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NEWS
May 24, 2010
Nearly every one of the cuts Mayor Stephanie C. Rawlings-Blake has said will be necessary if the city doesn't enact her $50 million tax package will be painful to residents across the city. From police department staffing at the top of the list to graffiti removal at the bottom, virtually every cut could, in ways great or small, imperil the progress Baltimore has made in recent years. That's certainly true of bulk trash pickup, without which city officials are justifiably worried about an increase in illegal dumping of unsightly items such as refrigerators, mattresses and sofas.
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NEWS
May 24, 2010
Nearly every one of the cuts Mayor Stephanie C. Rawlings-Blake has said will be necessary if the city doesn't enact her $50 million tax package will be painful to residents across the city. From police department staffing at the top of the list to graffiti removal at the bottom, virtually every cut could, in ways great or small, imperil the progress Baltimore has made in recent years. That's certainly true of bulk trash pickup, without which city officials are justifiably worried about an increase in illegal dumping of unsightly items such as refrigerators, mattresses and sofas.
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NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Evening Sun Staff | September 19, 1990
Imagine a time when everyone in the Baltimore metropolitan area pays a monthly fee for trash disposal, when 50 percent of Baltimore area trash is recycled -- and sold to cover the cost of recycling -- and when local governments cut their property tax rates by 25 cents or more because the money isn't needed to pay for trash disposal.That time is near, according to the report of a combined city-county trash tax committee whose members yesterday approved final recommendations to be presented to their respective legislative bodies Oct. 15.The report is a smorgasbord of possibilities, designed to give the two jurisdictions plenty of choices for ways to cut the amount of waste plowed under landfills and burned, increase the amount recycled, and cut the cost of the whole process out of the property tax-funded portions of the budgets.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,SUN STAFF | April 25, 2004
After a lot of debate and a closer look at Westminster's proposed $28.6 million budget for the next fiscal year, city officials have decided against imposing an annual fee for residential trash collection. Instead, the city's spending plan - expected to be introduced at tomorrow's Common Council meeting - has been recalculated to make up about $300,000 in additional revenue that the "trash tax" would have generated. The city's finance department has made more cuts, dipped into the city's reserves for equipment and vehicles, and found previously uncollected sources of money.
NEWS
By Craig Timberg and Craig Timberg,SUN STAFF | January 30, 1998
In a light warm-up for the elections ahead, 10 candidates for five Howard County offices gently traded views last night on the county's perennial issues of growth, taxes and schools.One of the few issues to draw out differences among the candidates was the annual $125 trash tax paid by county homeowners since 1996.Councilman Dennis R. Schrader, a Republican running for county executive, has proposed killing the tax now that Howard has a revenue surplus of $12 million.But his rivals in that race, Republican Councilman Charles C. Feaga and the former police chief, James N. Robey, a Democrat, said the trash tax brings needed revenue.
NEWS
January 26, 1998
GIVE CHARLES I. ECKER credit for standing by his tax. The Howard County executive, who is challenging tax-cutter Ellen R. Sauerbrey for the Republican gubernatorial nomination, said last week he would retain the county's $125 trash-collection fee in his next budget despite a County Council member's call to eliminate it.The decision comes with some political risk. A Mason-Dixon Political/Media Research poll shows Mr. Ecker far behind Mrs. Sauerbrey. He stood to gain some brownie points among GOP voters by moving to eliminate this fee he created two years ago.Indeed, it would have been easy for him to erase the tax to raise his gubernatorial stock and let the chips fall on his successor.
NEWS
By Craig Timberg and Craig Timberg,SUN STAFF | January 6, 1998
The 1998 race for Howard County executive quickened yesterday as Councilman Dennis R. Schrader, a GOP candidate, proposed tossing the county's $125 trash tax in the garbage.Schrader says the county's $12 million surplus prompted his proposal. The trash tax -- imposed in 1996 to pay for the skyrocketing cost of trash collection and disposal -- generates about $8.4 million a year.Even if Schrader's proposal fails -- support was tepid yesterday -- it gives him a populist issue to distinguish him from GOP rival Councilman Charles C. Feaga, a fiscal conservative now in the uneasy position of opposing an election-year tax cut of about 6 percent.
NEWS
By Craig Timberg and Craig Timberg,SUN STAFF | March 20, 1998
An article in Friday's Howard County edition of The Sun misreported the amount that County Councilman Dennis R. Schrader has raised for his county executive campaign. The correct amount is $110,000.The Sun regrets the error.Howard County Councilman Dennis R. Schrader formally entered the race for county executive last night, promising to cut taxes, moderate growth and improve a school system already considered the best in the state.Schrader, 45, an ambitious engineer who lives in Columbia's Kings Contrivance village, is battling veteran Councilman Charles C. Feaga, 65, in what could be the most hotly contested primary election in the history of Howard's Republican Party.
NEWS
By Craig Timberg and Craig Timberg,SUN STAFF | January 23, 1998
In a speech that looked back more than ahead, Howard County Executive Charles I. Ecker yesterday trumpeted seven years of accomplishments and vowed to keep the trash tax in his final State of the County address.Ecker, a Republican who must step down when his second term ends in December, did not talk about his campaign for governor, other than a vague reference to changing his address so he could "take up water sports."But for an official who often seems uneasy making speeches, Ecker was relaxed and folksy in what amounted to a valedictory address to the Howard County Chamber of Commerce -- among his most loyal supporters.
NEWS
By Craig Timberg and Craig Timberg,SUN STAFF | March 3, 1998
The push to repeal Howard County's $125 trash tax died in the County Council last night, but the issue is likely to return as part of Councilman Dennis R. Schrader's campaign for county executive."
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | May 18, 1999
At a hearing last night in Ellicott City, Howard County Republicans attacked a proposal by County Council Democrats to raise the property tax rate 2 cents to provide extra funds for education.County GOP party Chairman Louis Pope of Laurel called the proposal a "horrible precedent."Gregory Fox, first vice president of the Howard County Republican Club and unsuccessful County Council candidate last year, assailed Democrats as "tax and spend liberals."At the hearing, which was sparsely attended, the council's two GOP members announced plans to introduce a budget amendment that would cut the spending of other agencies to raise money for education.
NEWS
August 30, 1998
A. Kittleman: Repeal trash tax at first chanceAlthough I appreciate The Sun's Aug. 20 endorsement of my candidacy, and its confidence in my campaign, I must clarify one point. From the beginning of my campaign, I have consistently stated that I will work to repeal the trash tax.Even though our ability to repeal or reduce the trash tax will be dependent on the county's future spending and revenues, I want The Sun and the citizens of the 5th Councilmanic District to know that I will aggressively look for ways to eliminate or lessen the trash tax burden.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN STAFF | April 21, 1998
Howard County Executive Charles I. Ecker observed an election year tradition yesterday by offering a modest income tax cut and substantial spending increases in his final proposed budget of $398 million.Ecker, a Republican running for governor this year, would drop the county's piggyback tax from 50 percent of the state income tax to 48 percent. County fiscal officials say this would save the average taxpayer $51.Ecker's budget also calls for beefing up public safety and criminal justice spending, with 20 more firefighters, additional personnel in the state's attorney's office and $3 million to nab red-light runners.
NEWS
By Craig Timberg and Craig Timberg,SUN STAFF | March 20, 1998
An article in Friday's Howard County edition of The Sun misreported the amount that County Councilman Dennis R. Schrader has raised for his county executive campaign. The correct amount is $110,000.The Sun regrets the error.Howard County Councilman Dennis R. Schrader formally entered the race for county executive last night, promising to cut taxes, moderate growth and improve a school system already considered the best in the state.Schrader, 45, an ambitious engineer who lives in Columbia's Kings Contrivance village, is battling veteran Councilman Charles C. Feaga, 65, in what could be the most hotly contested primary election in the history of Howard's Republican Party.
NEWS
By Craig Timberg and Craig Timberg,SUN STAFF | March 3, 1998
The push to repeal Howard County's $125 trash tax died in the County Council last night, but the issue is likely to return as part of Councilman Dennis R. Schrader's campaign for county executive."
NEWS
By Craig Timberg and Craig Timberg,SUN STAFF | January 30, 1998
In a light warm-up for the elections ahead, 10 candidates for five Howard County offices gently traded views last night on the county's perennial issues of growth, taxes and schools.One of the few issues to draw out differences among the candidates was the annual $125 trash tax paid by county homeowners since 1996.Councilman Dennis R. Schrader, a Republican running for county executive, has proposed killing the tax now that Howard has a revenue surplus of $12 million.But his rivals in that race, Republican Councilman Charles C. Feaga and the former police chief, James N. Robey, a Democrat, said the trash tax brings needed revenue.
NEWS
August 30, 1998
A. Kittleman: Repeal trash tax at first chanceAlthough I appreciate The Sun's Aug. 20 endorsement of my candidacy, and its confidence in my campaign, I must clarify one point. From the beginning of my campaign, I have consistently stated that I will work to repeal the trash tax.Even though our ability to repeal or reduce the trash tax will be dependent on the county's future spending and revenues, I want The Sun and the citizens of the 5th Councilmanic District to know that I will aggressively look for ways to eliminate or lessen the trash tax burden.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | May 18, 1999
At a hearing last night in Ellicott City, Howard County Republicans attacked a proposal by County Council Democrats to raise the property tax rate 2 cents to provide extra funds for education.County GOP party Chairman Louis Pope of Laurel called the proposal a "horrible precedent."Gregory Fox, first vice president of the Howard County Republican Club and unsuccessful County Council candidate last year, assailed Democrats as "tax and spend liberals."At the hearing, which was sparsely attended, the council's two GOP members announced plans to introduce a budget amendment that would cut the spending of other agencies to raise money for education.
NEWS
January 26, 1998
GIVE CHARLES I. ECKER credit for standing by his tax. The Howard County executive, who is challenging tax-cutter Ellen R. Sauerbrey for the Republican gubernatorial nomination, said last week he would retain the county's $125 trash-collection fee in his next budget despite a County Council member's call to eliminate it.The decision comes with some political risk. A Mason-Dixon Political/Media Research poll shows Mr. Ecker far behind Mrs. Sauerbrey. He stood to gain some brownie points among GOP voters by moving to eliminate this fee he created two years ago.Indeed, it would have been easy for him to erase the tax to raise his gubernatorial stock and let the chips fall on his successor.
NEWS
By Craig Timberg and Craig Timberg,SUN STAFF | January 23, 1998
In a speech that looked back more than ahead, Howard County Executive Charles I. Ecker yesterday trumpeted seven years of accomplishments and vowed to keep the trash tax in his final State of the County address.Ecker, a Republican who must step down when his second term ends in December, did not talk about his campaign for governor, other than a vague reference to changing his address so he could "take up water sports."But for an official who often seems uneasy making speeches, Ecker was relaxed and folksy in what amounted to a valedictory address to the Howard County Chamber of Commerce -- among his most loyal supporters.
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