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NEWS
April 19, 2012
State Sen. Jim Rosapepe should be applauded for his statement on transportation funding ("Put transportation in voters' hands," April 11). Identifying funding streams for transportation investments is a national political debate. Many understand the extraordinary need to invest in rebuilding our transportation infrastructure, but no one has taken the initiative to Senator Rosapepe's level. It will take a great amount of political courage to achieve his vision. Three thoughts came to mind in response to his column.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2014
The Maryland Department of Transportation announced $280 million in new projects in its annual budget proposal released Tuesday, far less than the billions in capital improvements announced after the increase in the state's gas tax last year. The state's latest "consolidated transportation program," which covers transportation spending from 2015 to 2020, instead pushes along various projects announced last year, including about $1.5 billion worth in the Baltimore region. The draft budget will be taken up by the General Assembly in the coming legislative session.
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NEWS
April 27, 2012
Former Gov. Parris N. Glendening's proposal to let voters decide whether to build transportation projects ignores the long history of disconnect between the state's plans and outcomes, which cannot be resolved by a simple yes or no by voters ("Voters will support transportation projects," April 22). This goes back at least as far as the 1960s, when voters rejected a second parallel span for the Bay Bridge - and the state built it anyway. In the 1990s, even Gov. William Donald Schaefer got conned by his own Department of Transportation's promises regarding light rail.
NEWS
Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | November 5, 2013
A proposal to run a maglev train in the Northeast comes with a hefty price tag - approximately $10 billion just for the segment between Baltimore and Washington. Though the technology holds the promise of transporting passengers from one city to the next in 15 minutes, promoters will have to overcome the legacy of other promising projects that busted their budgets or turned out different than they looked on the drawing board. Big Dig By the early 1990s, traffic in Boston's Central Artery, an elevated six-lane highway that ran through the city's downtown, left traffic crawling for more than 10 hours a day. The Massachusetts Turnpike Authority started construction in 1991 to replace the Central Artery with an underground eight- to-10-lane expressway to combat the congestion.
NEWS
By Bobby McMahon and Capital News Service | December 13, 2009
Facing a massive shortfall in funding and looming gridlock, Gov. Martin O'Malley voiced strong support Friday for more federal dollars toward Base Realignment and Closure transportation projects in the state. At a news conference announcing that a highway project near Aberdeen Proving Ground was moving toward construction, O'Malley was confident that the shortfall in funding would be met. He emphasized that the state would work closely with Congress to make it happen. "We plan to meet the shortfall as we have every challenge in the history of our nation - by doing it together," O'Malley said.
NEWS
July 10, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley's announcement of $650 million for transportation projects in the Washington suburbs is welcome news for some Marylanders, but it also highlights serious concerns about how new gas tax money is allocated ("O'Malley announces nearly $650M for county transportation improvements," July 9). Every major state transportation project since the mid-1990s has gone to the Washington region. Just the four largest projects in that period - the Inter-County Connector, the Woodrow Wilson Bridge and completion of the Metro system's Blue and Green lines - total over $5 billion.
NEWS
November 30, 2003
Annapolis-area residents can learn more about local transportation projects at a presentation and panel discussion Thursday morning at City Hall. The event, "Managing the Impact: Annapolis Transportation Projects," will be held from 7:30 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. in the Annapolis city council chambers. It is being put on by the Annapolis Regional Transportation Management Association, a nonprofit group that advocates improving transportation. Representatives of the Maryland State Highway Administration will discuss plans to replace the Weems Creek bridge and rehabilitate the College Creek bridge, starting early next year.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,michael.dresser@baltsun.com | January 23, 2009
Maryland transportation projects, already scheduled to absorb $1.1 billion in cuts over the next six years, will lose an added $1 billion because of slumping revenues, state officials said yesterday. The Maryland Department of Transportation delivered the bad news in the final version of its 2009-2014 capital spending plan. The cuts are even steeper than those projected in a draft last fall. State officials now predict a $350 million-per-year drop in money going to the Transportation Trust Fund.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Laura Smitherman and Gadi Dechter and Laura Smitherman,gadi.dechter@baltsun.com and laura.smitherman@baltsun.com | February 18, 2009
Gov. Martin O'Malley is expected to unveil a plan today that would quickly spend more than $350 million in federal money on Maryland transportation projects, a day after President Barack Obama signed a huge stimulus bill that will send a flood of money to the states. In an announcement expected this morning, the Democratic governor will ask a state spending panel to approve the overhaul of a Laurel MARC station as a symbolic start to using the $3.8 billion windfall that is part of Maryland's estimated share of $787 billion in federal stimulus funds.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Michael Dresser and Laura Smitherman and Michael Dresser,laura.smitherman@baltsun.com | December 3, 2008
Philadelphia - The nation's governors met with President-elect Barack Obama yesterday to help craft an economic stimulus plan that would include money for ready-to-go transportation projects and programs for the poor stretched thin by increased demand. Several dozen governors gathered here for the pre-inaugural summit as the country has officially fallen into recession, and as many state budgets have seen widening deficits brought on by sluggish tax receipts. The conversation also veered from funding for alternative energy and updating the country's power infrastructure to investing in a high-speed rail system and health care technology, participants said.
NEWS
By Scot T. Spencer | September 18, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley's announcement this month of an investment of $1.5 billion into the state's transportation program came close on the heels of President Barack Obama's recent commitment to grow national manufacturing. Both of these efforts represent an incredible opportunity to spur an industry with real potential and bring jobs back to our shores. The Red and Purple rail lines in Baltimore and suburban Washington that Maryland plans to build are just two of many projects across the country aimed at expanding and modernizing existing public transportation systems to meet increased demand from commuters and residents.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector and Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley plans to announce $1.5 billion in new state funding for the Baltimore Red Line and more than a dozen other transportation projects in the area Wednesday, officials said, outlining for the first time how the state's gas tax increase will be tapped to improve local infrastructure and mass transit here. O'Malley also plans to discuss the state's interest in attracting public-private partnerships to help fund the Red Line project, and a Dec. 7 start date for weekend MARC train service between Baltimore and Washington, which has never been offered before.
FEATURES
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2013
The proposed Purple Line, which is to connect Metro stations in Prince George's and Montgomery counties, will be the first state transit line built and operated by a private company, Gov. Martin O'Malley announced on Monday. The state will seek a private firm to design, build and operate the 16-mile light rail line and its 21 new stations. The state would set the fares. All but $400 million of the project's $2.2 billion cost will be paid for by federal grants and private investment, according to O'Malley's office.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley and Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown will travel to Montgomery County Monday to roll out a list of new transportation projects as part of a campaign to show the gas tax increase they backed this year is being put to good use. The event, which follows a similar announcement in Prince George's County, will include news about the Washington region's biggest project -- the light rail Purple Line between New Carrollton and Bethesda, according...
NEWS
July 10, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley's announcement of $650 million for transportation projects in the Washington suburbs is welcome news for some Marylanders, but it also highlights serious concerns about how new gas tax money is allocated ("O'Malley announces nearly $650M for county transportation improvements," July 9). Every major state transportation project since the mid-1990s has gone to the Washington region. Just the four largest projects in that period - the Inter-County Connector, the Woodrow Wilson Bridge and completion of the Metro system's Blue and Green lines - total over $5 billion.
NEWS
June 18, 2013
I was happy to see the benefits of intermodal transportation for city residents so clearly described in a recent Sun commentary ("Put people ahead of cars," June 5). I've begun to see a transformation over the last decade in Baltimore, and I am encouraged that we may yet see more improvement in the future. As a daily commuter from Baltimore to Washington, D.C., intermodal transportation is a way of life for me. Each morning I set out from my Lauraville neighborhood to Penn Station by bicycle and catch the MARC train to Union Station.
NEWS
November 30, 2008
A major criticism of a government-financed stimulus package that relies on spending huge sums to rebuild the nation's public infrastructure is the lag between the measure's passage and the resulting jobs. Maryland Transportation Secretary John D. Porcari has good reason to think that's not much of a problem this time around. That's because he's got a stack of more than $310 million worth of transportation-related projects ready to go. In some cases, there are jobs that might literally be created within hours of the bill's enactment - resurfacing contracts, for instance, that can be immediately expanded to restore miles of aging highway.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2013
Wednesday's appointment of former Baltimore County Executive James T. Smith Jr. as Maryland's secretary of transportation removes one prominent name from the guessing game over who the leading Democratic contenders for governor will choose as their running mates. Smith said Wednesday that he has no interest in any job other than his new one running the transportation department. Gov. Martin O'Malley announced the appointment at a news conference with Smith at the site of a new Beltway expansion project near Frederick Road.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2013
The House of Delegates voted Friday to raise taxes on gasoline for the first time since 1992, heeding Gov. Martin O'Malley's call for an infusion of money to pay for roads, mass transit and other transportation priorities. House passage, by an unofficial vote of 76-63, sends the legislation to the Senate, where it has the strong support of President Thomas V. Mike Miller. The bill's passage was driven primarily by the votes of Democrats from Baltimore and the large urban counties.
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