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NEWS
February 18, 2013
Let me see if I understand this. Robber-baron Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, a Democrat, proposes new save-the-city trash removal fees which apparently are not currently covered by our already burdensome taxes ("Trash fee, job cuts urged," Feb. 12)? If so, were we getting city trash removal for free all these decades? Donald Holland, Baltimore
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NEWS
February 22, 2013
Residents of the city are used to surviving under the burden of a high cost of living index. We are also used to the heavy-handedness of government in a region dependent on government employment levels and proximity to Washington. Private-sector employees, who do not receive automatic yearly raises and are not cushioned from the real economy by a blanket of comprehensive government fringe benefits, read the newspaper every day in dread of learning about the next government drain on their over-extended pocketbooks.
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NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | February 13, 2013
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said Wednesday that charging residents for trash collection would actually help the city attract new residents because it could reduce its property tax rate. Defending a hotly debated proposal in her State of the City speech, the mayor said imposing such a fee while reducing property taxes would help Baltimore compete with surrounding counties. "Many jurisdictions have a fee for trash service," Rawlings-Blake said. "It's not included as part of their property tax. Their property tax is either artificially low or ours is artificially high.
NEWS
February 18, 2013
Let me see if I understand this. Robber-baron Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, a Democrat, proposes new save-the-city trash removal fees which apparently are not currently covered by our already burdensome taxes ("Trash fee, job cuts urged," Feb. 12)? If so, were we getting city trash removal for free all these decades? Donald Holland, Baltimore
NEWS
By Dan Morse and Dan Morse,SUN STAFF | May 21, 1996
The way state Del. Shane Pendergrass saw it, a 21-cent property tax increase would have drawn scores of unhappy residents to last night's public hearing before the Howard County Council.As it was, only a scattering of people came to protest a proposed $125 trash fee. But Pendergrass, a Democrat from Columbia, says the fee amounts to a 21-cent property tax boost for the owner of a $150,000 house."It's a big tax increase," Pendergrass said of the trash fee, which was proposed by Republican County Executive Charles I. Ecker.
NEWS
By Dan Morse and Dan Morse,SUN STAFF | February 22, 1996
Of the 30 Howard County residents who spoke against a proposed $125 trash fee last night, no one was more candid about her own garbage than 70-year-old Fronda Port.Ms. Port told the County Council that because she recycled as much as possible she should not have to pay $125 while others don't do their share.Then Ms. Port described this week's waste stream at her Kings Contrivance home: one milk carton (collapsed), one orange juice carton (collapsed), several paper napkins and tissues, small miscellaneous items, "and a chicken bone."
NEWS
May 22, 1996
DEL. SHANE PENDERGRASS' assertion that the Howard County trash fee is merely a Republican tax increase hidden in a Hefty bag is, well, garbage.County Executive Charles I. Ecker hardly gained standing with voters by creating the $125 trash fee. Ms. Pendergrass, a Columbia Democrat, claimed that the Republican executive and GOP-majority County Council pushed the fee because it was more politically palatable than an equivalent 21-cent increase in the property...
NEWS
By Dan Morse and Dan Morse,SUN STAFF | May 24, 1996
The Howard County Council passed yesterday County Executive Charles I. Ecker's budget for fiscal 1997 -- a budget that, as expected, holds the line on property taxes but hits county residents with a yearly trash fee of $125 per household.The council made no cuts in Ecker's $426 million spending plan during four weeks of budget hearings.Council Republicans said yesterday that there was no room to cut. Ecker, also a Republican, had presented a lean budget that trimmed current spending in many departments, they said.
NEWS
July 30, 1996
JULY DIDN'T JUST bring sweet corn and lazy days by the pool to Howard County. It also brought a new $125-a-year garbage collection fee.The fee makes sense, and not just because of the $8.1 million in revenue it will produce. Howard is running out of landfill space and will have to pay to haul its trash to some other location. The fee, and an accompanying four-can limit on the number of trash receptacles per household, are intended to change behavior. People are expected to pay more attention to what and how much they throw away.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff writer | March 25, 1992
County Executive Charles I. Ecker wants the County Council to hold up his proposed $70 trash fee while he looks at other options for solving the county's growing garbage problem.Ecker said Monday he will appoint a trash commission to help him explore those options and will invite the council to nominate some of the members.Initially, Ecker tried to solve the problem on his own. But his plan to charge a $70 fee for trash collection and disposal while reducing the property tax rate 7 cents was condemned at a public hearing last week.
NEWS
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2013
WEATHER: Sunny, with highs near 50 . TRAFFIC: Icy conditions are causing major problems for today's commute. Check our traffic updates for the latest. TOP NEWS Top police commanders not aware of training where officer was shot : Top Baltimore police commanders, including the director of the agency's training academy, were unaware that training exercises were being conducted at an Owings Mills facility where a rookie University of Maryland officer was shot in the head and critically wounded, officials said.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | February 13, 2013
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said Wednesday that charging residents for trash collection would actually help the city attract new residents because it could reduce its property tax rate. Defending a hotly debated proposal in her State of the City speech, the mayor said imposing such a fee while reducing property taxes would help Baltimore compete with surrounding counties. "Many jurisdictions have a fee for trash service," Rawlings-Blake said. "It's not included as part of their property tax. Their property tax is either artificially low or ours is artificially high.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2013
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake called Monday for "bold reforms" to fix a looming financial shortfall, including requiring more city workers to contribute to their retirement fund, charging residents for trash collection, asking firefighters to work longer hours and cutting the city workforce by 10 percent over time. In return, she said, the city could use the savings to raise employee salaries and cut property taxes by 22 percent - 50 cents per $100 of assessed value - over the next decade.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2011
Baltimore will continue to offer free curbside bulk trash collection through June 30, 2012, the Department of Public Works confirmed Friday. The city's tight budget led DPW to review whether a fee should be charged for bulk trash pickup during this fiscal year. In mid-October, DPW spokeswoman Celeste Amato said that a fee would be unlikely before fiscal 2012. Baltimore residents will receive notice of any changes in bulk trash service, DPW said. To schedule bulk pickup, residents should call 311 at least three days prior to their neighborhood's regular bulk collection day. No more than three items will be collected for a single residence.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2011
Howard County's trash disposal honeymoon is nearing an end — which likely means higher fees for residents — but public employee pensions are sound, county officials told a citizens committee studying levels of spending and borrowing for the next fiscal year. County budget director Raymond S. Wacks wanted the group, which met at the George Howard Building on Wednesday morning, to review opportunities, like the influx of federal defense-related jobs in and around Fort Meade, and potential challenges, like the cost of trash disposal and employee pensions.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Sun reporter | May 7, 2008
As they argued over a proposed $50 annual trash fee increase yesterday, Howard County Council members were given something else to consider -- the total tax burden of county residents compared with those in eight surrounding counties. County budget director Raymond S. Wacks argued that based on his comparison of the nine central Maryland counties, Howard residents pay less in combined taxes and fees than people in six other jurisdictions. Only Baltimore and Anne Arundel counties were lower.
NEWS
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2013
WEATHER: Sunny, with highs near 50 . TRAFFIC: Icy conditions are causing major problems for today's commute. Check our traffic updates for the latest. TOP NEWS Top police commanders not aware of training where officer was shot : Top Baltimore police commanders, including the director of the agency's training academy, were unaware that training exercises were being conducted at an Owings Mills facility where a rookie University of Maryland officer was shot in the head and critically wounded, officials said.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Evening Sun Staff | March 18, 1992
After last night, Howard County Executive Charles I. Ecker is going to have to devise a new way to deal with the county's trash problem.Mr. Ecker had hoped to collect $70 from each household for trash collection and reduce the county's property tax rate 7 cents.But residents told the County Council last night they wanted no part of the idea.County Public Works Director James I. Irvin said fees are necessary because the county's trash costs are escalating. Unless the county develops a new source of revenue, it will not be able to afford trash collection and disposal, he said.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Sun reporter | April 9, 2008
Most Howard County residents would pay about $50 a year more for trash and recycling services in County Executive Ken Ulman's upcoming budget request, now that a County Council bill combining those services has been approved. The increase for western county residents would be about $15 less because they don't receive yard waste collection service, Ulman said. If the council agrees to Ulman's proposal, Ulman plans to use some of the fee increase and general fund money to pay for thousands of heavy-duty wheeled recycling bins for residents countywide as part of a long-term strategy to reduce the cost of refuse disposal.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | March 16, 2005
When he proposed a $125-a-house trash fee nine years ago, Howard County Executive Charles I. Ecker offered a slight property tax cut to soften the blow, though he later dropped the idea. Now, as county officials consider a possible general tax cut, the trash fee is no longer raising enough money to pay its way, and the county's dedicated fire tax isn't far behind. The trends put county officials in an awkward position as they prepare a budget for the fiscal year that will start July 1. Should the county raise specialty taxes when general tax rates might go down?
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