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NEWS
By Jonathan Bor | September 10, 1990
People called him crazy. During his four years as the only surgeon transplanting kidneys and hearts at the University of Maryland Hospital, Dr. Thomas Coughlin took exactly two weeks of vacation. The rest of the time, he operated seven days a week and remained on call 24 hours a day -- running a one-man transplant program that, in his words, "was run on a shoestring."Last June, he left quietly to join the heart transplant team at the Washington Hospital Center in the District of Columbia, home to one of the most prestigious cardiac surgery centers on the East Coast.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2012
Think of Dorry Segev and Sommer Gentry as intellectual magpies. The glittery ideas they filch from fields as diverse as swing dancing, systems analysis, water skiing and medicine seemingly have little in common. But Segev and Gentry weave them together into a strong yet flexible structure designed to protect fragile lives. Segev, 41, is a transplant surgeon at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, a pianist who studied at Juilliard and a former computer prodigy. Gentry, 35, an assistant mathematics professor at the Naval Academy, was a doctoral student when she caught the public's attention by designing a dancing robot.
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NEWS
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,SUN STAFF | March 24, 1996
Just before rush hour on a gray Monday in November, transplant surgeon John V. Conte Jr. runs out of the University of Maryland, jumps into a waiting Jeep with a makeshift siren and heads down Interstate 95 toward Alexandria General Hospital in Virginia. He's after a set of lungs.At 36, Dr. Conte is one of six surgeons at Maryland working to build one of the country's top transplant programs. Like his colleagues, he's young, willing to take risks to help patients and able to survive on very little sleep.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2012
Facebook has launched a program to promote organ donation, which grew from a conversation between the social media company's chief operating officer and a Johns Hopkins surgeon already passionate about the cause. COO Sheryl Sandberg and Dr. Andrew M. Cameron took the chat they had about the shortage of organs at their 20th college reunion at Harvard University and turned it into reality. Facebook announced Tuesday a new organ transplant initiative that could reach hundreds of millions of people around the world.
NEWS
August 11, 1998
An article in Saturday's editions of The Sun incorrectly stated the specialties of two physicians who joined the Johns Hopkins Comprehensive Transplant Center from the transplant program at University of Maryland Medical Center. Dr. John V. Conte Jr. is a transplant surgeon. Dr. Jonathan B. Orens is a pulmonary specialist who will be medical director of Hopkins' lung transplant program.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 8/11/98
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Chris Emery and Dennis O'Brien and Chris Emery,Sun Reporters | April 3, 2007
The U.S Justice Department has cleared the way for hospitals nationwide to begin performing what is now a rare transplant operation in which multiple donors give kidneys to unrelated recipients. The decision is being hailed as a step that will save thousands of people who would otherwise die awaiting new kidneys. "It's a huge thing," said Dr. Richard B. Freeman, chairman of the legislative committee of the American Society of Transplant Surgeons. "It's going to make dramatic difference in removing barriers we've all faced trying to perform paired transplants," said Freeman, a surgeon at Tufts-New England Medical Center in Boston.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | April 29, 2002
When David Kieffer offered to give up 60 percent of his liver to save his ailing friend's life, doctors launched into what would seem an endless series of warnings. He was a healthy young man electing to undergo major surgery for no reason but to help someone else. He could suffer serious complications, even die. With that in mind, they said, he could back out at any time, right up to the hour of surgery. But Kieffer, saying he was motivated by friendship and God, went through with the 12-hour operation two weeks ago at Johns Hopkins Hospital.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2012
Facebook has launched a program to promote organ donation, which grew from a conversation between the social media company's chief operating officer and a Johns Hopkins surgeon already passionate about the cause. COO Sheryl Sandberg and Dr. Andrew M. Cameron took the chat they had about the shortage of organs at their 20th college reunion at Harvard University and turned it into reality. Facebook announced Tuesday a new organ transplant initiative that could reach hundreds of millions of people around the world.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2012
Think of Dorry Segev and Sommer Gentry as intellectual magpies. The glittery ideas they filch from fields as diverse as swing dancing, systems analysis, water skiing and medicine seemingly have little in common. But Segev and Gentry weave them together into a strong yet flexible structure designed to protect fragile lives. Segev, 41, is a transplant surgeon at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, a pianist who studied at Juilliard and a former computer prodigy. Gentry, 35, an assistant mathematics professor at the Naval Academy, was a doctoral student when she caught the public's attention by designing a dancing robot.
HEALTH
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2010
The opera singer who eventually became Dr. Robert A. Montgomery's wife would never have taken him for a kidney transplant surgeon the first time she saw him, not with the long hair and that outrageous mustache. Maybe a biker, she figured, and maybe she was onto something there. When he heads for work at Johns Hopkins Hospital from his loft in Fells Point or the manse he shares in Bethesda with Denyce Graves, the internationally known mezzo soprano, Montgomery roars off in his 500-horsepower Shelby Cobra, painted white with a blue stripe down the center.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Chris Emery and Dennis O'Brien and Chris Emery,Sun Reporters | April 3, 2007
The U.S Justice Department has cleared the way for hospitals nationwide to begin performing what is now a rare transplant operation in which multiple donors give kidneys to unrelated recipients. The decision is being hailed as a step that will save thousands of people who would otherwise die awaiting new kidneys. "It's a huge thing," said Dr. Richard B. Freeman, chairman of the legislative committee of the American Society of Transplant Surgeons. "It's going to make dramatic difference in removing barriers we've all faced trying to perform paired transplants," said Freeman, a surgeon at Tufts-New England Medical Center in Boston.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | April 29, 2002
When David Kieffer offered to give up 60 percent of his liver to save his ailing friend's life, doctors launched into what would seem an endless series of warnings. He was a healthy young man electing to undergo major surgery for no reason but to help someone else. He could suffer serious complications, even die. With that in mind, they said, he could back out at any time, right up to the hour of surgery. But Kieffer, saying he was motivated by friendship and God, went through with the 12-hour operation two weeks ago at Johns Hopkins Hospital.
NEWS
August 11, 1998
An article in Saturday's editions of The Sun incorrectly stated the specialties of two physicians who joined the Johns Hopkins Comprehensive Transplant Center from the transplant program at University of Maryland Medical Center. Dr. John V. Conte Jr. is a transplant surgeon. Dr. Jonathan B. Orens is a pulmonary specialist who will be medical director of Hopkins' lung transplant program.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 8/11/98
NEWS
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,SUN STAFF | March 24, 1996
Just before rush hour on a gray Monday in November, transplant surgeon John V. Conte Jr. runs out of the University of Maryland, jumps into a waiting Jeep with a makeshift siren and heads down Interstate 95 toward Alexandria General Hospital in Virginia. He's after a set of lungs.At 36, Dr. Conte is one of six surgeons at Maryland working to build one of the country's top transplant programs. Like his colleagues, he's young, willing to take risks to help patients and able to survive on very little sleep.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor | September 10, 1990
People called him crazy. During his four years as the only surgeon transplanting kidneys and hearts at the University of Maryland Hospital, Dr. Thomas Coughlin took exactly two weeks of vacation. The rest of the time, he operated seven days a week and remained on call 24 hours a day -- running a one-man transplant program that, in his words, "was run on a shoestring."Last June, he left quietly to join the heart transplant team at the Washington Hospital Center in the District of Columbia, home to one of the most prestigious cardiac surgery centers on the East Coast.
FEATURES
June 19, 2008
*The Institute for Foot and Ankle Reconstruction at Mercy Medical Center has hired Dr. Rebecca A Cerrato, a fellow under Dr. Mark Myerson's Foot and Ankle Fellowship. She is a graduate of the University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine. She completed several residency programs, including one at the University of Chicago Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Rehabilitation and another at the Georgetown University Department of Orthopaedics. Cerrato has research experience at the Institute of Foot and Ankle Reconstruction, the National Institute of Health/NIAMS and the University of Chicago Department of Orthopaedics.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | April 22, 2005
A larger, more efficient system for matching kidney donors with recipients would save hundreds of lives and hundreds of millions of dollars every year, according to a new study by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Hospital and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Their paper, published this week in the Journal of the American Medical Association, looked at paired donation, a relatively new transplant method that has grown more popular in recent years. Here's how it works: For a kidney transplant to be successful, the donor and recipient must be medically compatible.
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