Advertisement
HomeCollectionsTransportation Safety
IN THE NEWS

Transportation Safety

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By MICHAEL DRESSER | February 9, 2009
Every year, lawmakers come to Annapolis brimming with ideas to make our roads just a little bit safer. Some of them are sound and logical. Some of them are well-intentioned but harebrained schemes. Most of them get a few minutes in the spotlight and then never see the light of day. Last week, a House of Delegates committee held hearings on a few of the less-publicized bills intended to promote transportation safety. Some of them had a great deal of merit and could make it into law. Others are sound proposals that are destined to be snuffed out in a late-night committee vote.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 5, 2012
With the announcement by Comptroller Peter Franchot last week that the state of Maryland has a $500 million surplus ("State budget surplus greater than expected," Sept. 1), AAA Mid-Atlantic is calling upon Gov. Martin O'Malley and Comptroller Franchot to work together on a plan to dedicate those funds to transportation and return them to the state's Transportation Trust Fund, which is used to fund Maryland's roads and mass transit projects. We have a terrible transportation funding crisis in the state that is so bad that the governor and the legislature impaneled a Blue Ribbon Commission on Transportation Funding to spend over a year examining the issues and make recommendations, which it did in its final report of November, 2011.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | November 25, 1997
BY NOW, you've heard that sabotage did not bring down TWA Flight 800.The FBI's basis for that conclusion included a detailed computer simulation that illuminated as never before what happened that July night in 1996. Now it's time to recall the urgent recommendations for safety changes put forth by the crash investigators almost a year ago, and the slow response by the Federal Aviation Administration.The National Transportation Safety Board developed a theory that an explosive air-fuel mix in the Boeing 747-131's largely empty central wing tank had ignited, though the cause of a precipitating spark is still unknown.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,michael.dresser@baltsun.com | March 6, 2009
Five years after the water taxi Lady D flipped over in Baltimore Harbor, killing five passengers, two federal agencies remain divided over the cause of the tragedy and the lessons to be learned from it. The National Transportation Safety Board, after its investigation, made recommendations to the Coast Guard on steps to be taken to prevent future small-craft accidents. But the Coast Guard has staked out a contrary position on several points as it struggles to rewrite its safety rules in the aftermath of a calamity that shook the maritime agency to its core.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,SUN STAFF | June 26, 1996
When hearings begin today on last February's train crash near Silver Spring, federal investigators will not only focus on the cause of the accident that claimed 11 lives.They also want to know why some passengers could not escape the burning cars, and why U.S. transportation officials have been slow to adopt new safety standards for commuter trains."We will be asking probing questions about commuter rail safety issues that affect Washington-area commuters and millions of other Americans who use the rails to get to work and back home every day," said Jim Hall, chairman of the National Transportation Safety Board.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | January 15, 2004
A single chunk of metal with a number stamped into it. A car door dented in the shape of a tractor-trailer's massive tire. A few ounces of human blood. These fragments survived the 2,000-degree gasoline fire after Tuesday's deadly tanker accident on Interstate 95. To the untrained eye, the relics of four people's deaths seem tragically sparse and meaningless. But to accident experts, they unlock a treasure chest of other information: driver's licenses and medical charts, cargo manifests and repair records, logbooks and even credit-card receipts.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | August 17, 2001
Finding out what caused last month's train derailment and fire in the CSX tunnel beneath the heart of Baltimore may turn out to be one of the most difficult challenges ever faced by the National Transportation Safety Board, experts say. The five-day fire and the process of fighting it destroyed or altered evidence investigators typically rely on to determine the causes and consequences of rail accidents. One investigator characterized the wreck July 18 of the 60-car, chemical-bearing CSX train in the Howard Street tunnel as a "Murphy's Law" sort of accident and aftermath, where anything that could go wrong did. Rail cars were moved from their crash positions, new debris was carried onto the site, and the fire consumed cargo and affected the track and tunnel in ways that tainted the scene for investigators.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | August 17, 2001
Finding out just what caused last month's train derailment and fire in the CSX tunnel beneath the heart of Baltimore may turn out to be one of the most difficult challenges ever faced by the National Transportation Safety Board, experts say. The five-day fire and the process of fighting it destroyed or altered evidence investigators typically rely on to determine the causes and consequences of rail accidents. One investigator characterized the July 18 wreck of the 60-car, chemical-bearing CSX train in the Howard Street tunnel as a "Murphy's Law" sort of accident and aftermath, where anything that could go wrong did. Rail cars were moved from their crash positions, new debris was carried onto the site, and the fire consumed cargo and affected the track and tunnel in ways that tainted the scene for investigators.
NEWS
September 5, 2012
With the announcement by Comptroller Peter Franchot last week that the state of Maryland has a $500 million surplus ("State budget surplus greater than expected," Sept. 1), AAA Mid-Atlantic is calling upon Gov. Martin O'Malley and Comptroller Franchot to work together on a plan to dedicate those funds to transportation and return them to the state's Transportation Trust Fund, which is used to fund Maryland's roads and mass transit projects. We have a terrible transportation funding crisis in the state that is so bad that the governor and the legislature impaneled a Blue Ribbon Commission on Transportation Funding to spend over a year examining the issues and make recommendations, which it did in its final report of November, 2011.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | November 2, 1998
Minutes past 7 p.m. on Oct. 13, Alan Pollock, a 12-year National Transportation Safety Board employee, was at home watching television when a news bulletin reported an explosion at Condea Vista's South Baltimore chemical plant.The accident, which sent five workers and three residents to local hospitals, did not involve a plane or a train, but Pollock called his office anyway. He wanted the NTSB to report the incident to an obscure federal agency: the U.S. Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board.
NEWS
By MICHAEL DRESSER | February 9, 2009
Every year, lawmakers come to Annapolis brimming with ideas to make our roads just a little bit safer. Some of them are sound and logical. Some of them are well-intentioned but harebrained schemes. Most of them get a few minutes in the spotlight and then never see the light of day. Last week, a House of Delegates committee held hearings on a few of the less-publicized bills intended to promote transportation safety. Some of them had a great deal of merit and could make it into law. Others are sound proposals that are destined to be snuffed out in a late-night committee vote.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | January 15, 2004
A single chunk of metal with a number stamped into it. A car door dented in the shape of a tractor-trailer's massive tire. A few ounces of human blood. These fragments survived the 2,000-degree gasoline fire after Tuesday's deadly tanker accident on Interstate 95. To the untrained eye, the relics of four people's deaths seem tragically sparse and meaningless. But to accident experts, they unlock a treasure chest of other information: driver's licenses and medical charts, cargo manifests and repair records, logbooks and even credit-card receipts.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | March 31, 2003
Members of the Columbia Association council have been working almost nonstop in recent months on the question of where their organization should focus its energies in coming years. Now they have some answers from Columbia residents. Columbians want the giant homeowners' association to do more to help older adults, streamline its governance systems and improve public safety within Howard County, according to a survey conducted this month as part of the association's strategic planning process.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | August 17, 2001
Finding out just what caused last month's train derailment and fire in the CSX tunnel beneath the heart of Baltimore may turn out to be one of the most difficult challenges ever faced by the National Transportation Safety Board, experts say. The five-day fire and the process of fighting it destroyed or altered evidence investigators typically rely on to determine the causes and consequences of rail accidents. One investigator characterized the July 18 wreck of the 60-car, chemical-bearing CSX train in the Howard Street tunnel as a "Murphy's Law" sort of accident and aftermath, where anything that could go wrong did. Rail cars were moved from their crash positions, new debris was carried onto the site, and the fire consumed cargo and affected the track and tunnel in ways that tainted the scene for investigators.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | August 17, 2001
Finding out what caused last month's train derailment and fire in the CSX tunnel beneath the heart of Baltimore may turn out to be one of the most difficult challenges ever faced by the National Transportation Safety Board, experts say. The five-day fire and the process of fighting it destroyed or altered evidence investigators typically rely on to determine the causes and consequences of rail accidents. One investigator characterized the wreck July 18 of the 60-car, chemical-bearing CSX train in the Howard Street tunnel as a "Murphy's Law" sort of accident and aftermath, where anything that could go wrong did. Rail cars were moved from their crash positions, new debris was carried onto the site, and the fire consumed cargo and affected the track and tunnel in ways that tainted the scene for investigators.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN STAFF | July 29, 2001
Fires raged, chemicals leaked, smoke climbed to the sky and the possibility of an explosion was a constant worry. And amid it all, in the middle of a century-old tunnel where temperatures were approaching 1,500 degrees, an investigation had to begin. It started with a call to the National Transportation Safety Board in Washington about 5 p.m. July 18. Officials there must quickly try to assess the seriousness of an accident and whether it's likely to become a high-profile event. When they heard a 60-car freight train loaded with hazardous chemicals derailed beneath Baltimore, NTSB officials knew they'd be counted on to determine how it happened.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN STAFF | July 29, 2001
Fires raged, chemicals leaked, smoke climbed to the sky and the possibility of an explosion was a constant worry. And amid it all, in the middle of a century-old tunnel where temperatures were approaching 1,500 degrees, an investigation had to begin. It started with a call to the National Transportation Safety Board in Washington about 5 p.m. July 18. Officials there must quickly try to assess the seriousness of an accident and whether it's likely to become a high-profile event. When they heard a 60-car freight train loaded with hazardous chemicals derailed beneath Baltimore, NTSB officials knew they'd be counted on to determine how it happened.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | November 2, 1999
Transportation and safety are important issues for Columbia's senior citizens, according to participants at an open forum yesterday sponsored by the Columbia Association's Senior Advisory Committee.The committee is concluding a survey of the needs of residents over age 60 and held the meeting to give seniors who had not been surveyed the opportunity to voice their opinions. Nineteen seniors, committee members and others came to the East Columbia Senior Center to discuss the survey's topics, including job and volunteer opportunities, social and cultural activities, physical fitness, housing and medical services.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | November 2, 1999
Transportation and safety are important issues for Columbia's senior citizens, according to participants at an open forum yesterday sponsored by the Columbia Association's Senior Advisory Committee.The committee is concluding a survey of the needs of residents over age 60 and held the meeting to give seniors who had not been surveyed the opportunity to voice their opinions. Nineteen seniors, committee members and others came to the East Columbia Senior Center to discuss the survey's topics, including job and volunteer opportunities, social and cultural activities, physical fitness, housing and medical services.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | November 2, 1998
Minutes past 7 p.m. on Oct. 13, Alan Pollock, a 12-year National Transportation Safety Board employee, was at home watching television when a news bulletin reported an explosion at Condea Vista's South Baltimore chemical plant.The accident, which sent five workers and three residents to local hospitals, did not involve a plane or a train, but Pollock called his office anyway. He wanted the NTSB to report the incident to an obscure federal agency: the U.S. Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.