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NEWS
February 13, 2014
Speaking of trash collection around town, what exactly are our sanitation crews doing on Mondays when they aren't collecting regular or single-stream recyclable trash in most parts of the city ( "Talking trash in Baltimore," Feb. 10)? The deal was supposed to be that those crews would clean up alleys and whatnot on Mondays. Based on my own and others' observations, however, I'm guessing that isn't happening to any noticeable degree. Sean Tully, Baltimore - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 13, 2014
Laurie Schwartz's recent letter cheering the Inner Harbor 2.0 Plan after the Star-Spangled Spectacular and the Orioles' victory in the division is a positive note of which Baltimore can be proud ( "Baltimore's winning streak," Sept. 18). Ms. Schwartz has done a marvelous job over the years bringing out the best in Baltimore as president of the Waterfront Partnership. Cloning her would be to our advantage, but her optimism about the Inner Harbor 2.0 Plan needs to be tempered with a concern for how to accomplish it successfully.
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NEWS
February 21, 2013
I'm sure prior city administrators have looked into the feasibility of privatizing our trash collection within Baltimore City, or have they? ("Putting on the red ink," Feb. 20.) This has been a very successful venture in Baltimore County for over 40 years. Think about the elimination of sanitation employees, their pensions, benefits, salaries, trash trucks as well as other equipment, mechanics and maintenance employees. The bulk trash collection as well as the landfill operations would still be ours - or could those functions be privatized also?
NEWS
September 2, 2014
On the same day The Baltimore Sun reported on the enormous size of Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown's campaign chest, my wife, the registered Democrat in the family, received a four-page color ad trashing Larry Hogan. Seventy-some days prior to the election, the Maryland Democratic Party has chosen to trash Mr. Brown's opponent instead of highlighting Mr. Brown's qualifications and achievements. I don't mind the negative ads but this was overkill, too early in the cycle and wrong. Mr. Brown, you have been in the governor's office for a long time.
NEWS
September 30, 2010
Did politicians exempt themselves from the litter laws the same way they exempted themselves from the "do not call" list? The primary election was weeks ago, yet countless signs for those who lost remain, many illegally placed on public land. It's time for these signs to come down. At what point do they officially become litter? The offending campaigns should be fined. Steve Raskin, Parkton
EXPLORE
January 12, 2012
The following letter was addressed to members of the Harford County Council. A copy was provided for publication. We attended Tuesday night's public hearing, and left before the meeting started. After reading about the passage of Bill 11-62 without County Councilman Dion Guthrie's amendment approved, we are very disappointed to say the least. We do not believe that a 500-foot buffer was too much to ask. We hope that the community in which you live is never faced with the possibility of a transfer station such as we might be faced with here in Joppa.
NEWS
February 18, 2013
Let me see if I understand this. Robber-baron Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, a Democrat, proposes new save-the-city trash removal fees which apparently are not currently covered by our already burdensome taxes ("Trash fee, job cuts urged," Feb. 12)? If so, were we getting city trash removal for free all these decades? Donald Holland, Baltimore
NEWS
November 20, 2012
We live in an era where tradition and loyalty have been blown off the table and have been supplanted by unadulterated greed. A perfect example is the University of Maryland jettisoning the ACC Conference and joining the Big Ten ("UM to leave ACC for Big Ten in '14," Nov. 20). To University of Maryland President Wallace Loh and Athletic Director Kevin Anderson: Thanks for trashing what was a wonderful relationship with the ACC for 60 years. Patrick R. Lynch, Nottingham
NEWS
February 17, 2014
I want to point out that litter is not only a problem in Baltimore City ( "Talking trash in Baltimore," Feb. 10). I live in Howard County, and I am appalled at the amount of trash that lines our roadways throughout the county. A lot of the trash is plastic waste and fast food containers which are very harmful to the environment in many ways. There appears to be a notable absence of anti-littering signs in our county. Also, I no longer see TV commercials on the subject. Unfortunately, every generation needs to be educated and reminded about how harmful litter is. Carol Lepeau, Woodstock - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
EXPLORE
May 26, 2011
Laurel city offices will be closed Monday, May 30 for Memorial Day. Trash and recycling usually picked up Monday will be collected Tuesday, May 31. Tuesday's collections will be Wednesday, June 1. There will be no scheduled special pickups Wednesday. Government offices in Prince George's, Howard and Anne Arundel counties will be closed Monday, May 30, and no trash or curbside recycling collections will be made. Trash and recycling collections will resume on the next regularly scheduled collection day.
NEWS
By Michael Hankin | June 3, 2014
A seemingly endless flow of trash has plagued the Inner Harbor for years, and the problem only gets worse in the aftermath of downpours like the one that washed through the area in early May. Baltimore's hardworking fleet of trash-skimming boats scoops 200 tons of garbage from the harbor every year, but it can barely keep up with the problem. But as 884,409 people (and counting) on the website Reddit can attest, help has arrived. That's how many people viewed a video featuring the city's latest solution.
NEWS
May 13, 2014
There are 26 outlets to the Baltimore Harbor, and most of these are from the neighborhoods that empty into it. The new trash interceptor is amazing ( "New water wheel joins fight against harbor trash," May 6) but it will clean up only the Jones Falls outlet. One cannot jump from having this interceptor to the conclusion expressed in a recent article that we will have a swimmable Baltimore Harbor in 2020. The trash problem is not a water problem but a land problem that is not getting the attention, and bold moves are necessary to solve this issue.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2014
With debris from last week's deluge still littering the Inner Harbor, a big new weapon is poised to take on the rafts of floating trash that routinely gross out Baltimore's waterfront visitors and residents alike. A "water wheel" designed to scoop up 50,000 pounds of flotsam every day debuts Thursday in the channel between Piers 5 and 6, where the Jones Falls empties into the Northwest Branch of the Patapsco River. Its backers hope it will make a serious dent in the torrent of garbage that's flushed into the harbor whenever it rains, besmirching the city's watery showcase.
NEWS
April 18, 2014
While I agree with Michael Hankin's sentiments about the many potential benefits of Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's new street sweeping initiative ( "A clean sweep in Baltimore," April 8) and applaud her efforts, there are more pieces to this puzzle. Having spent my days in a city neighborhood with my grandson for more than two years and attempting when I can to keep his block picked up, I have made several observations. First, the streets will never be free of litter until people who live or work in the city learn not to drop their trash - cigarette butts, fare cards, bottles, chip bags, candy wrappers, bakery hair nets, etc. - wherever it suits them.
NEWS
By Michael Hankin | April 7, 2014
Expanded street sweeping is a win-win for neighborhoods and the environment. Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake deserves a lot of credit for the recently announced expansion of Baltimore's street sweeping program ( City street-sweeping expansion to rely on cooperation, not enforcement , March 20). Beginning this week, 90 percent of streets in Baltimore will be visited by a street sweeper at least once a month. If you live on a street without a posted schedule, the city is asking you to voluntarily learn the schedule and move your vehicle accordingly.
NEWS
February 17, 2014
I want to point out that litter is not only a problem in Baltimore City ( "Talking trash in Baltimore," Feb. 10). I live in Howard County, and I am appalled at the amount of trash that lines our roadways throughout the county. A lot of the trash is plastic waste and fast food containers which are very harmful to the environment in many ways. There appears to be a notable absence of anti-littering signs in our county. Also, I no longer see TV commercials on the subject. Unfortunately, every generation needs to be educated and reminded about how harmful litter is. Carol Lepeau, Woodstock - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
NEWS
May 4, 2010
Is it any mystery why Maryland and Baltimore in particular, are considered anti-business? The "living wage" bill proposed by City Councilwoman Mary Pat Clarke will certainly result in the closing of one retailer on Pratt Street downtown and possibly threatens the existence of current and proposed Walmart stores, meaning the considerable loss of jobs ("'Major retailers' would pay city's 'living wage' under bill," May 4). How can politicians be so arrogant as to decide that they can tell an employer how much they have to pay employees?
EXPLORE
January 5, 2012
Editor: Next Tuesday, Jan. 10, at 7 p.m. at the Harford County Board of Education building at 102 S. Hickory Ave. in Bel Air, the public hearing for the Solid Waste Transfer Station Bill 11-62 will be held by the County Council. This is a bill to make the County government inform the people that a solid waste transfer station is coming to their neighborhood. It details what sort of trash it will take, where the trash will be taken, how large a facility it will be, and how many trucks will be cruising your neighborhood.
NEWS
By Tim Swift, The Baltimore Sun | February 16, 2014
A Harwood man was charged with assault Saturday after Anne Arundel County police said he got into a fight with another man over a piece of trash. Witnesses said the victim threw a cup from his car Friday night outside a bar in Edgewater. Police said Timothy Zois, 47, then told the victim to pick up his trash and a fight ensued. During the scuffle, police said Zois pushed the victim to the ground, which caused the man hit his head on the pavement. Witnesses called police around 10:30 p.m. saying the man was bleeding and had lost consciousness.
NEWS
February 13, 2014
Speaking of trash collection around town, what exactly are our sanitation crews doing on Mondays when they aren't collecting regular or single-stream recyclable trash in most parts of the city ( "Talking trash in Baltimore," Feb. 10)? The deal was supposed to be that those crews would clean up alleys and whatnot on Mondays. Based on my own and others' observations, however, I'm guessing that isn't happening to any noticeable degree. Sean Tully, Baltimore - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
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