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NEWS
March 4, 1993
Half the members of the ad hoc Countywide Solid Waste Study Committee apparently believe that 43,000 Carroll County households should be paying a special "tax" of $1.4 million to subsidize the county's small trash haulers. That is the only conclusion one can draw from the committee's decision not to recommend changes in Carroll's trash collection system.That extra cost -- which can amount to as much as $96 a year for each household using a private hauler -- is the difference between the current collection system and the cost of the county contracting with private haulers.
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NEWS
June 27, 2004
HCC foundation ponders buying historic estate The historic Belmont Conference Center in Elkridge could have new owners this fall and a future as a moneymaker and teaching space for Howard Community College. The Howard Community College Educational Foundation, a nonprofit corporation that raises funds for the college, is considering purchasing the 18th-century estate. Owned by the American Chemical Society, Belmont offers accommodations for conferences, weddings and retreats. The property is listed for $4.3 million.
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NEWS
May 27, 1994
Carroll's county commissioners are scheduled to meet with private garbage haulers at 3 p.m. today to discuss whether the haulers will collect yard waste and whether they will consider charging by the bag instead of by the ton.Commissioner Julia W. Gouge, who insisted on scheduling the meeting, said she would not make a decision about whether to increase the county's fee for dumping in landfills until after she talked with haulers.Comptroller Eugene C. Curfman has recommended increasing the tipping fee of $40 per ton by $9.05 per ton.If the increase is approved, it will take effect July 1, the first day of fiscal 1995.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | June 22, 2004
Tired of nightly noise from big trash trucks and clanging metal trash containers at fast-food restaurants and shopping centers, residents of Elkridge and Marriottsville gave up trying to get the attention of commercial trash haulers in favor of a group with much more finely attuned ears - their elected County Council. About two dozen residents came to the council's monthly public hearing in Ellicott City last night to support a bill that would restrict trash haulers' hours to 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. for businesses within 500 feet of a residence.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | May 28, 1997
The owner of two trash-hauling firms suspected of bribing scale operators to undercharge him at the Millersville landfill pleaded guilty yesterday to conspiracy and agreed to pay $500,000 in restitution to Anne Arundel County.In exchange, prosecutors dropped three related charges against Donald E. Warrener, 33, of Sparks and all charges against his companies, D&J Inc. and Don's Trash Services Inc.The companies still exist but are not operating, said Bruce Lamdin, one of Warrener's lawyers.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | October 22, 1996
A former scale operator at the county's Millersville Landfill and two trash haulers were indicted yesterday by an Anne Arundel grand jury on charges they bilked taxpayers out of $5 million in fees.Jennifer Allison of Chester, a former scale operator at the landfill, and trash haulers Don Warrener of Baltimore County and Michael Gunther of Severn each were indicted on charges of felony theft, bribery and conspiracy to commit theft.County officials said Allison, who recorded the weight of trash brought by haulers, accepted money from Warrener and Gunther to record lesser weights for trash they dropped off at the landfill.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | December 23, 1992
Two trash haulers face fines and suspensions of their licenses to operate in Carroll for failing to comply with the county's recycling ordinance, a county official said yesterday.The firms -- Browning Ferris Industries of Baltimore and Benchoff Trash Service of Westminster -- have each been sent a "notice of violation" and have until today to appeal the suspensions, said county Comptroller Eugene C. Curfman.Unless the firms appeal, their licenses to operate in the county will be suspended, effective Jan. 1, he said.
NEWS
By Mark Guidera | November 10, 1991
In the coming months, Harford residents and businesses will start seeing a deluge of materials espousing the virtues of recycling.What they won't be told in all the hype -- from an elementary school contest to pick a mascot for the recycling program to brochures explaining how to sort recyclables in blue bags -- is that the fees they pay trash haulers will rise because of the program.Trash haulers will be passing on to their customers the county's new $60-per-ton tipping fee. For years, Harford trash haulers have been able to drop off garbage for the county to landfill or burn without paying for that service, a windfall of sorts.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff writer | May 6, 1992
WESTMINSTER -- Most who voiced concerns at a public hearing last night didn't object to recycling, but to other aspects of proposed revision to the county's Solid Waste Management Ordinance.Boy Scouts and church officials, as well as trash haulers, who showed up at the Multi-Purpose Center gymnasium objected to a plan that would require non-profit groups to have a county permit to sell aluminum cans.Under the proposed recycling program, set to begin July 1, trash haulers would pick up recyclables and drop them off at a designated recycling facility.
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff Writer | May 17, 1992
Carroll mayors criticized the county commissioners Thursday for reversing their original proposal to make recycling mandatory and advocating a waste-disposal plan the mayors say favors trash haulers over residents.Westminster Mayor W. Benjamin Brown, designated by Carroll's eight mayors as their spokesman on the issue, re-emphasized to the commissioners that trash collection and recycling bills for residents could be sliced in half if the board pursued a more efficient and cost-effective system.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,SUN STAFF | November 26, 2003
Carroll County would pay more to get rid of its trash starting next year under a proposed agreement with a hauling company. Under a proposal presented yesterday to the Carroll commissioners, the price to the county to ship its trash to a disposal facility in central Virginia would go up $2.73 a ton, to $45.24, next year. The county would pay Waste Management of Maryland $3.94 million to dispose of a projected 87,000 tons of garbage. The proposed five-year agreement includes price increases each subsequent year.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | March 28, 2003
Fed up with a gypsy trash hauling and transfer business that has set up camp in several rural neighborhoods during the past year, Anne Arundel County is preparing to take the owners to court. Mettie M. Smith, an assistant county attorney, said she will seek an injunction in District Court ordering Kendall O. and Dawn M. Baldwin of Tracy's Landing to quit hauling trash and conducting waste transfer activities at locations in Deale and Tracy's Landing. The couple did not return several phone calls seeking comment this week.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | January 1, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Waste Management Inc., the largest U.S. trash-disposal company, said yesterday that it plans to complete its $1.1 billion acquisition of rival Eastern Environmental Services Inc. after settling charges lodged by state and federal antitrust officials.The settlement, which resolves a legal dispute that had blocked the acquisition for six weeks, clears the way for the companies to close the transaction.The accord allows Waste Management to refocus its attention on building its share of the $40 billion North American waste disposal business.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | January 1, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Waste Management Inc., the largest U.S. trash-disposal company, said yesterday that it plans to complete its $1.1 billion acquisition of rival Eastern Environmental Services Inc. after settling charges lodged by state and federal antitrust officials.The settlement, which resolves a legal dispute that had blocked the acquisition for six weeks, clears the way for the companies to close the transaction.The accord allows Waste Management to refocus its attention on building its share of the $40 billion North American waste disposal business.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | September 17, 1997
The owner of two trash-hauling firms was sentenced Monday to six months in prison and five years of probation for his role in a bribery scheme at Anne Arundel County's Millersville landfill.County Circuit Judge Clayton D. Greene also ordered Donald E. Warrener, 33, to reimburse the county $500,000 -- a sum that prosecutors called a conservative estimate of revenue lost due to the scheme in which scale operators undercharged Warrener for trash brought to the landfill.Warrener, a resident of Sparks in Baltimore County, pleaded guilty in May to conspiracy in exchange for having three other charges against him and all charges against his companies, D&J Inc. and Don's Trash Services Inc., dropped.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | May 28, 1997
The owner of two trash-hauling firms suspected of bribing scale operators to undercharge him at the Millersville landfill pleaded guilty yesterday to conspiracy and agreed to pay $500,000 in restitution to Anne Arundel County.In exchange, prosecutors dropped three related charges against Donald E. Warrener, 33, of Sparks and all charges against his companies, D&J Inc. and Don's Trash Services Inc.The companies still exist but are not operating, said Bruce Lamdin, one of Warrener's lawyers.
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff writer | May 1, 1991
A Union Bridge-based railroad wants to add a new product to the tonsof cement, coal, lumber and other materials it hauls -- trash generated by county residents.In a letter to the County Commissioners, the president of Maryland Midland Railway Inc. suggested that the railroad ultimately could reduce trash collection bills for county residents and landfill fees for commercial haulers.The railroad has offered to transport trash to Northern Landfill near Westminster and Phoenix Recycling Inc. in Finksburg from transfer stations that could be established along the tracks.
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff writer | April 19, 1992
The county commissioners are pursuing recycling and trash collectionplans that defy "common sense" and will inflate costs for residents,Westminster Mayor W. Benjamin Brown told two board members at a Maryland Municipal League meeting Thursday night.Repeating an argument he has made several times, Brown urged the commissioners to create a combined countywide trash collection and recycling service to increase efficiency and lower costs for all Carroll residents."It will be a real eye-opener when you see what the average person in the county is going to pay for trash collection after July 1," Brown warned the commissioners at MML's Carroll chapter meeting at Manchester Town Hall.
NEWS
January 8, 1997
BALTIMORE COUNTY'S archaic system of trash hauling, whereby routes are plums handed out by the county executive without contracts or competitive bidding, has been around for generations and reported on countless times.Each time, the public has responded with a big yawn. Trash isn't piling up on the sidewalk; property taxes aren't going up. Absent pressure from citizens, elected leaders have responded, "If it ain't broke, why fix it?"Here's why: This trash-collection system carries the potential for abuse, even if abuse is not occurring now. History shows that, with few exceptions, taxpayers are best served when government work is awarded to the lowest bidder.
NEWS
By Scott Wilson and Scott Wilson,SUN STAFF | November 5, 1996
A county grand jury indicted five Maryland companies yesterday on charges that they participated in a bribery ring at the Millersville landfill that prosecutors say has cost Anne Arundel taxpayers $5 million.The indictments, filed late yesterday afternoon, are part of a widening criminal prosecution involving companies and county employees working at the landfill from January 1992 through June 1995.Last month, the grand jury indicted owners of two trash-hauling companies and a former landfill scale operator on bribery, theft and conspiracy charges.
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