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NEWS
November 7, 2012
Daniel Buccino's op-ed piece, "Does Baltimore think trash cans cause litter?" (Nov. 6) spotlights an illogical trash policy that has plagued this city for at least 20 years. There used to be big trash cans at many trail-heads leading down to Liberty Reservoir, one of three large lakes whose contents and wooded surroundings are managed by the city and are Baltimore's clean water source. In my book "Soldiers Delight Journal," I mentioned picking up trash with my wife around one of Liberty's lovely coves to improve its beauty and purity.
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NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger and The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2014
More than 25,000 Baltimore households are included in a new alley sweeping program that kicks off Aug. 18 and is intended to help clean up the city and decrease the rat population in some neighborhoods. Residents will receive fliers beginning Monday to describe the new program, which starts in the Belair-Edison neighborhood in the Northeast and Panway-Braddish neighborhood in the West. The city spent $525,000 for the purchase of three street sweeping vehicles, which will remove loose trash, grit, dirt, oil and other chemicals.
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NEWS
November 25, 2013
Giving free garbage containers to city residents is a good idea, but I hope the new cans will be made of titanium, electrified with 15,000 volts and come with padlocked lids and a Doberman ( "Some in city to get trash cans on wheels to fight rats," Nov. 19). Otherwise they won't be rat-proof. The rats in "Gucci Hampden," where I live, have chewed their way through three heavy plastic cans in the past six months. They will always find a way in, so I refuse to buy any more trash cans.
SPORTS
By Nate Rabner, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2014
Since May 2, boaters and anglers trying to use a Gunpowder Falls State Park parking lot in Kingsville have encountered a padlocked gate. Signs in English and Spanish flanking the gate say the Jones Road lot is closed through Sept. 1 to “allow the park's natural resources to recover from heavy use.” “We were noticing over time that the carrying capacity at Jones Road was being exceeded,” said Sarah Witcher, northern-area manager for the park. “Way more people were coming than the area was originally designed for, and as a result, it would have a number of impacts both on the environment and the surrounding community,” including littering, trampled plants and cars parked on neighborhood streets.
NEWS
By Daniel Buccino | November 5, 2012
On Oct. 22, the Baltimore City Council passed a bill confirming my long-held belief that people in Baltimore actually think trash cans cause litter. Though the bill appears simply to criminalize the dumping of excess quantities of noxious waste in public trash receptacles, it echoes many conversations I have had over the years asking about putting more trash cans around the city. Repeatedly, I would hear - from fellow citizens, to small shopkeepers, to contacts with well-placed staff in the Department of Public Works and the City Council - variations on this theme: "The more trash cans we put out, the more people dump in and around them and the messier things get, and neighbors ask us to remove them.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2012
Annapolis officials are considering a plan to remove trash cans from city parks, a strategy they say would save money and could keep public spaces cleaner. Without trash cans, officials said, visitors would take refuse with them or learn to not produce it in the first place. Other parks across the country have adopted such "trash-free" policies, including all Maryland state parks and scores of national parks, which urge visitors to "leave no trace. " In Annapolis, the idea comes amid broader changes that, for the first time, shifted city trash service into private hands to cut costs.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2013
Baltimore plans to give more than 9,000 households huge plastic trash cans on wheels - complete with tracking devices to prevent theft - under a pilot program that, if successful, could lead to a $10 million citywide expansion. The plan is aimed at fighting both litter and rats. The city's Board of Estimates is expected to approve the $578,000 test venture Wednesday. "Not having a trash can is actually a very big factor in rat infestation," said Valentina Ukwuoma, head of the Bureau of Solid Waste.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | June 4, 1994
I am playing the trash can game again.It goes like this: Somebody steals your trash cans. You prowl distant alleys vowing to find the missing cans. Eventually you call off your search and buy new cans. But you don't do this too quickly. If new cans appear too soon after the old ones have disappeared, the thieves are likely to return to the scene of the crime, and grab the new ones.This is either the third or fourth time in 16 years that my trash cans have been stolen. Looking at things on the bright side, my trash cans have an average life-span of about four years.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Baltimore County Bureau of The Sun | March 15, 1991
Call this the case of the $538 trash cans.Baltimore County Council Chairman Douglas B. Riley, R-4th, says he's mystified as to why the county plans to pay that much for trash cans on Eastern Boulevard in Essex.He asked central services director John E. Lutz Tuesday to look into why the county agreed in a Jan. 25 memorandum to reimburse the Essex Development Corp. $22,828 for replacing 38 trash cans along a six-block stretch. The price includes$20,444 for new cans and $2,384 for removing the old ones.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,SUN STAFF | August 7, 2003
The city is embarking on the second phase of a struggling effort to combat rats attracted to the garbage illegally dumped throughout the city. The Board of Estimates approved $320,000 yesterday to buy 55,334 trash cans that will be distributed directly to residents who will also receive information on proper trash disposal from the Mayor's Office of Neighborhoods. Since December the city has distributed nearly 55,000 of the same black trash cans, bearing the word "Believe," to the neighborhoods of Oliver, Washington Village, Park Heights and Sandtown/Winchester.
NEWS
April 14, 2014
Michael Hankin's comments on the new street sweeping program that has now been initiated in Baltimore are very much appreciated, but the effort will not turn out to be the panacea for the trash problem in city that he suggests ( "A clean sweep," April 7). The view that cooperation rather than enforcement is the best way to clean our Inner Harbor of trash leaves a lot to be desired. His assumption is that most of the trash is on the streets of Baltimore and that street sweeping will be the factor that reduces trash going into the Harbor.
NEWS
By Mitchell MacNaughton | February 10, 2014
A used diaper, a half-eaten banana and a ripped shirt. The significance of these three items could be anything, depending on the person. But for me, these random objects represent a glimpse of the trash that could be littering my neighborhood at any given moment. Putting it simply: Baltimore is filthy. It's the type of filth so impressive that Travel + Leisure awarded it the 3rd dirtiest American city in 2012 (behind No. 1 New York and No. 2 New Orleans). To put it in perspective - if grime were an Olympic sport, Baltimore would be a medalist.
NEWS
January 3, 2014
We are fortunate to live in a green area of the city with fine schools, spacious homes and a strong sense of community. The new year begins a fresh slate. To improve the area, we might adopt a dozen resolutions. 1. Clean up our "lanes" (aka alleys).  To see an exemplary lane, visit Hollywood Lane. Parallel to Roland Avenue and Long Lane, Hollywood runs for one block, between Kenwood and Ridgewood Roads. No trash, organic debris, leaves or grass clippings clutter the roadway. Recycling bins and trash cans sit with lids on next to garages.
NEWS
November 25, 2013
Giving free garbage containers to city residents is a good idea, but I hope the new cans will be made of titanium, electrified with 15,000 volts and come with padlocked lids and a Doberman ( "Some in city to get trash cans on wheels to fight rats," Nov. 19). Otherwise they won't be rat-proof. The rats in "Gucci Hampden," where I live, have chewed their way through three heavy plastic cans in the past six months. They will always find a way in, so I refuse to buy any more trash cans.
NEWS
November 23, 2013
I applaud Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake for finally pushing an initiative that will attempt to fight the sanitation code violations that lead to rat infestation in many neighborhoods in the city ( "Free pilot program in two areas could be expanded," Nov 20). But I am afraid that distributing free trash cans to residents as a solution is probably way too little and way too late. I think this idea that the city will be able to track missing trash cans is pure fantasy. I suspect that in a city where getting an accurate water meter reading is nearly impossible, where miscalculated property taxes are routine, and where speeding tickets issued by cameras cannot hold up in court, that monitoring the whereabouts of trash cans will be pretty far down the list of concerns.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2013
Baltimore City will spend nearly $578,000 on a pilot program to provide large trash cans to 9,250 households, following approval by the city's spending panel Wednesday. The Board of Estimates awarded the project - designed to control the city's rat population and reduce litter - to the Statesville, N.C.-based company, Toter. If the program is successful, it could be scaled citywide for approximately $10 million, according to the city's Bureau of Solid Waste. Residents in two communities will receive the 65-gallon containers, which will come on wheels and be equipped with a tracking device.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | August 29, 1998
I WAS SITTING at the kitchen table sipping my morning coffee when I heard a noise in the alley. First I heard a "wham!" Then came the throaty sound of a car engine gaining momentum.Both sounds were familiar. The "wham" sounded like our metal trash can taking a hit. The engine sounded like the one in the family station wagon.Sure enough, when I investigated, I found that once again one of our cars had clobbered one of our trash cans. The can was dented, and I was deflated. My elaborate trash-can defense system had failed.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | February 13, 2012
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake on Tuesday will launch the city's Clean Community Competition, a block-by-block effort to rid neighborhoods of trash and to boost recycling. City officials and the Department of Public Works are challenging neighborhoods to spruce up the city. They are asking communities to join them in tackling sanitation problems and set a new standard for clean in Baltimore. All official community associations are eligible to participate in the friendly competition and vie for cash prizes that will benefit their neighborhoods.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2013
Baltimore plans to give more than 9,000 households huge plastic trash cans on wheels - complete with tracking devices to prevent theft - under a pilot program that, if successful, could lead to a $10 million citywide expansion. The plan is aimed at fighting both litter and rats. The city's Board of Estimates is expected to approve the $578,000 test venture Wednesday. "Not having a trash can is actually a very big factor in rat infestation," said Valentina Ukwuoma, head of the Bureau of Solid Waste.
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