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By Alfred Borcover and Alfred Borcover,Chicago Tribune | January 3, 1993
With cautious optimism, travel authorities are forecasting a 1993 slightly better than 1992. That's the message from the U.S. Travel Data Center's annual Outlook Forum held recently in Washington.An improved economy, of course, is the key to even cautious optimism for continued growth of the travel and tourism industry. Tourism, the country's third-largest retail industry, contributed $330 billion to the economy in 1990, the latest figure available.Among the industry segments with somewhat bright outlooks are individual states, cruise lines, auto travel, Amtrak, lodging and adventure travel.
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By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2010
Surely some of the students at Folly Quarter Middle School in Ellicott City have ridden an Eyre bus. Now they will be learning all that goes into getting one from departure to arrival. The Glenelg-based tour and travel company has formed a partnership with the school that will teach students about its place in the tourism industry. The students will learn about planning a route and scheduling, and apply those aspects of the business to classroom subjects such as math and geography.
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BUSINESS
By June Arney | May 24, 1998
MEMORIAL DAY signifies the traditional kickoff of summer vacations, and, with a booming economy, this holiday's travel is expected to set a record -- with 32.1 million Americans going at least 100 miles from home -- and lead into a robust season for the travel and hospitality industries.More Americans will be traveling with their children, and there will be a big jump in the number of vacationers going fishing, according to the Travel Industry Association of America and AAA. This summer, 25 percent of Americans will be attending a family reunion.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun reporter | August 10, 2008
So it's August. Prime time for picnics and pool parties. It's also time to plan end-of-the-year holiday travel. Seriously. Now. Airlines plan to significantly cut flights after Labor Day, decreasing seating by 10 percent, while increasing ticket prices. And those prices are likely to continue rising through the fall, industry watchers said, with flights for Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year's filling up fast. If you wait to book, you run the risk of paying more for a slim selection.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | December 29, 1991
The tiny kingdom of Bhutan, which lies between India and Tibet in the Himalayas, has privatized its travel industry. Private travel companies now handle all travel arrangements, while the Tourist Authority of Bhutan authorizes visas.United States tour companies are: InnerAsia Expeditions, 2627 Lombard St., San Francisco, Calif. 94123, (800) 777-8183; and Bhutan Travel, 120 E. 56th St., New York, N.Y. 10022, (212) 838-6382.
BUSINESS
By Kathy Bergen and Kathy Bergen,Chicago Tribune | November 10, 2006
The U.S. travel industry's robust recovery is slipping into slow-growth mode as rising consumer prices and weakening corporate profits instill caution in leisure and business travelers, the Travel Industry Association forecast yesterday. Domestic vacation travel is expected to rise 2 percent this year, to 2.03 billion individual trips, and by an additional 1 percent to 2 percent next year, to about 2.05 billion trips. U.S. business travel is likely to be flat this year, with 516.8 million trips, and to rise 1 percent to 2 percent in 2007, to about 524.9 million trips.
TRAVEL
By Amy Gunderson and Amy Gunderson,New York Times News Service | June 6, 2004
Summer hasn't officially kicked off, but you would hardly know it by looking at the crowds. A warm California spring sent visitors flocking to Yosemite National Park. In Washington, the Vietnam Veterans Memorial has already clocked 1 million more visitors than at this time last year. Freedom Trail tours in Boston are up by 30 percent. And Las Vegas was bursting with visitors this March, with 98 percent of hotel rooms booked on the weekends. Get ready to stand in line. After four years in a slump, the travel industry is gearing up to welcome back the crowds for what is predicted to be the busiest summer since 2000.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | January 24, 1993
This is the season of surveys, and in the travel field they seem to cover everything from AAAutos to ZZZsleep:*The emerging '90s traveler is putting more emphasis oenrichment than on pure escapism, according to a survey conducted by Louis Harris and Associates for Travel & Leisure magazine. More than 80 percent of frequent leisure travelers surveyed rated cultural and historical treasures and places with natural beauty much higher than night life, luxury resorts and shopping. Here's a breakdown of what respondents most often listed as important:Location with natural beauty, 96 percent; visiting a place where they've never been, 89 percent; creating own itinerary, 89 percent; experiencing cultural, historical or archaeological treasures, 83 percent; going off the beaten path, 73 percent; able to take great pictures, 73 percent; examining a different culture, 69 percent.
BUSINESS
By Maria Mallory | February 5, 1991
First airfares went through the roof, and then a recession further dampened traveler enthusiasm. As if things weren't bad enough, Saddam Hussein has become the latest scourge of the travel industry."
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | September 29, 1999
The launch of a new program designed to boost international travel to the United States could increase visits to Maryland by a couple of hundred thousand people each of the next few years.That kind of increase in international visitors would bring as much as $100 million to $150 million more in spending to the state annually, according to George Williams, state director of tourism."Ultimately, if the U.S. is seen more favorably, that strengthens our ability to tie into it," Williams said.
TRAVEL
By Ellen Uzelac and Ellen Uzelac,Special to the Sun | May 4, 2008
Imagine reading a novel on your BlackBerry while cruising the Mediterranean, or using your mobile device instead of a paper boarding pass at the airport. And what about this? Getting alerts on your GPS-enabled cell phone to notify you of popular eateries and shops within a five-block radius of where you happen to be standing -- whether it's in New York, Paris, Sydney, Australia, or Shanghai, China. Imagine no longer. All that stuff? It's here, and more is on the way as mobile devices become smarter, faster and cheaper.
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER | January 20, 2008
My friend Betsy called me from in front of her stove, where she has been cooking for her four children for too many years to count. "What's wrong with this picture?" she asked. "I have one child headed to Colorado, another child headed to Israel, another one on her way to Mexico and the fourth is planning a trip to Norway." Her children are just about out of college and almost on their own, and Betsy thought she would be the one doing the traveling at this time in her life. "I know just what you mean," I said.
TRAVEL
By Beverly Beyette and Beverly Beyette,Los Angeles Times | April 8, 2007
So you've skied in St. Moritz, danced until daybreak at carnival in Rio and shopped until you dropped in Tokyo's Ginza. Now you seek a real adventure. "Bespoke" travel may be in your future. Bespoke - a fancy way of saying custom, tailor-made or independent - is one of the fastest-growing segments of the travel industry, fueled by affluent, been-there-done-that travelers who wouldn't be caught dead on one of those board-the-buses tours. They want to float down the Ganges during a tribute to an Indian river goddess, take an early-morning alms walk with Laotian monks or come face to face with cannibals on the island of New Guinea.
NEWS
By Rebecca Helm-Ropelato | March 28, 2007
ROME -- The tall Steven Seagal double standing just beyond the security check at Beauvais Airport outside Paris earlier this year spoke to me as I picked up my purse from the conveyor belt and motioned to me to open it. I lifted the flap on the front pocket and removed the first thing my fingers touched. It was a glossy, gold-colored tube of lipstick I had paid extortionist rates for a couple of months before. No, he shook his head. I pulled out the next thing. It was a glass vial of throat spray for my allergies.
BUSINESS
By Kathy Bergen and Kathy Bergen,Chicago Tribune | November 10, 2006
The U.S. travel industry's robust recovery is slipping into slow-growth mode as rising consumer prices and weakening corporate profits instill caution in leisure and business travelers, the Travel Industry Association forecast yesterday. Domestic vacation travel is expected to rise 2 percent this year, to 2.03 billion individual trips, and by an additional 1 percent to 2 percent next year, to about 2.05 billion trips. U.S. business travel is likely to be flat this year, with 516.8 million trips, and to rise 1 percent to 2 percent in 2007, to about 524.9 million trips.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,SUN STAFF | August 11, 2005
One morning in February, just as dawn broke, Janet Ridgway found herself gazing over the African continent from the top of Mount Kilimanjaro. It was hard to believe: The 65-year-old former kindergarten teacher with the "short" legs, bundled in a parka, breath streaming out in the thin, frosty air, was standing on the roof of Africa. Awed and humbled, she thought about her late husband, and about the mother who had raised her long ago in a very small, very flat town in Kansas. Then she posed for photos with her companions, five other women who came together to climb the 19,340-foot peak, and in so doing symbolically joined the growing ranks of women pursuing travel without the company of men. Not only are more women signing up for active vacations with women-only operators like Adventures in Good Company, the Baltimore-based company that mounted the African journey, they are also taking all-female trips to spas and vineyards, filling up theater and shopping tours, and making pilgrimages to sacred sites.
FEATURES
By Kristin Jackson and Kristin Jackson,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | August 18, 1996
Wake up and start marketing to minority travelers.That's the underlying message to the travel industry in a report released Aug. 6 by the Travel Industry Association of America. It examines the travel patterns of the United States' three largest minority groups: African-Americans, Hispanic Americans, and Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders.However, "minority" is becoming a misnomer (and the report's three groups represent dozens of cultures). "Today, ethnic groups represent 26 percent of the U.S. population.
FEATURES
By Eileen Ogintz and Eileen Ogintz,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | March 30, 1997
Get ready, get packed, GO!That's exactly what at least 68 million families are doing this spring, the Travel Industry Association says in its new research report. They'll be building sand castles at beaches, standing in line at theme parks and trying to keep warm in their tents at lakeside campgrounds."People feel good about their personal finances and about the economy," explains Shawn Flaherty, a spokesman for the Travel Industry Association, the research arm of the tourism industry. "We're anticipating more kids out there," she says.
TRAVEL
By Larry Bleiberg and Larry Bleiberg,DALLAS MORNING NEWS | May 1, 2005
We all have plenty of reasons to travel: adventure, relaxation, education. How about longevity? Taking trips is part of a healthy lifestyle - especially for seniors, says Dr. David Lipschitz. The University of Arkansas geriatrician and author says travel helps people in several ways, some of them surprising. He also foresees a travel revolution in coming years as baby boomers retire in record numbers and hit the road. One reason people should travel is that it will help them live longer, he explains.
TRAVEL
By Amy Gunderson and Amy Gunderson,New York Times News Service | June 6, 2004
Summer hasn't officially kicked off, but you would hardly know it by looking at the crowds. A warm California spring sent visitors flocking to Yosemite National Park. In Washington, the Vietnam Veterans Memorial has already clocked 1 million more visitors than at this time last year. Freedom Trail tours in Boston are up by 30 percent. And Las Vegas was bursting with visitors this March, with 98 percent of hotel rooms booked on the weekends. Get ready to stand in line. After four years in a slump, the travel industry is gearing up to welcome back the crowds for what is predicted to be the busiest summer since 2000.
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