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BUSINESS
By Tom Belden and Tom Belden,Knight-Ridder | September 30, 1991
PHILADELPHIA -- From the mom-and-pops to the multinational giants, travel agencies are facing some of the toughest times since the early 1980s.Some agencies are defaulting on their payments to airlines; others are trying to merge with competitors, and a few are closing offices.The agencies' problems started last fall, when the slowing of the economy and tensions in the Middle East caused travel to slacken. When the Persian Gulf war broke out in January, international travel plummeted -- at the same time that the economy in the United States and much of the rest of the world went into the deep freeze.
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TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman and The Baltimore Sun | January 21, 2013
When it comes to the Super Bowl, Ravens fans are ready to go. Literally. In less than 24 hours since winning the AFC Championship, fans have booked just about every flight out of town to New Orleans. “[Demand] is overwhelming…” said  Buzz Levin, owner of The Travel Committee, a group and corporate travel agency based in Owings Mills. Levin said his company doesn't normally work with the general public, but being based locally and seeing the enthusiasm of the Ravens nation has caused him to make this Super Bowl an exception.
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BUSINESS
By Tom Belden and Tom Belden,Knight-Ridder | April 22, 1991
In the same way the U.S. airline industry is being whittled down to just a half-dozen major carriers and a few good-size regional players, the travel-agency business also is changing.Most vacation planning and a lot of business travel for small and medium-size companies is done by thousands of mom-and-pop travel agencies staffed by half a dozen or fewer employees.But increasingly, major corporations are turning to a handful of big agencies, at which they are consolidating all travel management.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | November 18, 2012
Lynly Safran McCoog, a homemaker who was a Lutherville school volunteer, died of breast cancer Nov. 13 at the Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care in Towson. She was 43 and lived in Lutherville. Born Lynly Safran in Toms River, N.J., she was the daughter of Robert Safran Sr. and Kathryn Nicholl Safran. She was raised in York, Pa., and was a 1987 graduate of York Suburban High School. She earned a bachelor of arts in English at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. She met her future husband, Kevin J. McCoog, a graduate of Loyola University Maryland who works in software sales.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | April 15, 2003
Area travel agents report that business is down as a result of the war with Iraq, but not as much as they initially had feared. "I don't think it's as bad as I thought it was going to be," said Carol Pennington, president of Inner Harbor Travel Inc. in Baltimore. "You envision another terrorism attack and wonder whether you're going to be able to survive." Over a relatively short time span, the travel agency business has struggled with the post- Sept. 11 downturn, recession, commission cuts by airlines, cruise ship maladies, an outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,SUN STAFF | February 27, 1996
For Robert and Betty Ewing, it was to be a 39th anniversary celebration. They would fly to Tampa -- their first airline trip -- then sail to Cozumel, Mexico. But just before the scheduled departure last November, the cruise line went belly up, leaving the Ewings and a string of friends from a South Baltimore senior center empty-handed."We were called down to the Allen Center five days before the cruise," said Mr. Ewing, a retired Domino Sugar worker. "Everybody was excited, getting ready to go, and suddenly nobody was going anywhere."
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,SUN STAFF | October 12, 1997
For years, travel agencies were members of the "something-for nothing" club. They found the best airline deal, booked it and then delivered the tickets. With airlines paying agents handsome commissions, the cost to the consumer was zilch.But two years ago, in a dramatic move, the airlines capped travel agent commissions for domestic tickets. And recently, they took a 20 percent whack at commissions, prompting many agencies to charge a fee that amounts to an indirect increase in airfares."The customer is basically getting hit with a ticket price increase," said Dan Bohan, chief operating officer for Omega World Travel, based in Arlington, Va.Without the fees, travel agents say, they can't survive the latest commission cut, to 8 percent from 10 percent.
FEATURES
By Deloris Tarzan Ament and Deloris Tarzan Ament,Seattle Times | August 29, 1993
It just got easier to find travel videos. For that, and for the improved quality of many travel videos, you can credit some plain, old-fashioned griping.Did you ever buy a travel video and feel ripped off when you got near the end to find a series of "infomercials" for hotels and tourist attractions? Well, you're not alone.A letter from Darrell Turner, chairman and publisher of Travelview International travel videos, headquartered in Houston, Texas, says his company changed its product line when customers complained about feeling they were paying for ads.The original Travelview tapes had two parts: a non-commercial destination feature, followed by a series of "infomercials."
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,SUN STAFF | August 17, 1996
Roland Park Travel is purchasing Bennett World Travel, a 12-year-old independently owned Ellicott City agency, in a deal that will make the North Baltimore company one of the largest independent, leisure travel agencies in the Baltimore area.The acquisition, expected to be completed within a week, will give Roland Park Travel annual sales of more than $12 million.Bennett World Travel, like its buyer, specializes in leisure travel, with 70 percent of its business concentrated there and the remainder in corporate accounts.
FEATURES
By Edmund L. Andrews and Edmund L. Andrews,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 16, 1998
Here is a pop quiz for bargain-hunters traveling in Europe. A pair of leather loafers from J.P. Tod's costs about 308,000 lire in Rome, 26,500 pesetas in Madrid and 400 marks in Frankfurt.Where are the shoes cheapest?The answer requires a calculator, a list of exchange rates and a lot of tenacity. But there is a big difference: At $176 in Rome, the shoes are about $50 cheaper than in Frankfurt.And that difference marks just one illustration of how the launch of a single European currency, the euro, should eventually have a big impact on travelers.
BUSINESS
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | August 10, 2012
A number of travelers who booked a trip through Travelocity using an offer promoted by the Baltimore-based National Federation of the Blind have had their trips canceled for improperly claiming the discount. In early July, the federation sent out a message to its followers on Twitter noting that "Travelocity has offered NFB members $200 off a three-night hotel and flight package through September 4; use code NFB2012. " As can happen in the world of Internet promotions, with the code widely available online, some travelers took advantage of the deal even though they were not members of the NFB. On a Facebook page dedicated to the dispute, other travelers said they had joined the NFB — at-large membership is $10 — just to save money on their trip.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2011
John W. Moyer Sr., a retired Towson criminal defense lawyer who enjoyed coaching youth sports, died of pneumonia Sept. 17 at Upper Chesapeake Medical Center in Bel Air. The former Long Green Valley resident was 84. The son of the manager of the Wagner Electric Co. and a homemaker, John W. Moyer Sr. was born in Baltimore and raised in Overlea. After graduating from Kenwood High School in 1945, he briefly served in the Navy at the Memphis, Tenn., and Jacksonville, Fla., naval stations.
TRAVEL
By Catharine Hamm and Catharine Hamm,Los Angeles Times | March 1, 2009
I am planning a trip to Madrid this summer and want to use an online travel agency to book my hotel room. Not having used a service like this before, I want to know what pitfalls I could encounter. For instance, I don't want to end up in a basement room or over the garbage dump, so how do I avoid surprises? I've booked scores of hotel rooms using online travel agencies, and I've not yet ended up in a dump or over one. But you can help avoid that check-in shock by doing some extra homework, our experts say. "Call the hotel - not the reservations number but the local number - and ask to speak with the manager or whoever is in charge.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Higgins and Michelle Higgins,New York Times News Service | October 7, 2007
For a trip to Barcelona, Jorge Cuadros, a lawyer from Alexandria, Va., turned to the Internet to book a rental car. On hertz.com, Cuadros was quoted a price of 626.12 euros for an automatic Mercedes for five days in October. At $1.42 to the euro, that amounted to about $890. SAN FRANCISCO ENCOUNTER Lonely Planet / $11.99 Lonely Planet's Encounter series consists of compact pocket guides for city visitors on a tight sightseeing schedule. Each is designed to enable the traveler to "discover twice the city in half the time."
TRAVEL
By CHRISTOPHER ELLIOTT and CHRISTOPHER ELLIOTT,NEW YORK TIMES | January 1, 2006
If Mary Ann Slater's 13-year-old stepdaughter, Alyssa, had missed her flight from El Paso, Texas, to New York last summer, she might have been forced to buy an expensive one-way ticket home and wait hours for the next plane. But that was before online travel agencies morphed into self-described "consumer champions." When Slater recently called Travelocity, the agency she booked her stepdaughter's tickets through, to tell them Alyssa hadn't made it to the airport on time, a call-center agent came to the rescue.
NEWS
August 8, 2005
Roger Miller Dalsheimer, a former owner of Suburban Travel in Pikesville, died of complications from a stroke Friday at Union Memorial Hospital. He was 78 and lived in Baltimore. A Baltimore native, Mr. Dalsheimer was a 1945 graduate of McDonough School in Owings Mills and a 1949 graduate of the Johns Hopkins University, where he earned a degree in political science. He was a chaplain's assistant in the Navy, and later earned an MBA from Case Western University. In 1957, he married Babette Halle.
BUSINESS
By Tom Belden and Tom Belden,Knight-Ridder NewspapersBusiness travel | January 6, 1992
1991 was a grim year for business travel. First the Persian Gulf War and then the recession caused companies everywhere to cut back on travel. Travel managers, corporate travel agencies and business travelers all have been asked to wrack their brains in search of ways to lower costs.It was, no doubt, this fevered atmosphere of expense-account slashing that led an anonymous individual or group to draft a memo this fall, listing some of the most draconian ideas imaginable for saving money.Here are some excerpts from the tongue-in-cheek travel policy, which circulated among numerous Fortune 500 companies and big travel agencies and recently was printed in Travel Weekly, a trade magazine.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 15, 1994
At airports and travel agencies yesterday, the crash of an American Eagle commuter aircraft Tuesday -- the second in two months -- set off ripples of concern, fear and resignation, but led to few cancellations.For the most part, travel agents said the reaction to the crash near Raleigh-Durham International Airport in North Carolina was considerably more muted than the rush of calls they received after the USAir crash in Pittsburgh on Sept. 8 in which 132 lost their lives on a Boeing 737-300 jet."
NEWS
By Amanda Ponko and Amanda Ponko,SPECIALTO THE SUN | March 21, 2004
Mig G. Sturr, owner and operator of Creative Travel Planners Inc., a travel agency in Bel Air, has recently provided hope for prospective tourists who have accessibility needs, such as those with hearing, vision or mobility impairments. She knows of no similar company in the area, she said, providing clients with the ability to travel with portable dialysis machines, seeing-eye dogs for the blind, wheelchairs and nurses or aides that accompany a traveler in need of constant care. "My goal is to see how many people I can send on vacation who thought they were no longer able to travel," she said.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | December 17, 2003
Orbitz Inc., an online travel agency backed by the five biggest U.S. airlines, raised $316.7 million yesterday in an initial public offering valuing the company at about $1 billion. Orbitz, based in Chicago, sold 12.18 million shares at $26 each after indicating a range of $22 to $24 in a Securities and Exchange Commission filing. The airlines sold 8.18 million shares, and Orbitz sold 4 million shares. The company will use the proceeds to finance its business. AMR Corp.'s American Airlines Inc. and UAL Corp.
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