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BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose and Eileen Ambrose,Sun Columnist | July 8, 2007
We see terrorist attacks at airports, record airline delays and bankruptcies among travel providers. No wonder people are buying so much travel insurance. But is all that spending - $1.3 billion last year, at least twice the annual figures before Sept. 11, 2001 - worth it? Not necessarily. You may have coverage for some of your travel concerns. And considering that the typical policy runs 4 percent to 8 percent of the cost of your trip, that can be a sizable sum to buy what you already have.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2014
John H. Tierney, former head of the Travelers Insurance Co.'s Baltimore engineering department and a World War II veteran, died Feb. 24 of complications from a stroke at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. He was 90. The son of Edward Tierney, a chauffeur, and Elizabeth Murphy Tierney, a homemaker, John Henry Tierney was born and raised in Fairfield, Conn., where he graduated in 1941 from Roger Ludlowe High School. He was a graduate of the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy at Kings Point, N.Y., and served in engine rooms aboard merchant marine vessels.
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TRAVEL
By Alfred Borcover and Alfred Borcover,Chicago Tribune | September 28, 2003
Since 9 / 11, travelers have become a lot more savvy about buying travel insurance to protect their vacation investments, giving themselves some peace of mind in today's uncertain world. And third-party travel-insurance companies have become a lot smarter, tweaking their coverage to reflect what happened to travel post-9 / 11. The changes added by insurance companies focus mainly on defining acts of terrorism. Prior to 9 / 11, terrorism coverage included only incidents overseas. Now it includes terrorism on U.S. soil.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2010
Visions of the Iceland volcano spewing ash into the air and weary, grounded travelers waiting it out at airports are causing more people to consider travel insurance. Insurers and agents say queries about policies to protect against flight cancellations and delays are sky- high. InsureMyTrip.com, which compares and sells policies, received its second-highest number of calls during the week of April 19th, days after Eyjafjallajokull erupted. (The busiest week for the 10-year-old site was after the swine flu outbreak in August.
FEATURES
By Jean Allen and Jean Allen,SUN SENTINEL | October 26, 1997
I am under a doctor's care for a serious treatment that will not end until after the date of my scheduled flight on United Airlines. I have a doctor's letter attesting to this fact. However, a United agent claims the airline is under no obligation to change the date of travel.I thought there was a federal law that if a passenger is unable to travel, the airline must grant the request for a date change.There is no federal law requiring airlines to change dates on restricted tickets like yours at no extra charge, even for people who can't fly on the original date for medical reasons.
TRAVEL
By MICHELLE DEAL-ZIMMERMAN and MICHELLE DEAL-ZIMMERMAN,michelle.deal@baltsun.com, twitter.com/suntravelblog | March 29, 2009
Vacations are supposed to be good for your health, but what happens when you face a medical emergency in the middle of a trip? In Natasha Richardson's tragic case, a fall on a beginner's slope at a Canadian ski resort was deadly. But many other vacationers have suffered heart attacks, strokes, car crashes or other accidental injuries. Last month, several cruise passengers on an excursion in the Caribbean were seriously hurt when the bus they were riding in lost control and veered into a ditch.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Higgins and Michelle Higgins,New York Times News Service | May 13, 2007
As summer approaches and travelers plunk down nonrefundable deposits to secure their vacation plans, many will inevitably be pressed -- or at least invited -- to purchase travel insurance. But is it really worth it? Some travelers don't think so, having taken trip after trip without any problems, or, because of some exclusion, found out they weren't covered when they thought they were. Others have been relieved to be reimbursed for lost airfare and hotel fees when illness or some other misfortune unexpectedly kept them home.
TRAVEL
By Catharine Hamm and Catharine Hamm,Tribune Newspapers | May 17, 2009
Question: : I am going to Mexico in August with my family and am worried about the flu. I called Continental and tried to cancel my reservation, but I cannot get my money back. Continental says it's too far in the future. But I have a time share that I need to cancel now or lose my fee. I am very frightened; I have three children and a boyfriend with medical problems, so we would appreciate some advice. Whom can I call? Answer: : Ghostbusters. You are caught in an unfortunate and seemingly ectoplasmic event because of three tenets of travel: No. 1: Travel providers don't refund money - at least, not very often.
TRAVEL
By Donald D. Groff and Donald D. Groff,PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER | October 28, 2001
Is this a good time to cash in frequent-flier miles for free flights? Yes -- in many cases. Despite early speculation after Sept. 11 that frequent-flier programs might be in danger of suspension by strapped airlines, several lines are using their programs to lure passengers back into the air. At least five airlines, including US Airways, have for a limited time reduced to 15,000 the mileage required for a free coach-class domestic flight. Normally, the amount needed is 20,000 to 30,000 miles, depending on the airline and timing.
TRAVEL
August 6, 2006
CLEAR LAKE, WIS. -- Marsha Scheuermann met her husband Dave in an Internet chat room where they shared their passion for the 1960s TV sitcom The Andy Griffith Show. Eventually, they fell in love and married. Today, they live in a replica of Sheriff Taylor's home, and they run a bed-and-breakfast there called the Taylor Home Inn. ROAD TRIP USA Avalon Travel / $29.95 Bible-sized at 890 slick-finished pages and subtitled Cross-Country Adventures on America's Two-Lane Highways, this fourth edition catalogs 35,000 miles of American blacktop on six north-south routes and five east-west routes that travel the nation.
TRAVEL
By Catharine Hamm and Catharine Hamm,Tribune Newspapers | May 17, 2009
Question: : I am going to Mexico in August with my family and am worried about the flu. I called Continental and tried to cancel my reservation, but I cannot get my money back. Continental says it's too far in the future. But I have a time share that I need to cancel now or lose my fee. I am very frightened; I have three children and a boyfriend with medical problems, so we would appreciate some advice. Whom can I call? Answer: : Ghostbusters. You are caught in an unfortunate and seemingly ectoplasmic event because of three tenets of travel: No. 1: Travel providers don't refund money - at least, not very often.
TRAVEL
By MICHELLE DEAL-ZIMMERMAN and MICHELLE DEAL-ZIMMERMAN,michelle.deal@baltsun.com, twitter.com/suntravelblog | March 29, 2009
Vacations are supposed to be good for your health, but what happens when you face a medical emergency in the middle of a trip? In Natasha Richardson's tragic case, a fall on a beginner's slope at a Canadian ski resort was deadly. But many other vacationers have suffered heart attacks, strokes, car crashes or other accidental injuries. Last month, several cruise passengers on an excursion in the Caribbean were seriously hurt when the bus they were riding in lost control and veered into a ditch.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose and Eileen Ambrose,Sun Columnist | July 8, 2007
We see terrorist attacks at airports, record airline delays and bankruptcies among travel providers. No wonder people are buying so much travel insurance. But is all that spending - $1.3 billion last year, at least twice the annual figures before Sept. 11, 2001 - worth it? Not necessarily. You may have coverage for some of your travel concerns. And considering that the typical policy runs 4 percent to 8 percent of the cost of your trip, that can be a sizable sum to buy what you already have.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Higgins and Michelle Higgins,New York Times News Service | May 13, 2007
As summer approaches and travelers plunk down nonrefundable deposits to secure their vacation plans, many will inevitably be pressed -- or at least invited -- to purchase travel insurance. But is it really worth it? Some travelers don't think so, having taken trip after trip without any problems, or, because of some exclusion, found out they weren't covered when they thought they were. Others have been relieved to be reimbursed for lost airfare and hotel fees when illness or some other misfortune unexpectedly kept them home.
TRAVEL
August 6, 2006
CLEAR LAKE, WIS. -- Marsha Scheuermann met her husband Dave in an Internet chat room where they shared their passion for the 1960s TV sitcom The Andy Griffith Show. Eventually, they fell in love and married. Today, they live in a replica of Sheriff Taylor's home, and they run a bed-and-breakfast there called the Taylor Home Inn. ROAD TRIP USA Avalon Travel / $29.95 Bible-sized at 890 slick-finished pages and subtitled Cross-Country Adventures on America's Two-Lane Highways, this fourth edition catalogs 35,000 miles of American blacktop on six north-south routes and five east-west routes that travel the nation.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | December 11, 2004
St. Paul Travelers Cos. Inc., the second-largest U.S. commercial insurer, said yesterday that it received a subpoena from New York Attorney General Eliot Spitzer about malpractice insurance sold to lawyers. St. Paul Travelers is the biggest insurer among at least six that have disclosed the subpoenas. Spitzer's antitrust investigators are probing lawyers' concerns that insurance companies may have improperly dropped liability coverage for class action attorneys, whom insurers blame for driving up the cost of litigation claims.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | October 25, 2001
The Baltimore County school board, wrestling with whether to cancel foreign field trips because of safety concerns brought on by the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks and subsequent world events, will spend the next two weeks hearing from concerned parents, students and teachers before taking a vote. This is what the board has heard from George Chiles, father of an eighth-grader at Parkville Middle School, which might cancel a planned trip to Spain in March: "This experience can in no way be duplicated in the classroom.
BUSINESS
By Lorene Yue | May 2, 2004
If you're the sort of person who worries about everything, the insurance industry has a policy -- or policies -- for you. A newcomer to the field is online auction protection. Buy Safe Inc. of Alexandria, Va., offers a surety-bond product if you sell stuff through an online auction site such as eBay. "We guarantee a seller's performance to the buyer," said Jeff Grass, president and chief executive of Buy Safe. "We allow sellers to signal to buyers that they are trustworthy." Sellers must be screened by Buy Safe, and the company collects 1 percent of the sales price as its fee. Buyers purchasing from Buy Safe clients reap the benefits of the surety bond for free.
BUSINESS
By Lorene Yue | May 2, 2004
If you're the sort of person who worries about everything, the insurance industry has a policy -- or policies -- for you. A newcomer to the field is online auction protection. Buy Safe Inc. of Alexandria, Va., offers a surety-bond product if you sell stuff through an online auction site such as eBay. "We guarantee a seller's performance to the buyer," said Jeff Grass, president and chief executive of Buy Safe. "We allow sellers to signal to buyers that they are trustworthy." Sellers must be screened by Buy Safe, and the company collects 1 percent of the sales price as its fee. Buyers purchasing from Buy Safe clients reap the benefits of the surety bond for free.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | February 19, 2004
Although he travels abroad several times a year for work, Peter Young paid little attention last year when his company, the brokerage T. Rowe Price Associates, sent out an e-mail that it was contracting for travel assistance service. Then, last summer, Young's son, Jamie, was injured on an overseas school trip. The 15-year-old slipped and fell 30 feet from a rocky cliff to a beach on Spain's northern coast. He was hospitalized in Gijon with a fractured pelvis. Spanish doctors said Jamie should lie flat for six weeks.
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