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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | August 15, 2012
Johns Hopkins doctors have received approval from the university's institutional review board to begin doing face transplant surgeries, becoming the second hospital in Baltimore to offer the complex procedure. There have been only 22 such operations around the world, including the most extensive one ever performed earlier this year at the University of Maryland Shock Trauma Center. Read details in this Baltimore Sun story . The procedures now can include not only tissue but underlying bones from a donor.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2014
Extra attention to hygiene means fewer germs are infecting people in health care settings these days, but particularly hardy bacteria called Clostridium difficile are defying the trend - and even gaining in strength. Patients endure round after round of antibiotics to knock out the bug, known as C. diff., which causes abdominal pain, extreme diarrhea and potentially fatal inflammation of the colon. Increasingly, however, doctors are turning to a cure that may seem every bit as yucky as the problem.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2014
Extra attention to hygiene means fewer germs are infecting people in health care settings these days, but particularly hardy bacteria called Clostridium difficile are defying the trend - and even gaining in strength. Patients endure round after round of antibiotics to knock out the bug, known as C. diff., which causes abdominal pain, extreme diarrhea and potentially fatal inflammation of the colon. Increasingly, however, doctors are turning to a cure that may seem every bit as yucky as the problem.
NEWS
February 25, 2014
When I first moved to Maryland seven years ago, I was excited to leave Pennsylvania and become a permanent resident of this beautiful state, especially moving to the top of the Chesapeake Bay and residing on the water in Havre de Grace. Shortly after that our youngest daughter transferred during her freshman year from West Chester University, in Pennsylvania, to Towson University. We did everything by the book, registered our cars, filed our taxes, surrendered our Pennsylvania licenses and received Maryland licenses.
BUSINESS
November 28, 1996
Johns Hopkins announced yesterday that it is consolidating its organ and bone marrow transplant services in a new Johns Hopkins Comprehensive Transplant Center.As part of the organizational change, the kidney transplant program will be moved from Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center to Johns Hopkins Hospital."This lets us better serve patients, achieve economies and plan physician and staff time more efficiently," said Ronald Peterson, acting president of the Johns Hopkins Health System.Dr.
NEWS
By Yeganeh June Torbati, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2011
Former Baltimorean Greg Wise, who moved to York eight years ago to be closer to his aging parents, says he can easily identify new Maryland transplants who have joined him in the northern migration just across the Pennsylvania line. They're called "white-taggers," he said, because they have yet to change over to Pennsylvania license plates. He estimates that about one-fourth of those commuting south on Interstate 83 with him every morning still have Maryland tags. Long considered a Baltimore exurb, York County has seen its population swell 14 percent since 2000.
NEWS
By Susan Peterson and Susan Peterson,Orange County Register | November 9, 1990
IRVINE, Calif. -- Scientists at the University of California in Irvine have successfully transplanted the leg of one rat onto another rat without setting off an internal biological war.The experiment was performed without the use of immunosuppressive drugs or radiation normally required in transplants to prevent tissue rejection.The study has sparked a debate among immunologists, who are unsure whether it means that two immune systems worked simultaneously in the same animal, or what the results might mean for human transplants.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | April 27, 1995
CHICAGO -- Researchers from Chicago, New York and Florida report the first proof that fetal tissue transplants survived, grew and functioned in the brain of a Parkinson's patient, a milestone that eventually may lead to new therapies for Huntington's, Alzheimer's, strokes and other disorders.The transplant was linked to a significant improvement in the patient's condition, freeing him from the prison of rigidity and immobility, the main symptoms of the disease, and enabling him to enroll in an exercise class.
NEWS
February 20, 2000
Q. I'm confused about what kind of lights to use indoors to grow flower and vegetable transplants. Do I need special growing lights? A. No, all you need are inexpensive cool white fluorescent tubes. Most of the light they produce is in the blue segment of the spectrum, but that's fine for growing foliage. Keep them lighted for at least 14 hours each day and position them only 1 to 2 inches above the tops of your plants. Q.I was amazed to see my daffodils pop out of the ground in early December.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 12, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The Food and Drug Administration announced yesterday that beginning next week it would regulate the sale of bone, skin and other tissues used for transplants to help protect recipients from infection with the virus that causes AIDS.Two years ago, officials found that a Virginia donor who died in a 1985 shooting had been infected with HIV, even though two tests on his blood before the removal of his organs and tissues did not detect the human immunodeficiency virus. Three people who had received transplants from the donor later died of AIDS.
HEALTH
By Kevin Rector and Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | December 31, 2013
When John Davis' kidney began failing in January, his girlfriend's mother decided to donate one of her kidneys to help save his life. That the two weren't actually a "match" - meaning Davis' body would never accept her kidney - didn't matter. In a groundbreaking program at Johns Hopkins Hospital that is as much about nationwide networking as it is medical innovation, kidney transplants are being arranged not through isolated pairings of patient and donor, but through longer and longer chains of individuals who don't even know each other.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | October 5, 2013
Amazing how a name can trigger a sudden burst of memories. "Hello, this is Ryan Wineke," a voice on the phone said. The name is pronounced "Win-ek-ee. " As soon as I heard it, I thought of Larry Wineke, the only man I ever knew by that name. I assumed he must have run out of time. "You wrote a story about my dad 18 years ago," the young man on the phone said. Indeed I had. Larry Wineke - Calvert Hall teacher and coach, big man, tough man and teddy bear - had a heart transplant at Johns Hopkins Hospital on Thanksgiving morning, Nov. 23, 1995.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | July 23, 2013
A Swiss businessman has given the The University of Maryland School of Medicine $2.5 million to create a professorship in plastic and reconstructive surgery with the first awarded to the doctor who recently performed a groundbreaking face transplant. Dr. Eduardo D. Rodriguez will be invested at a ceremony later this year. He led a team last year in a 36-hour face transplant that included replacement of both jaws, teeth, tongue, skin and underlying nerve and muscle tissue from the scalp to the neck.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2013
Maryland Shock Trauma Center patients who had previously undergone kidney, liver, lung and other organ transplants recovered as well as the general population, according to a University of Maryland study that experts say demonstrates the resiliency of transplanted organs. But they were more likely than their peers who had not suffered traumatic injuries to later reject transplanted organs, the study found. That raises new questions about the immune response that trauma can trigger and how it affects transplant patients.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2013
Services for 6-year-old Teresa Bartlinski will be held at St. Mark Church in Catonsville on Friday and Saturday, the family's pastor said Tuesday. Viewings for the child, who died Monday at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, will be held Friday from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. and 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., the Rev. Christopher J. Whatley said. The church is at 30 Melvin Avenue. A Mass of Christian burial will be celebrated at 10 a.m. Saturday. A burial in Woodlawn will follow. Teresa, who was born in China with a congenital heart disease, died after an unsuccessful attempt by doctors to implant an artificial heart in her chest.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2013
As they cradled her lifeless body Monday, Ed and Ann Bartlinski tried to picture their 6-year-old daughter on a bicycle pedaling toward heaven, to celebrate her life as a miracle, rather than see her death as a sign of unanswered prayers. Teresa Bartlinski, an effervescent child abandoned after birth in a village on the banks of China's Yellow River, died at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia after doctors attempted to implant an artificial heart in her chest. Three years after her adoption by the Catonsville family, Teresa had already outlived everyone's expectations.
NEWS
By Sue Miller and Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff | May 13, 1991
Knee and hip transplants, rather than artificial joints, can be the best treatment for young, active people who need replacement joints, says Dr. Allan Gross, a University of Toronto orthopedic surgeon and pioneer in the field.One of Gross' next patients will be a 15-year-old Baltimore County youth who fractured his hip in 1989 in a water skiing accident.For 18 years, Gross has used cartilage and the underlying bone of knee joints from healthy donors under 30 who die in car crashes to help others whose joints have been destroyed by similar violence.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 14, 2006
NEWARK, N.J. --Three times, the Waters family knew the bone-deep dread of losing their baby, Noble Tyre Waters, who had a severely diseased colon and needed a transplant. After undergoing three transplants, Noble died five years ago at the age of 15 months. "I can't begin to imagine the pain and agony for those families who were able to extend our son's life, but I can imagine the joy, when hope seemed not to exist, of being told three times that our son had gotten a reprieve," said Noble's father, Robert Kevin Waters, who sponsors a Little League team called the Lifesavers to help spread the word about organ donations.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2013
Doctors determined that Teresa Bartlinski, the 6-year-old Catonsville girl struggling to accept a donor's heart, will be re-listed on the transplant list. The family announced on their blog, ourplacecalledhome.blogspot.com, that Teresa will remain on life support at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia until Monday when she will receive an artificial heart to bridge the time until another donor heart is available. The child, who was born in China with a congenital heart disease, waited for nearly a year for the heart transplant she received less than two weeks ago. Teresa was adopted by a devout Roman Catholic family from Catonsville that has enlisted their church, St. Mark, and community to pray for a miracle.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2013
Ann Bartlinski placed the Eucharist and a pearl-beaded rosary blessed by the hands of the late Pope John Paul II on the chest of her 6-year-old daughter, Teresa, who lay Tuesday in a hospital bed, her tiny body rejecting a donor's heart. Teresa remained still, connected to life support at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia while her parents, Ed and Ann Bartlinski of Catonsville, their parish priest, the Rev. Christopher J. Whatley of St. Mark Church, and the community prayed for a miracle.
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