so later."It was just like someone turned a hose on inside of you,recalled Mr. Freeman, a 27-year-old, systems programmer from Arnold who had traveled to Ometepec to help build a church.
TRAVEL
By Ulysses Torassa and By Ulysses Torassa,SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE | January 19, 2003
One of the most important items in your luggage is something that, with luck, you'll never have to use: a basic medical kit to handle common illnesses and emergencies. Whether it's a two-week holiday in Paris or a three-month trek through South America, a smart traveler goes prepared. The contents of a first-aid kit might vary depending on destination, length of stay and your own medical history, but even for relatively mundane trips, it makes sense to pack some supplies to relieve symptoms and take care of minor scrapes when you're far from home.
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