Advertisement
HomeCollectionsTrapeze
IN THE NEWS

Trapeze

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | May 13, 2004
On the verge of approving a trapeze school at the Inner Harbor, city officials decided yesterday to take a closer look before making the leap. The Board of Estimates was expected to approve a deal to allow the Trapeze School New York to offer lessons on Rash Field until November in exchange for $2,000 a month in rent. The item was listed on the "routine" portion of the agenda, meaning that it was expected to pass without discussion. But City Council President Sheila Dixon, chairwoman of the board, said she was not aware of the plan until an article about it appeared in yesterday's Sun. She questioned whether the city might be held liable in case of an accident.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,john-john.williams@baltsun.com | June 1, 2009
Sue Pankow looked like a pro Sunday afternoon as she grabbed the thin metal bar and shot through the air. With the Inner Harbor skyline as a backdrop, she reached out and grabbed the waiting arms of her trapeze instructor. After a huge swing, pointed toes kicking out into the cloudy sky, she released and fell to the safety net below. "I'm psyched!" the 44-year-old mother of two yelled as she bounced up and down on the net. "I don't believe I did that." But Sunday was bittersweet for the Trapeze School NY. The school, which has operated in Baltimore from April to November since 2004, is moving to Washington, where it can open year-round in a more affordable location, according to employees.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,jonathan.pitts@baltsun.com | November 9, 2008
When the upscale restaurant Trapeze opened in Fulton in 2005, critics hailed it as a "playful and sophisticated retreat," a place whose "soaring space" and flavorful fare could turn a quick detour off U.S. 29 into a memorable dining experience. After three years, the retreat is no more. The first business to open in the Maple Lawn development in southern Howard County, Trapeze has shut its doors, an apparent victim of the recent economic downturn across the nation and the world. "We deeply regret that [the]
NEWS
May 29, 2009
Anne Arundel approves $2.4 billion budget The Anne Arundel County Council unanimously approved Thursday a combined $2.4 billion operating and capital budget for the next fiscal year, which includes a property tax rate cut and no employee layoffs or furloughs but leaves the public schools scrambling to make up a $45 million deficit. County Executive John R. Leopold had proposed a $1.17 billion operating budget, with across-the-board, 9 percent departmental cuts. But the council passed an operating budget that is $12.3 million more than Leopold proposed, largely subsidizing it with cuts to the capital budget and the use of bonds instead of on-hand cash for construction projects.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | July 25, 2004
Four women soared through an overcast sky yesterday during the inaugural class of the trapeze school at the Inner Harbor, experiencing thrills once available only to circus acrobats or those visiting exclusive resorts. Columbia physical therapist Susan Davis, 36, said her heart had been pounding since she got in the car to drive to the class. "I'm a little nervous," she said as instructor Scout Day hooked her guide lines on. "Are you sure I'm ready for this?" However, on her first try, Davis wrapped her legs around the trapeze bar, released her hands and safely reached Brian McVicker's outstretched arms.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | September 10, 2006
Food: ** 1/2 (2 1/2 stars) Service: *** (3 stars) Atmosphere: ** 1/2 (2 1/2 stars) On a hot evening toward the end of summer, the mostly vacant office and retail complex at Maple Lawn had a post-apocalyptic feel. The streets, like the storefronts, were brightly lit but empty. A warm breeze swirled a couple of dried leaves on the otherwise-spotless sidewalk. It was good to know that a few survivors were making merry in Trapeze, a restaurant brought to you by the same folks who manage Bluestone in Timonium and Nottingham in Columbia.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | May 12, 2004
You don't have to run away to join the circus anymore. A New York trapeze school that has been turning tourists and the occasional Sex in the City star into high fliers wants to persuade Baltimoreans to hurl themselves off 23-foot platforms at the Inner Harbor. City officials are expected to sign off on a deal today that would allow Trapeze School New York, operating under the name TSNY Baltimore, to give lessons at Rash Field until November. Along with rent of $2,000 a month, the city would get an attraction not often found outside of summer camps and Club Med-style resorts.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,john-john.williams@baltsun.com | June 1, 2009
Sue Pankow looked like a pro Sunday afternoon as she grabbed the thin metal bar and shot through the air. With the Inner Harbor skyline as a backdrop, she reached out and grabbed the waiting arms of her trapeze instructor. After a huge swing, pointed toes kicking out into the cloudy sky, she released and fell to the safety net below. "I'm psyched!" the 44-year-old mother of two yelled as she bounced up and down on the net. "I don't believe I did that." But Sunday was bittersweet for the Trapeze School NY. The school, which has operated in Baltimore from April to November since 2004, is moving to Washington, where it can open year-round in a more affordable location, according to employees.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,SUN STAFF | May 26, 2005
The most terrifying part of swinging on a flying trapeze is the 30 seconds or so before you jump off the ledge. You stand on a platform suspended 23 feet in the air. Your toes hang over the edge. You reach for the trapeze with one hand and find the bar to be surprisingly heavy. You extend the other arm out to grasp the bar with two hands. An instructor holds your waist so you don't fly off the platform prematurely. You are told: "Jump!" You think crazy thoughts, none of which are publishable.
FEATURES
By DEBORAH BACH and DEBORAH BACH,CONTRIBUTING WRITERS | May 29, 2000
Jen Pastor just wouldn't learn. She swung from the top of her canopy bed, from bathroom towel bars that came crashing down, from monkey bars she fell from, leaving a small round scar on her forehead. "I hurt myself pretty bad," Pastor says, laughing. Undeterred, Pastor wanted to join the circus but instead went to college to study psychology. But tonight, the 21-year-old is back on the bar, this time with some professional guidance. At Gerstung Inter-Sport school in Mount Washington, Pastor swings on a trapeze, smiling contentedly.
NEWS
By chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | January 31, 2009
No Hollywood star has ever exuded more self-confidence onscreen than Burt Lancaster - or seemed to enjoy being in front of the camera more. Tall and athletic, with a killer smile and a staccato speaking style that became fodder for impressionists the world over, Lancaster was every inch the star. All that, and he was a pretty good actor, too, especially when the role either allowed his passion to emerge full-throttle or demanded that he keep it firmly under control. Tonight's TCM schedule offers four chances to see Lancaster at his best.
NEWS
November 9, 2008
Honoring the past: In Annapolis, they know a thing or two about history. Now the city's mayor, Ellen O. Moyer, is about to become the only municipal official on a 10-member panel charged with recommending improvements to the structure of federal historic preservation programs. Salute: Veterans Day is Tuesday, and at the U.S.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,jonathan.pitts@baltsun.com | November 9, 2008
When the upscale restaurant Trapeze opened in Fulton in 2005, critics hailed it as a "playful and sophisticated retreat," a place whose "soaring space" and flavorful fare could turn a quick detour off U.S. 29 into a memorable dining experience. After three years, the retreat is no more. The first business to open in the Maple Lawn development in southern Howard County - a bit west of the Anne Arundel County line - Trapeze has shut its doors, an apparent victim of the recent economic downturn across the nation and the globe.
NEWS
By JANET GILBERT | August 12, 2007
Water-skiing always looked like such fun when the Doublemint twins did it. Up they popped out of the water in their matching swimsuits, holding the tow-rope with one hand and waving energetically at the crowd with the other. The whole scene looked exhilarating and fresh - precisely the adjectives Wrigley's marketing team hoped would come to customers' minds when chewing Doublemint gum: "Why, chewing this gum is experientially identical to water-skiing!" My recent family vacation offered water-skiing along with other extreme recreational activities, including swinging on a circus trapeze.
NEWS
January 14, 2007
When the city plows under Rash Field for a below-ground parking garage, there should rise in its place a realm of childish wonder, of curious delight and aesthetic intrigue. The city wants to retain some form of recreation on the site, but it should avoid the predictable. Think outdoor glockenspiel, a swimmable fountain, a garden labyrinth. Think unconventional. Rash Field has always been a park in transition. Sandwiched between the Maryland Science Center and the Rusty Scupper at the Inner Harbor, it has housed a skating rink, beach volleyball courts and an outdoor trapeze school.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | September 10, 2006
Food: ** 1/2 (2 1/2 stars) Service: *** (3 stars) Atmosphere: ** 1/2 (2 1/2 stars) On a hot evening toward the end of summer, the mostly vacant office and retail complex at Maple Lawn had a post-apocalyptic feel. The streets, like the storefronts, were brightly lit but empty. A warm breeze swirled a couple of dried leaves on the otherwise-spotless sidewalk. It was good to know that a few survivors were making merry in Trapeze, a restaurant brought to you by the same folks who manage Bluestone in Timonium and Nottingham in Columbia.
NEWS
By Rachel Gottlieb and Rachel Gottlieb,HARTFORD COURANT | October 14, 1999
HARTFORD, Conn. -- Rochelle Friedlich climbs 24 feet to the trapeze platform. She reaches for the bar with one hand. Takes flight. Grabs hold of the bar with her other hand. Then she soars.On this, her first day flying on the trapeze, the 39-year-old Manhattan attorney is flexing beyond a swing. She means to execute her first trick: flying into the arms of a catcher who is hanging upside down and swinging.Friedlich hoists her legs over the bar, lets go with her hands and drops backward, leaving her legs curled around the bar.The moment comes.
NEWS
By JULIE SCHARPER and JULIE SCHARPER,SUN REPORTER | June 15, 2006
Inner Harbor's Rash Field, once home to an ice skating rink and now a playground for barefoot beach volleyball players and soaring trapeze students, might soon be transformed again - with a parking garage beneath it. The preliminary plan, which might endanger the two attractions, is to be presented to Mayor Martin O'Malley and community and business leaders this month. It would involve elevating the field enough to build a one- or two-level parking structure underneath, holding 400 to 500 cars.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.