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HEALTH
By Kelly Brewington, The Baltimore Sun | January 21, 2011
Doctors have called Rep. Gabrielle Giffords' recovery so far nothing short of spectacular. But as she begins rehabilitation at a facility in Houston, many Maryland experts on traumatic brain injury caution that what awaits her is a long, arduous road full of uncertainties. The work of retraining the brain after a severe gunshot wound like the one Giffords sustained two weeks ago can take years, beginning with months of intensive speech, occupational and physical therapy to teach the Arizona congresswoman to master basic functions many of us take for granted: dressing herself, eating and, perhaps, uttering a few words.
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TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2014
A Virginia mother has filed a $1 million suit against Trimper's Rides and Amusements in Ocean City claiming a ride left her young son with a traumatic brain injury. Raffinee McNeill, of Accomack County, filed the personal injury claim in U.S. District Court on July 23. According to the court filing, her son and his cousins were on the Hampton I, a ride geared toward youngsters that features miniature trucks and cars that travel in a circle, when an operator "abruptly" halted the ride to let another child off. At that time, McNeill claims, her son thought the ride was over and he also got out of his car. The operator resumed the ride and one of the cars hit her son, knocking him down and "fracturing his skull on the cement floor," according to the complaint.
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NEWS
March 31, 2014
In January, Rick Raemisch was brought shackled and handcuffed to a state penitentiary in Colorado and deposited in a 13-by-17-foot cell with nothing in it except a bed, toilet and sink screwed to the floor. His restraints were removed, the door slammed shut behind him and then he was alone. Mr. Raemisch had committed no crime. He was, in fact, the recently appointed head of Colorado's corrections department, and as he later wrote in a New York Times op-ed, he hoped that by putting himself in an inmate's place he might get "a better sense of what solitary confinement was like, and what it did to the prisoners who were housed there, sometimes for years.
NEWS
March 31, 2014
In January, Rick Raemisch was brought shackled and handcuffed to a state penitentiary in Colorado and deposited in a 13-by-17-foot cell with nothing in it except a bed, toilet and sink screwed to the floor. His restraints were removed, the door slammed shut behind him and then he was alone. Mr. Raemisch had committed no crime. He was, in fact, the recently appointed head of Colorado's corrections department, and as he later wrote in a New York Times op-ed, he hoped that by putting himself in an inmate's place he might get "a better sense of what solitary confinement was like, and what it did to the prisoners who were housed there, sometimes for years.
NEWS
March 3, 2006
Did you know?--About 1.5 million Americans sustain a traumatic brain injury each year. - Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 12, 2007
When Staff Sgt. Jarod Behee was asked to select a paint color for the customized wheelchair that was going to be his future, his young wife seethed. The government, Marissa Behee believed, was giving up on her husband just five months after he took a sniper's bullet to the head during his second tour of duty in Iraq. Marissa Behee, a sunny Californian who was just completing a degree in interior design, possessed a keen faith in her then 26-year-old husband's potential to be rehabilitated from a severe traumatic brain injury.
NEWS
By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 22, 2000
IN A JANUARY Neighbors column, we introduced you to Shelby Tribull, a little girl who had suffered traumatic brain injury on April 26, 1999, when she was hit by a van while riding her bike. In a coma, she was airlifted from her Cape St. Claire neighborhood to Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, where doctors gave Beth and Ed Tribull little hope that their child would survive the night. Shelby made it through the night, and beyond - but recovery is slow, measured in months or years. And surviving traumatic brain injury is a frightening thing, Beth Tribull says.
NEWS
By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 20, 2000
BETH TRIBULL of Cape St. Claire remembers what a friend said to her last spring, during the dark days after her little girl's accident: "Sometimes when a door is shut, if you spend too much time looking at the closed door, you miss the open door." The accident that abruptly closed many doors for Beth and Eddie Tribull happened on a bright spring afternoon April 26. Their 7-year-old daughter, Shelby, was riding her bike when she stopped in the street to fix her shoe. The driver of an approaching van didn't see the child until it was too late.
SPORTS
By Dan Appenfeller, The Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2013
Whitney Sibol looked up to see a buoy ahead as she continued her front crawl along the Bird River in eastern Baltimore County. Like so many times before, her left arm came out of the water as she continued to swim. It was Sunday, June 3, 2012. "I'm almost there," she thought. Then, it was Thursday, and the Perry Hall High alumna was in Maryland Shock Trauma Center, her pelvis and a scapula fractured, ribs caved and left extremities devoid of feeling. Her mother, Judy, was speaking with nurses about an accident.
SPORTS
By Christian Ewell and Christian Ewell,SUN STAFF | October 3, 1999
The sport often regarded as the world's most wide-open and disorganized, boxing, is also the most regimented in its response to head injuries.When the referee stops an amateur bout, the loser disappears from the scene for a period ranging from 30 to 180 days, according to the official rules of USA Boxing.Passbooks containing fight histories accompany amateurs in search of competition. They can't fight without the document, which works as a monitor for knockout victims."It's a nice, simple system, but one that makes it relatively easy to regulate and make sure that people who have been knocked out can't get back right away," said Dr. Walter Stewart, who serves as a physician at many fights in the area.
SPORTS
By Alexander Pyles and The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2013
More than six years ago, Scott Collier suffered a traumatic brain injury in an automobile accident. Though he's recovered, he says the injury changed his personality temporarily and his life forever. Now, he wants to use that experience to improve awareness of traumatic brain injuries, especially concussions at the youth and high school sports level. On Tuesday afternoon at CCBC's Dundalk campus, Collier said he plans to hold a seminar on traumatic brain injuries that he expects will be attended by representatives from Baltimore County Public Schools and county Department of Recreation and Parks Director Barry F. Williams.
SPORTS
By Dan Appenfeller, The Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2013
Whitney Sibol looked up to see a buoy ahead as she continued her front crawl along the Bird River in eastern Baltimore County. Like so many times before, her left arm came out of the water as she continued to swim. It was Sunday, June 3, 2012. "I'm almost there," she thought. Then, it was Thursday, and the Perry Hall High alumna was in Maryland Shock Trauma Center, her pelvis and a scapula fractured, ribs caved and left extremities devoid of feeling. Her mother, Judy, was speaking with nurses about an accident.
HEALTH
From Sun news services | April 2, 2013
The White House proposed a sweeping new initiative Tuesday to map the individual cells and circuits that make up the human brain, a project that will give scientists a better understanding of how a healthy brain works and how to devise better treatments for injuries and diseases. "There is this enormous mystery waiting to be unlocked," said President Barack Obama of the project unveiled at a White House ceremony packed with scientists. Called the Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies Initiative, the program would be funded with an initial $100 million from the president's fiscal 2014 budget, which the White House is to release next week.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | March 26, 2012
I am ashamed to admit that my heart aches for Staff Sgt. Robert Bales, and I feel almost nothing for the families of the Afghan men, women and children he is accused of killing. It is alarming, almost horrifying, to realize that I feel this wave of sadness for him and for his wife and two young children but can find no pity for the people he is said to have methodically gunned down. He snapped, I tell myself. He was in his fourth combat tour and had just seen the grave wounds of a comrade, and something inside him just broke apart.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2011
The daylong conference Saturday at Johns Hopkins Hospital was held to showcase advances on research into traumatic brain injury. One recurring theme was the devastating toll such injuries have taken on an estimated 200,000 American soldiers wounded by explosions in Iraq and Afghanistan. The PowerPoint-wielding medical specialists had much progress to share. But the extent to which these brain injuries remain a stubborn mystery was highlighted when a doctor who treats soldiers in Fort Drum, N.Y., stepped up to the microphone at Turner Auditorium.
HEALTH
By Kelly Brewington, The Baltimore Sun | January 21, 2011
Doctors have called Rep. Gabrielle Giffords' recovery so far nothing short of spectacular. But as she begins rehabilitation at a facility in Houston, many Maryland experts on traumatic brain injury caution that what awaits her is a long, arduous road full of uncertainties. The work of retraining the brain after a severe gunshot wound like the one Giffords sustained two weeks ago can take years, beginning with months of intensive speech, occupational and physical therapy to teach the Arizona congresswoman to master basic functions many of us take for granted: dressing herself, eating and, perhaps, uttering a few words.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | March 26, 2012
I am ashamed to admit that my heart aches for Staff Sgt. Robert Bales, and I feel almost nothing for the families of the Afghan men, women and children he is accused of killing. It is alarming, almost horrifying, to realize that I feel this wave of sadness for him and for his wife and two young children but can find no pity for the people he is said to have methodically gunned down. He snapped, I tell myself. He was in his fourth combat tour and had just seen the grave wounds of a comrade, and something inside him just broke apart.
HEALTH
From Sun news services | April 2, 2013
The White House proposed a sweeping new initiative Tuesday to map the individual cells and circuits that make up the human brain, a project that will give scientists a better understanding of how a healthy brain works and how to devise better treatments for injuries and diseases. "There is this enormous mystery waiting to be unlocked," said President Barack Obama of the project unveiled at a White House ceremony packed with scientists. Called the Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies Initiative, the program would be funded with an initial $100 million from the president's fiscal 2014 budget, which the White House is to release next week.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | November 9, 2010
Austin Story doesn't remember the late-summer outing at a friend's lakefront home in New Jersey, or the rocks he climbed near a waterfall. Or how he lost his footing and, as his horrified mother looked on, fell about 50 feet. The 14-year-old lay motionless with a traumatic brain injury as his father tried to get him off the rocks and find help. Two months later, Austin is still being treated at the Kennedy Krieger Institute in Baltimore, though he has learned again to walk and talk.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 12, 2007
When Staff Sgt. Jarod Behee was asked to select a paint color for the customized wheelchair that was going to be his future, his young wife seethed. The government, Marissa Behee believed, was giving up on her husband just five months after he took a sniper's bullet to the head during his second tour of duty in Iraq. Marissa Behee, a sunny Californian who was just completing a degree in interior design, possessed a keen faith in her then 26-year-old husband's potential to be rehabilitated from a severe traumatic brain injury.
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