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By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,Evening Sun Staff | December 30, 1991
The head of the state's organ-transplant center has a request for families during this holiday season: Discuss with your loved ones the possibility of donating your organs.You could save someone's life.Mark Reiner, executive director of the Transplant Resource Center of Maryland, says nearly 300 Marylanders are on a waiting list for organ donations.He says about 23,000 people are on a waiting list nationwide at a time when the pool of potential donors is diminishing because of improved trauma care and stricter safety laws, resulting in fewer accident-related deaths.
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NEWS
August 22, 1999
Transplant Center is bringing more organs to MarylandIn response to Judy LaSov's letter, "Health system has failed Maryland's transplant patients" (Aug. 9), I'd like to point out that 387 people received life-saving organ transplants during 1998 at the Johns Hopkins Hospital and the University of Maryland Medical System.Two hundred-four of those patients received kidney transplants. The patients received 226 locally recovered organs and 224 organs imported from other areas of the country.
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NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,SUN STAFF | December 17, 1998
The gift was simply too much. The two Baltimore women weren't cousins or even best friends, just co-workers friendly in the office.But Margie Goralski Stickles wanted to give Rhonda DeLaremore a kidney.So yesterday morning, after clasping hands on side-by-side gurneys, the women were rolled into surgery at the University of Maryland Medical Center. Physicians removed Stickles' left kidney. By early afternoon, it was in DeLaremore and appeared to be working fine."I prayed for a miracle, and it was Margie," said DeLaremore.
NEWS
July 30, 1999
Transplant patients are ill-served by organ rule changesI appreciate The Sun's editorial support of Maryland patients on the kidney transplant waiting list ("Playing politics with life-saving transplants," July 25).The rule changes that the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) instituted June 24 demote Maryland patients waiting for perfectly matched kidneys and send a message to future patients to choose a state other than Maryland.We think that's unfair. It's bad medicine, and it violates patients' rights.
NEWS
November 24, 1998
An article in Friday's editions incorrectly referred to the Transplant Resource Center of Maryland Inc., as the Maryland Transplant Resource Center. The same article misspelled the surname and misstated the title of Marion Borowiecki, its chief executive officer.The Sun regrets the errors.Pub Date: 11/24/98
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Staff Writer | February 27, 1992
Sixty-two Maryland families donated relatives' organs for transplant in 1991, up 19 percent from the year before, according to the Transplant Resource Center of Maryland.The donations gave new hope to 192 patients whose own hearts, lungs, kidneys or other organs had failed.But the center's executive director, Mark Reiner, said the need for organ donations continues to outstrip the supply. More than 400 Marylanders, and 23,000 people nationwide, are waiting on a variety of lists for suitable organs to become available.
NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Staff Writer | April 19, 1993
Rick Fetters' 11-year-old son died of liver cancer in 1987, but the Savage resident still considers his son fortunate."He really got the most precious gift people can give," Mr. Fetters said yesterday. His son, Jason, received a liver transplant in March 1987, becoming Johns Hopkins Hospital's first pediatric liver transplant recipient. The boy died five months later after cancer struck again.Yesterday, Mr. Fetters was among about 40 people who attended Howard County General Hospital's fourth annual Candlelight Service of Thanksgiving, honoring Maryland's organ and tissue donors and transplant recipients.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | November 20, 1998
A national organ-sharing network withdrew sanctions yesterday that would have forced Maryland's primary transplant center to severely curb the use of kidneys for transplants in the state.The move was a pardon of sorts for the Maryland Transplant Resource Center and dozens of local patients awaiting kidney transplants who would have dropped to the bottom of a national waiting list for organs.The United Network for Organ Sharing, a nonprofit group that holds a federal contract to enforce transplant policy nationwide, threatened in June to restrict Maryland's access to organs to reconcile the state's 67-kidney "debt."
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | October 7, 1998
A national organ-sharing network is threatening sanctions that could severely curb the state's ability to obtain kidneys for local transplants -- a move that could have life-or-death consequences for scores of patients in Maryland.Two of Maryland's most prominent hospitals -- Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and the University of Maryland Medical Center -- have been so successful in their transplant programs that they have inadvertently helped give the state the largest kidney "debt" in the nation.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | September 27, 1994
The record says Judy Verblin died late last winter, but maybe the record has it wrong.That she was stricken, there is no doubt. She'd had a bad heart attack four years ago, and then some smaller attacks since, and on that last morning in March she awoke in her Northwest Baltimore home and was getting ready for work at the Baltimore County Courts Building when she was hit by severe chest pains.She was rushed to the hospital, and the doctors did what they could. It wasn't enough. She'd had a stroke, and a blood vessel had ruptured in her brain, and she was declared dead on March 20.There were people from all over the place at Verblin's funeral, those she'd known from her courthouse days, those with whom she'd worked in the Baltimore County Circuit Court's land records department, those she'd known over the 52 years of her life.
NEWS
By Jamal E. Watson and SUN STAFF | January 2, 1999
For years, surgeon Rose-Marie Toussaint aggressively fought to keep her patients alive long enough for kidney and liver transplants. But the slender, soft-spoken Toussaint would quickly learn a sad reality: Because of a shortage of donated organs, many died long before they became serious candidates for a transplant. "Twelve patients die [nationwide] every day waiting for an organ," said Toussaint, who lives in North Laurel with her husband, Michael. "This is not acceptable.
NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,SUN STAFF | December 17, 1998
The gift was simply too much. The two Baltimore women weren't cousins or even best friends, just co-workers friendly in the office.But Margie Goralski Stickles wanted to give Rhonda DeLaremore a kidney.So yesterday morning, after clasping hands on side-by-side gurneys, the women were rolled into surgery at the University of Maryland Medical Center. Physicians removed Stickles' left kidney. By early afternoon, it was in DeLaremore and appeared to be working fine."I prayed for a miracle, and it was Margie," said DeLaremore.
NEWS
November 24, 1998
An article in Friday's editions incorrectly referred to the Transplant Resource Center of Maryland Inc., as the Maryland Transplant Resource Center. The same article misspelled the surname and misstated the title of Marion Borowiecki, its chief executive officer.The Sun regrets the errors.Pub Date: 11/24/98
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | November 20, 1998
A national organ-sharing network withdrew sanctions yesterday that would have forced Maryland's primary transplant center to severely curb the use of kidneys for transplants in the state.The move was a pardon of sorts for the Maryland Transplant Resource Center and dozens of local patients awaiting kidney transplants who would have dropped to the bottom of a national waiting list for organs.The United Network for Organ Sharing, a nonprofit group that holds a federal contract to enforce transplant policy nationwide, threatened in June to restrict Maryland's access to organs to reconcile the state's 67-kidney "debt."
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | October 7, 1998
A national organ-sharing network is threatening sanctions that could severely curb the state's ability to obtain kidneys for local transplants -- a move that could have life-or-death consequences for scores of patients in Maryland.Two of Maryland's most prominent hospitals -- Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and the University of Maryland Medical Center -- have been so successful in their transplant programs that they have inadvertently helped give the state the largest kidney "debt" in the nation.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | September 27, 1994
The record says Judy Verblin died late last winter, but maybe the record has it wrong.That she was stricken, there is no doubt. She'd had a bad heart attack four years ago, and then some smaller attacks since, and on that last morning in March she awoke in her Northwest Baltimore home and was getting ready for work at the Baltimore County Courts Building when she was hit by severe chest pains.She was rushed to the hospital, and the doctors did what they could. It wasn't enough. She'd had a stroke, and a blood vessel had ruptured in her brain, and she was declared dead on March 20.There were people from all over the place at Verblin's funeral, those she'd known from her courthouse days, those with whom she'd worked in the Baltimore County Circuit Court's land records department, those she'd known over the 52 years of her life.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Staff writer | September 22, 1991
Kim Cunningham mourns her infant daughter; Carol Bryon oversees her year-old son's recovery from a life-threatening liver disease. This is the difference a few weeks can make in the world of organ transplants.The two women met at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore this year and shared the anguish of waiting for organ donations that mightsave their children's lives. Now they share a cause: banging the drum for more people to become organ donors."They say 10 percent of the people who could be organ donors actually are," said Bryon, of Davidsonville, who founded Donor Organ National Out Reach.
NEWS
August 22, 1999
Transplant Center is bringing more organs to MarylandIn response to Judy LaSov's letter, "Health system has failed Maryland's transplant patients" (Aug. 9), I'd like to point out that 387 people received life-saving organ transplants during 1998 at the Johns Hopkins Hospital and the University of Maryland Medical System.Two hundred-four of those patients received kidney transplants. The patients received 226 locally recovered organs and 224 organs imported from other areas of the country.
NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Staff Writer | April 19, 1993
Rick Fetters' 11-year-old son died of liver cancer in 1987, but the Savage resident still considers his son fortunate."He really got the most precious gift people can give," Mr. Fetters said yesterday. His son, Jason, received a liver transplant in March 1987, becoming Johns Hopkins Hospital's first pediatric liver transplant recipient. The boy died five months later after cancer struck again.Yesterday, Mr. Fetters was among about 40 people who attended Howard County General Hospital's fourth annual Candlelight Service of Thanksgiving, honoring Maryland's organ and tissue donors and transplant recipients.
NEWS
December 2, 1992
Organ DonorsAlice Steinbach's article in the Nov. 20 Sun, "A New Life Soothes the Pain Over One That Was Lost," was indeed a moving, hard-hitting piece. However, the article failed to emphasize that the only way we can have these heart-warming stories is if people realize the need for organs and donate them upon their death.The Transplant Resource Center of Maryland acted as a liaison between the Kleckners, the donor family and Ms. Steinbach. Therefore, we were quite upset to learn that there was no mention of the drastic need for organs or the procedures to follow to be an organ or tissue donor.
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