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Trash Disposal

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NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | March 10, 1996
For six years, the County Commissioners have wrestled with how to handle the county's long-term needs for disposing of solid waste.A Friday symposium on solid waste was intended to aid the commissioners and public works officials in deciding about the future of trash disposal in the county.Both county landfills -- Northern, east of Westminster, and Hoods Mill, in Woodbine -- will be at capacity in 20 years."It's a forum to bring together those technologies that have been looked at and studied and let the commissioners, the community and county staff hear what they have to offer us and why we should select their technology," said Gary Horst, the county's deputy director of public works.
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NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | April 6, 2013
Shirley Gregory of Dundalk takes pride in her home, but unwelcome visitors have sometimes thwarted efforts to keep her yard tidy. When she and her husband had a brick patio laid, it wasn't long until the bricks were caving into the ground. Rats had burrowed in a nearby yard and dug tunnels into Gregory's property. "I was, like, shocked - that's what a rat did," said Gregory, president of the St. Helena Community Association. "Well, more than one rat. Quite a few rats. " Gregory was one of more than 100 people who turned out Saturday morning for a community cleanup.
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NEWS
By Martin C. Evans | December 21, 1990
Baltimore-area government officials met yesterday at City Hall to eat some lasagna and talk a little trash. After all, they said, trash is what they have in common.Mountains of trash -- trash that costs their governments tons of money to burn in public incinerators or bury in increasingly scarce landfills.Members of a joint Baltimore City/Baltimore County task force invited officials from Harford, Howard, Carroll and Anne Arundel counties to urge them to consider imposing user fees and taxes to shift the cost of trash disposal onto the shoulders of the people and businesses that generate the most trash.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2011
Howard County will soon allow residents to add banana peels, egg shells and even old pizza boxes to their recyclables, becoming one of the first East Coast localities to start a large-scale composting program. The county is asking almost 5,000 Elkridge and Ellicott City residents this month to participate in the recycling program, which will begin in September and turn more than 20 percent of landfill waste into compost, reducing disposal costs. "We will make a product versus waste," said Evelyn Tomlin, chief of the county Bureau of Environmental Services.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff Writer | February 16, 1993
Anne Arundel officials, who spurned use of Baltimore's BRESCO incinerator 10 years ago, now are looking at the possibility of building their own trash-to-energy plant.A draft plan outlining the county's trash disposal needs for the next 20 years concludes that relying exclusively on landfills is no longer adequate. It says the county needs more recycling and facilities that either compost trash or burn it.No longer is there "going to be some magic hole in the ground where everything goes," said Richard Waesche with the county Department of Utilities.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Sun Staff Writer | June 10, 1994
It's high time the county commissioners made a decision on how the county will collect and dispose of its waste in the future, some of Carroll's town officials told them yesterday."
NEWS
March 2, 1993
County officials yesterday detailed Carroll's trash disposal efforts during the second meeting of a recently appointed waste-to-energy committee.The county last year generated some 122,000 tons of trash and recycled about 10 percent of that volume, Keith Kirschnick, public works director, told the committee.The committee is studying incineration as a disposal method to augment recycling and landfilling.About 28 percent of the county's trash was dumped at the Hoods Mill landfill in South Carroll and 72 percent was buried at the Northern landfill off Route 140, just east of Westminster, Mr. Kirschnick said.
NEWS
By Michael A. Fletcher and Michael A. Fletcher,Staff Writer | March 26, 1992
Residents who live near Baltimore's industrial underbelly voiced overwhelming support last night for a bill that would impose a five-year moratorium on the construction of incinerators in the city.At a packed City Council hearing on the bill, supporters said a moratorium is needed to give city officials time to sort out Baltimore's trash-disposal needs and to encourage recycling. They also said they were tired of their neighborhoods being used as a dumping ground for the region."Why not think about what is best for Baltimore?"
NEWS
May 25, 1993
Among decisions and orders issued by the Supreme Court yesterday:RULINGSFBI files. The court ruled unanimously that the FBI has no legal right to keep secret the files it has of every interview by agents during a criminal investigation. The court, ruling in a New Jersey policeman's murder case, said the FBI must justify keeping secret any reports on interviews when it gave no specific promise of confidentiality to the source. .CASES TO BE HEARDJudicial bias. The court said it would review, in its next term starting in October, a claim by a Baltimore peace activist, his brother in California and a Catholic priest from Georgia that a federal judge was biased against them and should have been disqualified from their trial for splattering blood at an Army education center at Fort Benning, Ga., in 1990.
NEWS
April 1, 1992
There are routines of life, some maybe even frightening, that eventually become so dated as to seem quaint or silly years later: cranking an automobile to start it; huddling beside the family radio for a presidential "fireside chat"; lining up in school hallways to practice civil defense drills. Some day you will add this one to the list: blithely taking out your trash.As Maryland jurisdictions inch closer to the January 1994 deadline for meeting state-mandated levels of recycling, various trash disposal programs will be introduced and refined.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2011
Howard County's trash disposal honeymoon is nearing an end — which likely means higher fees for residents — but public employee pensions are sound, county officials told a citizens committee studying levels of spending and borrowing for the next fiscal year. County budget director Raymond S. Wacks wanted the group, which met at the George Howard Building on Wednesday morning, to review opportunities, like the influx of federal defense-related jobs in and around Fort Meade, and potential challenges, like the cost of trash disposal and employee pensions.
NEWS
April 21, 2010
Tourism is going green. In Virginia Beach, businesses clamor to be designated as eco-friendly under a statewide program. At Baltimore's Fairfield Inn & Suites, the staff wear uniforms made from recycled bottles. Small wonder travel agents are getting requests from customers who are interested in green travel options. Even if that's only a small percentage, the impact could be enormous in a $645 billion U.S. travel industry. That's what makes it surprising that Ocean City, one of Maryland's most popular tourism destinations, recently decided to end its trash recycling program as of next Monday.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Sun Reporter | March 28, 2008
An Ulman administration bill seeking to shift recycling expenses into the county's trash budget could lead to higher fees for residents. The measure would move recycling collection costs from the general budget to a dedicated trash fund supported by a $175 annual fee paid by taxpayers. In addition to combining similar functions, the purpose is to raise awareness and use of recycling, County Executive Ken Ulman said. "What goes from your house to the curb should be in the same fee," Ulman said this week.
NEWS
September 25, 2003
Anne Arundel County will open additional trash-disposal sites in 23 communities today, including several damaged by Tropical Storm Isabel, to aid in the disposal of storm debris. These sites will be open during daylight hours today through Sunday, county officials said: Bayside Beach, at Lake and Bodkin View drives. Venice on the Bay at Arundel Road and Lake Road. Brooklyn Park, at Valley Road and 10th Avenue. Arundel on the Bay, at Magnolia and Cohasset avenues. Bay Ridge, at River Drive and Clark Path.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,SUN STAFF | August 7, 2003
The city is embarking on the second phase of a struggling effort to combat rats attracted to the garbage illegally dumped throughout the city. The Board of Estimates approved $320,000 yesterday to buy 55,334 trash cans that will be distributed directly to residents who will also receive information on proper trash disposal from the Mayor's Office of Neighborhoods. Since December the city has distributed nearly 55,000 of the same black trash cans, bearing the word "Believe," to the neighborhoods of Oliver, Washington Village, Park Heights and Sandtown/Winchester.
NEWS
May 14, 1997
THE FUTURE of trash disposal in Carroll needs to be decided right now. The county has had enough years of temporizing discussion, delays in studying responsive proposals from bidders, repeated calls for just one more idea, one lower bid.Northern Landfill will run out of capacity by year's end, unless a third disposal cell (at $3.5 million) is opened.The urgent decision boils down to building a transfer (collection) station there, from which to export Carroll's solid waste for disposal outside the county, or to open the new Northern cell, with work beginning in July.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Staff Writer | December 8, 1993
A citizen panel studying Anne Arundel County's future trash disposal alternatives has recommended construction of a waste-to-energy incinerator, either in the county, or jointly with a neighboring jurisdiction.The incinerator was the centerpiece of a set of recommendations the committee presented yesterday to County Executive Robert R. Neall. The other recommendations included encouraging more recycling of trash and construction debris, composting and regular disposal of household hazardous waste.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | April 23, 1997
Carroll's public works director told the County Commissioners yesterday that they must decide how to deal with the county's trash -- now and in the future -- within the next two months.The commissioners are weighing proposals from two nationally known disposal companies as alternatives to dumping trash at landfills.J. Michael Evans, the county's public works director, said that time is running out because both options involve time-consuming processes for getting county and state permits and because county landfill space is filling up."
NEWS
March 7, 1997
HOWARD COUNTY'S TRASH makes a pit stop in Annapolis Junction before it travels to a landfill in Kings County, Va. In Annapolis Junction, workers load waste from small trucks onto larger ones at a trash transfer station that is the handoff point before the trip to Virginia. The facility, owned by Houston-based USA Waste, is the only transfer site of its kind in the area.And that may be a problem.Indeed, Howard County benefits from USA Waste's low fees. The company last year easily beat competitors in bidding for the county's residential trash disposal for the next six years.
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