Advertisement
HomeCollectionsTransportation Trust
IN THE NEWS

Transportation Trust

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Staff writer | April 3, 1991
County Executive Charles I. Ecker's proposed capital budget containsonly $8.76 million of the $10 million requested to help the state build two major highway projects -- an intersection at U.S. 29 and St. John's Lane that is part of the Route 100 project, and relocation of Route 32 from Cedar Lane to Route 108 in Clarksville.Whatever money the county contributes, the projects will hinge on about $50 million in contributions from a depleted state transportation fund that the General Assembly has so far failed to revive.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 15, 2014
A proposed state constitutional amendment creating a firewall for the Transportation Trust Fund will be on the ballot this fall, and while the legislation is flawed, it deserves voter support. The legislation (Senate Bill 829 of 2013) received bipartisan support in both the House and Senate. The proposed amendment provides that transportation revenue can be transferred to the general fund only if the governor by executive order declares a fiscal emergency and the General Assembly by a three-fifths vote concurs.
Advertisement
NEWS
February 8, 2009
Safeguard the trust before a gas tax hike Jay Hancock's recommendation that we increase the state's gas tax by a dime underscores the importance of creating a constitutional firewall to protect the transportation trust fund ("Maryland could lead the way by raising its gas tax," Feb 4). There is no denying the need Mr. Hancock cites to build a "21st-century transportation system." But more than $1 billion has been transferred from the fund over the past two decades into the general fund to help balance the state budget.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | February 4, 2013
For the fifth year in a row, Del. Eric M. Bromwell has introduced a bill to authorize slot machines at BWI Marshall Airport It's Bromwell's attempt to infuse the state treasury — specifically the Transportation Trust Fund — with gambling money, and the Baltimore County Democrat said he has no intention of giving up. "I consider this to be the ultimate alternative to a gas tax," he said. "This is exactly how we pay for roads. " The bill would authorize up to 2,500 slot machines in the airport's main terminal beyond the security screening area.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Evening Sun Staff | December 19, 1990
O. James Lighthizer, Maryland's newly appointed transportation secretary, supports raising up to $1.5 billion in transportation revenues through new taxes and fees during the next five years.Lighthizer, tapped by the governor for the post this month, said a $1 billion or $1.5 billion revenue increase would be a "realistic" way to make up for a projected revenue shortfall and to pay for maintenance and other essential transportation needs.Because of the current economic downturn and unrest in the Middle East, state officials project a $521 million shortfall in transportation revenues over the next five years.
NEWS
June 15, 1999
FOR FIVE YEARS, Gov. Parris N. Glendening has avoided raising transportation taxes. The General Assembly has happily gone along: Politicians never want to be labeled tax-raisers.But the state's transportation trust fund, which pays for road, bridge, mass transit, airport and port improvements, is running low. There isn't enough cash to pay for new light-rail routes or to complete widening of the Baltimore beltway. Nor is there money to replace the Woodrow Wilson Bridge or build an east-west Intercounty Connector in the Washington area.
NEWS
November 21, 1994
It was one of the great unspoken issues of this year's campaign for governor: Maryland's transportation program is steadily going broke, but neither candidate wanted to say so directly.The problem is that Maryland is a small state trying to pay for two major metropolitan transit systems. With federal support for mass transit shrinking under domestic spending constraints, Maryland is left paying an ever-bigger share of capital and operating expenses for bus and subway lines in the Baltimore and Washington areas.
NEWS
By Doug Birch and Doug Birch,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 4, 1990
WASHINGTON -- Secretary of Transportation Samuel K. Skinner, long a critic of proposals to reduce the budget deficit with higher federal gasoline taxes, saw the light yesterday.Echoing President Bush's support for the $500 billion deficit-reduction agreement with congressional leadership, Mr. Skinner told reporters that the package, which includes a 12-cents-a-gallon gasoline tax increase, "made some sense."That figure includes increases totaling a dime a gallon at the pump by July 1, 1991, and a 2-cents-a-gallon tax levied beginning Jan. 1 at the refinery -- the cost of which is likely to be passed on to consumers as well.
NEWS
By Phillip McGowan and Phillip McGowan,SUN REPORTER | October 17, 2007
No state funding is available to build road, bus and parking projects around Fort Meade to support the influx of thousands of new workers, the state's transportation secretary told Anne Arundel County officials and lawmakers this week. As the state pushes ahead with widening a 1 1/2 -mile stretch of Baltimore-Washington Parkway near BWI-Marshall Airport and replacing a bridge near National Business Park at the Anne Arundel-Howard County line, there is little money in the six-year capital budget to do anything else but preserve infrastructure in Anne Arundel or statewide.
NEWS
August 7, 1994
Maryland's candidates for governor don't talk about it too loudly, but there's a tax increase on the horizon, regardless of who wins in November. Campaign rhetoric about "no new taxes" will give way next January to the reality of a transportation trust fund quickly running out of money.When confronted on this issue, the candidates hem and haw, dancing around the key question: How should we pay for this state's future road-building and mass-transit needs?Here, for instance, is what Republican Helen Bentley told the Greater Baltimore Committee back in June.
NEWS
April 13, 2012
The Sun ("A silver lining," April 12) and Sen. Jim Rosapepe ("Put transportation to voters," April 12) turn a blind eye to the truth about the true cause of shortfalls in the state's Transportation Trust Fund. Marylanders do not believe their false claims that a higher sales tax or gas tax will reduce traffic congestion. Traffic congestion is caused by too many cars and too little traffic flow, either from accidents or lane closures. The Sun would have you believe that the poor do not have cars and that the middle class, a group that seems to be everyday growing in definition, can absorb any tax dreamed by this administration.
NEWS
February 3, 2012
Gov.Martin O'Malley's proposed 6 percent sales tax in addition to the state's current 23.5-cent tax per gallon will make it harder for me to balance my budget. For the past 10 years I have averaged 16,144 miles a year, and I try to budget my expenses for each year since I am real estate agent and I drive a lot. I like driving buyers around to see as many houses as they like until they find the one they want. If the tax was just a flat increase of 15 cents per gallon, my cost of gas would increase by only $121 per year.
EXPLORE
December 14, 2011
State legislature must put trust back in Transportation Trust Fund Governor Martin O'Malley's Blue Ribbon Commission on Transportation Funding has recommended significantly increasing the gasoline tax and doubling vehicle registration and inspection fees - an impact of more than $900 million per year. While I agree we need to improve our congested and deteriorating roads, I strongly disagree that raising the gas tax should be the first order of business. Passing a constitutional amendment to put the "trust" back in the Transportation Trust Fund should be the first item on the legislature's agenda when the General Assembly convenes in January.
NEWS
February 15, 2011
AAA Mid-Atlantic applauds The Baltimore Sun in recognizing the importance of adequately funding and protecting Maryland's Transportation Trust Fund (TTF) from raids by budget-balancing governors ( "Transportation fire wall" Feb. 10). However, we are concerned that The Sun is suggesting that something less than permanent protection for the fund would suffice. This year Gov. Martin O'Malley is yet again proposing to raid the fund to help balance Maryland's budget. While we understand the tremendous fiscal challenges facing our elected officials, we can not comprehend how in good faith Maryland citizens can be expected to pay more taxes and fees to support the TTF only to have those dollars then spent on non-transportation items.
NEWS
February 8, 2009
Safeguard the trust before a gas tax hike Jay Hancock's recommendation that we increase the state's gas tax by a dime underscores the importance of creating a constitutional firewall to protect the transportation trust fund ("Maryland could lead the way by raising its gas tax," Feb 4). There is no denying the need Mr. Hancock cites to build a "21st-century transportation system." But more than $1 billion has been transferred from the fund over the past two decades into the general fund to help balance the state budget.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | February 4, 2009
There is never a good time to raise taxes. But the stars of politics, markets, immediate requirements and long-term need are aligned as they have rarely been before to permit a modest increase in Maryland's gasoline tax. An extra dime per gallon would make Maryland's gas tax only a penny more than Pennsylvania's, generate more than $300 million in badly needed annual revenue and give Maryland training wheels for the lower-carbon, made-in-the-USA energy...
NEWS
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,Sun Staff Correspondent | November 13, 1991
COLLEGE PARK -- Parent, alumni, faculty and student groups claiming tens of thousands of members around the state pledged yesterday to campaign for a bill to restore deep budget cuts to the University of Maryland at College Park and to other public university campuses.For their logo, they chose the Terrapin mascot stripped of its shell. And for one of their first organized lobbying efforts, students hired a funeral hearse to lead a procession to Annapolis tomorrow.One bill to restore cuts, an emergency measure to be pre-filed this week in the General Assembly, would permanently redirect to higher education $70 million annually in corporate income taxes now dedicated to transportation.
NEWS
September 14, 2008
The financing of highways, mass transit and other transportation improvements faced two major roadblocks last week. One was temporarily averted; the other was not. Congress and the White House agreed on an $8 billion reprieve for the nearly bankrupt federal highway trust fund. The infusion of general fund money will keep the trust fund limping along well into next year, but it's no permanent fix. State transportation programs didn't fare as well. In Maryland, declining tax revenue means more than $1 billion less will be spent on roads and public transportation over the next six years.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.