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NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder/Tribune | December 9, 2001
This is the time of year when we think back to the very first Christmas, when the Three Wise Men - Gaspar, Balthasar and Herb - went to see the baby Jesus, and, according to the Book of Matthew, "presented unto Him gifts; gold, frankincense and myrrh." These are simple words, but if we analyze them carefully, we discover an important, yet often-overlooked, theological fact: There is no mention of wrapping paper. If there had been wrapping paper, Matthew would have said so: "And lo, the gifts were inside 600 square cubits of paper.
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NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | January 17, 2001
Police officers sifting through trash bags set out for collection do not violate the Fourth Amendment protections against unreasonable search and seizure, the Maryland Court of Appeals ruled yesterday. In a 4--3 decision, the state's highest court reversed and remanded a Court of Special Appeals decision to reverse the drug-possession conviction of a Dorchester County woman after evidence found in her trash was used to prosecute her. The court ruled that people have no right to privacy in their trash once it has been set out to be picked up. "If the trash is placed for collection at a place that is readily accessible, and thus exposed to the public, the person has relinquished any reasonable expectation of privacy," Judge Alan M. Wilner wrote in the 14-page opinion.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | October 7, 2000
The trash bags went out at night within arm's reach of the sidewalk for routine trash collection in Cambridge on the Eastern Shore. The next morning, they were gone. But six times in 1997, police, rather than the trash collector, took them without a search warrant. In a long-established law enforcement practice commonly used in drug and espionage cases, the police sifted through the garbage, hunting for evidence of illegal drugs. They used the cocaine residue they found to get a search warrant for the house.
NEWS
September 10, 2000
Can't the county even find funds for trash bags? I recently received in the mail a newsletter from the Severna Park Middle School Parent Teacher Organization. It was full of information regarding the PTO's goals for the year, pleas for volunteers and a schedule of PTO meetings. However, one request left me somewhat befuddled. A highlighted area on one page stated, "believe it or not, the county no longer provides trash bags for the classrooms or offices. To prevent the custodial staff from wasting valuable time washing out every trashcan every night, please consider sending in a box of tall kitchen bags or larger.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | May 5, 2000
The dirty word in downtown Ellicott City is trash. Say it on Main Street and people will groan, grumble or sigh -- it's a subject with which merchants are all too familiar. There's tension because some business owners put out their trash bags long before the Department of Public Works is scheduled to pick them up. There are debates over where Main Street's cast-iron trash cans should sit and if there ought to be more of them. There are public reminders for merchants to sweep up litter in front of their shops.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | May 2, 1997
THE SPIRIT of voluntarism abounds this week in the frothy wake of the presidential summit in Philadelphia. So, in that spirit -- and in the interest of encouraging governmental support of private citizens who answer the call to community service -- I offer the story of brothers Bobby and Jim Sturgell, their sister Sharon and all others who volunteered for a day of roadside trash pickup in Anne Arundel County. It was a beautiful thing while it lasted.The Sturgell family owns Happy Harbor, a restaurant and tavern in Deale, south of Annapolis.
NEWS
By Dan Morse and Dan Morse,SUN STAFF | February 22, 1996
Of the 30 Howard County residents who spoke against a proposed $125 trash fee last night, no one was more candid about her own garbage than 70-year-old Fronda Port.Ms. Port told the County Council that because she recycled as much as possible she should not have to pay $125 while others don't do their share.Then Ms. Port described this week's waste stream at her Kings Contrivance home: one milk carton (collapsed), one orange juice carton (collapsed), several paper napkins and tissues, small miscellaneous items, "and a chicken bone."
NEWS
December 19, 1995
A man robbed the Odenton Food Max store Friday of several cartons of cigarettes, county police said.Cathryn Steele told police the man entered the store in the 1600 block of Annapolis Road shortly after 1 p.m., walked behind the ** counter and pulled two empty trash bags from his pocket.He threatened to kill Ms. Steele if she activated the holdup alarm and patted his pocket to imply that he had a weapon, police said. The man filled the trash bags with cigarettes, ordered Ms. Steele to lie on the floor, then ran away, police said.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Sun Staff Writer | November 3, 1994
A 41-year-old man has been charged with the July 24, 1993, fatal beating and stabbing of a woman found stuffed in trash bags in a Northwest Baltimore alley, police reported.James Jackson of the 2000 block of Westwood Ave. was charged Tuesday with first-degree murder and use of a deadly weapon with intent to injure in the death of Cheryl Teresa Haywood, 25, police said.Ms. Haywood, of the 2900 block of Oakley Ave., was found in the early morning by two children who had gone out to play in an alley behind the 4600 block of Park Heights Ave., according to police reports.
NEWS
By Consella A. Lee and Consella A. Lee,Sun Staff Writer | May 19, 1994
Though some merchants in the Cromwell Field Shopping Center say Baltimoreans are riding the light rail to pilfer their stores, Anne Arundel County county police say that's not quite ++ true."
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