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By Greg Schneider and Greg Schneider,SUN STAFF | September 4, 1996
AlliedSignal Aerospace had a busy day yesterday at the Farnborough Air Show in England, announcing a pair of developments that benefit its Communications Systems operation in Towson.A precision runway monitor system developed at the Joppa Road facility won final acceptance from the Federal Aviation Administration for use at the Minneapolis-St. Paul Airport.And the British military agreed to purchase customized friend-or-foe identification transponders for certain long-range support helicopters.
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2011
The multistate consortium that runs the E-ZPass toll collection system has agreed to a deal that would cut the cost of each transponder issued by its member toll authorities, including Maryland's, by more than half. TollRoadsnews reported that the E-ZPass Interagency Group has chosen Kapsch TrafficCom IVHS Inc. as its supplier for the next generation of toll-collection devices. The Frederick-based trade publication calculated that Kapsch's bid would lower the per-unit cost of transponders from $20.95 to $8.90.
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2011
The multistate consortium that runs the E-ZPass toll collection system has agreed to a deal that would cut the cost of each transponder issued by its member toll authorities, including Maryland's, by more than half. TollRoadsnews reported that the E-ZPass Interagency Group has chosen Kapsch TrafficCom IVHS Inc. as its supplier for the next generation of toll-collection devices. The Frederick-based trade publication calculated that Kapsch's bid would lower the per-unit cost of transponders from $20.95 to $8.90.
SPORTS
May 14, 2011
The folks who decide how we gather and protect the Chesapeake Bay's bounty may need to borrow Capt. Jack Sparrow's wacky compass to keep their bearings. Clearly, the headline-grabbing activities of poachers last year and this year have presented the state and its fisheries managers with a window of opportunity to make sweeping changes that address sustainability, accountability and enforceability, not only on the commercial side but on the recreational side, too. But given the attention span of our lawmakers, that window won't be open very long.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | November 12, 2004
The Coast Guard and others charged with protecting the nation's waterfront from terrorism are turning to radio to track thousands of ships that call on the United States each year. Still in testing, very high frequency, or VHF, radio receivers eventually could be planted on piers, blimps, satellites and weather buoys flanking the coasts. One test receiver was placed south of Annapolis about a year ago. The receivers will collect signals from transponders that all big ships will have to install by the end of the year and send the signals to 10 of the Coast Guard's ocean traffic control centers, the 361 U.S. ports and to others who might need to know what ship is where.
NEWS
By Newsday | September 16, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Federal investigators have discovered that the pilot who crashed a small plane on the White House grounds turned on a radar beacon designed to pinpoint his location for air-traffic controllers as he approached northwest Washington in the final minutes of his fatal flight.But Frank Corder, the Cessna pilot who died in the crash, did not use the proper location code for the transponder, as the device is known, and didn't attempt to contact controllers as required, a source close to the investigation said yesterday.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,michael.dresser@baltsun.com | January 12, 2009
For Asa Erickson, the Maryland Transportation Authority's proposal last week to charge a $1.50-a-month fee for an E-ZPass account is reason enough to drop the service. And he believes he's going to have a lot of company. "I'm not going to pay that fee," the 32-year-old northern Baltimore County resident said. "They're going to have a huge number of people dropping their accounts." Perhaps. But Maryland motorists are going to face two trends in the coming years: Toll roads are becoming more common, and toll booths are going extinct.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,STAFF WRITER | December 9, 1998
Ever wished you could breeze through a highway toll booth without stopping to pay?Early next year, Baltimore area commuters who use the Harbor Tunnel, the Fort McHenry Tunnel or the Francis Scott Key Bridge will have a chance to live that fantasy.The Maryland Transportation Authority is preparing to unveil a new electronic toll collection system that officials say should ease rush-hour backups at the three Patapsco River crossings.Similar to automated toll booths now operating in other urban areas, Maryland's high-tech system, dubbed "M-TAG," will allow motorists to use the two tunnels or the bridge without having to stop, roll down their windows and fumble for change.
NEWS
By Nia-Malika Henderson and Nia-Malika Henderson,sun reporter | November 2, 2006
The pilot of a single-engine plane that crashed at Tipton Airport, killing him and his passenger, failed to get flight clearance before takeoff, according to a preliminary investigation report. An employee of the airport in western Anne Arundel County told the pilot, Daniel L. Eberhardt, 57, of Downers Grove, Ill., after he filed his flight plan Oct. 19 that he needed a special code before heading into restricted airspace on his trip home, the National Transportation Safety Board said in the report released this week.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,laura.smitherman@baltsun.com | September 27, 2009
The Maryland Transportation Authority, inundated with requests from drivers to close E-ZPass accounts, says that the vendor administering the system has beefed up staffing and shortened the time it takes to process refunds. Account closures totaled 13,820 in July and August - or about eight times the average number of closures for a two-month period - after Maryland's E-ZPass program began charging owners of the electronic toll-collection devices a fee of $1.50 a month. Some motorists have complained that they were charged the fee as they were waiting for their accounts to be closed.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,laura.smitherman@baltsun.com | September 27, 2009
The Maryland Transportation Authority, inundated with requests from drivers to close E-ZPass accounts, says that the vendor administering the system has beefed up staffing and shortened the time it takes to process refunds. Account closures totaled 13,820 in July and August - or about eight times the average number of closures for a two-month period - after Maryland's E-ZPass program began charging owners of the electronic toll-collection devices a fee of $1.50 a month. Some motorists have complained that they were charged the fee as they were waiting for their accounts to be closed.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,michael.dresser@baltsun.com | January 12, 2009
For Asa Erickson, the Maryland Transportation Authority's proposal last week to charge a $1.50-a-month fee for an E-ZPass account is reason enough to drop the service. And he believes he's going to have a lot of company. "I'm not going to pay that fee," the 32-year-old northern Baltimore County resident said. "They're going to have a huge number of people dropping their accounts." Perhaps. But Maryland motorists are going to face two trends in the coming years: Toll roads are becoming more common, and toll booths are going extinct.
NEWS
By Nia-Malika Henderson and Nia-Malika Henderson,sun reporter | November 2, 2006
The pilot of a single-engine plane that crashed at Tipton Airport, killing him and his passenger, failed to get flight clearance before takeoff, according to a preliminary investigation report. An employee of the airport in western Anne Arundel County told the pilot, Daniel L. Eberhardt, 57, of Downers Grove, Ill., after he filed his flight plan Oct. 19 that he needed a special code before heading into restricted airspace on his trip home, the National Transportation Safety Board said in the report released this week.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | November 12, 2004
The Coast Guard and others charged with protecting the nation's waterfront from terrorism are turning to radio to track thousands of ships that call on the United States each year. Still in testing, very high frequency, or VHF, radio receivers eventually could be planted on piers, blimps, satellites and weather buoys flanking the coasts. One test receiver was placed south of Annapolis about a year ago. The receivers will collect signals from transponders that all big ships will have to install by the end of the year and send the signals to 10 of the Coast Guard's ocean traffic control centers, the 361 U.S. ports and to others who might need to know what ship is where.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | May 14, 2004
SAN DIEGO - Smith Charlotte is living her life in the fast lane, and she loves it. Her extended family drives about 20 vehicles - each equipped with a cigarette-case-size transponder that lets them use the express toll lanes along heavily traveled Interstate 15 north of this Southern California city. On many days, the Chula Vista resident pays as much as $4 each way - deducted from her account each time the transponder beeps - to zip along the center lanes while motorists in the free lanes are at a crawl.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | May 7, 1999
Relief for highway traffic congestion may soon be just a few computer bytes away.Aiming to move truck traffic more efficiently, the state Department of Transportation unveiled yesterday a computerized inspection system that allows a truck to be weighed in Maryland and not have to stop for another inspection anywhere on the East Coast."
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein | December 29, 1992
The Baltimore Arena's latest electrical problem, whic occurred Saturday night during the fourth quarter of the Washington Bullets' game with the Detroit Pistons, was apparently a new one: a transponder that short-circuited a bank of lights on the west end of the building."
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | May 14, 2004
SAN DIEGO - Smith Charlotte is living her life in the fast lane, and she loves it. Her extended family drives about 20 vehicles - each equipped with a cigarette-case-size transponder that lets them use the express toll lanes along heavily traveled Interstate 15 north of this Southern California city. On many days, the Chula Vista resident pays as much as $4 each way - deducted from her account each time the transponder beeps - to zip along the center lanes while motorists in the free lanes are at a crawl.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,STAFF WRITER | December 9, 1998
Ever wished you could breeze through a highway toll booth without stopping to pay?Early next year, Baltimore area commuters who use the Harbor Tunnel, the Fort McHenry Tunnel or the Francis Scott Key Bridge will have a chance to live that fantasy.The Maryland Transportation Authority is preparing to unveil a new electronic toll collection system that officials say should ease rush-hour backups at the three Patapsco River crossings.Similar to automated toll booths now operating in other urban areas, Maryland's high-tech system, dubbed "M-TAG," will allow motorists to use the two tunnels or the bridge without having to stop, roll down their windows and fumble for change.
BUSINESS
By Greg Schneider and Greg Schneider,SUN STAFF | September 4, 1996
AlliedSignal Aerospace had a busy day yesterday at the Farnborough Air Show in England, announcing a pair of developments that benefit its Communications Systems operation in Towson.A precision runway monitor system developed at the Joppa Road facility won final acceptance from the Federal Aviation Administration for use at the Minneapolis-St. Paul Airport.And the British military agreed to purchase customized friend-or-foe identification transponders for certain long-range support helicopters.
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