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By Helene Stapinski and Helene Stapinski,Special to the Sun | June 13, 2004
Transmission, by Hari Kunzru. Dutton. 278 pages. $24.95. Maybe it's his mocking tone. Or his runaway sentences. Perhaps it's overambition, trying to cram too much of our complicated, comic world between the cover of a single book. Whatever it is, Hari Kunzru's new novel, Transmission, his follow-up to The Impressionist, is very hard to take. The problem starts with the characters: a geeky computer engineer turned hacker, the loathsome head of a globalized branding agency and a beautiful but unloved Bollywood actress.
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BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2014
A helicopter will be hovering above power lines throughout Central Maryland in coming weeks, but don't worry. It's not the NSA. Baltimore Gas & Electric Co., which provides power to Maryland's most populated regions, will be contracting the utility helicopter to allow for inspections of its electric transmission equipment through next month, the company said Thursday. The helicopter will be used in Anne Arundel, Baltimore, Howard and Prince George's counties, and may be spotted "hovering near power lines and rights of way or following a flight path along electric transmission rights of way," the company said.
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BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,andrea.walker@baltsun.com | January 16, 2009
The General Motors Powertrain Baltimore Transmission Plant will likely have to shut down for a week next month unless demand for the company's vehicles improves. A spokesman for the plant said yesterday it is planning to close shop and temporarily lay off all 239 of it hourly workers for a week beginning Feb. 23. Seventy-nine employees have been laid off since last year because of a slowdown in production at the plant. It is temporarily closing because demand for GM vehicles is expected to remain weak as economic turmoil continues to hurt auto sales.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2014
Local medical professionals will gather with members of Baltimore's gay community later this month to discuss a new medical treatment that involves HIV-negative patients taking a daily pill to avoid becoming infected. The April 28 forum, hosted by the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Community Center of Baltimore, will cover the use of Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis, or PrEP, which "has been shown to reduce the risk of HIV infection among adult men and women at very high risk for HIV infection through sex or injecting drug use," according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
BUSINESS
By Leslie Cauley and Leslie Cauley,Staff Writer | April 18, 1992
When CBS Radio comes to town next month to do a baseball "Game of the Week" from Oriole Park at Camden Yards, you won't find the usual equipment in tow.Gone from the parking lot will be the two or three trucks with roof-mounted satellite dishes surrounded by yards of snaking cables, each the size of a forearm. Gone, too, will be the throngs of technicians who used to man those trucks and feeder cables.Their replacement: an aluminum attache case filled with electronics designed to take advantage of digital technology.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 2, 2004
JAKARTA, Indonesia - The World Health Organization said yesterday that two sisters who died in Vietnam's Thai Binh province last week were victims of avian influenza and might have contracted the disease from their brother. If confirmed, the sisters' deaths would represent the first human-to-human transmission of the illness. Until now, health officials had concluded that human victims in Vietnam and Thailand were contracting the virus through direct contact with infected fowl. The deaths of the two women bring to 10 the number of confirmed bird flu deaths in Vietnam.
BUSINESS
April 27, 2008
Production halted at GM A strike at General Motors' chief axle supplier halted production at GM Powertrain's Baltimore Transmission Plant. About 280 hourly workers were laid off at the White Marsh plant. Operations ceased April 7 when workers stopped manufacturing a hybrid transmission for the Chevrolet Tahoe. Production of a transmission for the Chevrolet Silverado and GMC Sierra was stopped March 10. Port cargo rises to $41.5 billion Propelled by a weakening dollar, a surge of exports - especially autos - drove the value of cargo moving through the port of Baltimore last year to a record $41.5 billion, though tonnage increased less than 1 percent, the Maryland Port Authority reported.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | August 20, 2003
Congress is likely to create mandatory standards for companies that transmit electric power and penalize those that fail to comply, President Bush said yesterday. Proponents say mandatory "reliability standards" could help ease transmission problems and avert massive blackouts. "Nothing is mandatory right now; we have a voluntary system," said Ellen Vancko, a spokeswoman for the North American Electric Reliability Council, a lead investigator into the blackout that cut power Thursday to about 50 million people in eight states and Canada.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,Sun reporter | October 3, 2007
General Motors Corp.'s proposed labor contract appears to offer good news for its White Marsh transmission plant. The deal calls for production through at least 2012 at the three plants the facility supplies with transmissions, the United Auto Workers said yesterday. The plants are in Flint and Pontiac, Mich., and Arlington, Texas. "It's going to directly affect us on a positive side -- we're going to have longevity just like they do," said Fred Swanner, president of UAW Local 239, which represents nearly 370 White Marsh workers.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | September 21, 1995
LIFE IS FULL of unnerving sounds, and yet there's nothing quite like the sound of a transmission dropping out of your car.To be honest, I had never heard the sound of a transmission dropping out of my car before. But I know what it sounds like now. And I know that it's soon followed by another sound, a cash register ringing in some grimy garage as you fork over $1,200 to a grinning mechanic standing under the obligatory Miss Valvoline poster.To recap the whole ugly business: A few days ago, my wife and I were driving along, singing a song, when all of sudden a horrible grinding sound came from under the hood.
NEWS
February 28, 2014
It makes no sense to invest billions of dollars into such a dead-end technology as oil pipelines which will be obsolete and of ever-declining value over the next dozen years as we burn up yet more and more of our declining fossil reserves ( "Keystone XL is one more hole in a sinking ship," Feb. 5). Instead, we should be investing in long-distance electric transmission lines to move our unlimited, renewable, 100 percent American electricity resources from where they are plentiful to where they are needed.
NEWS
By Diane Leopold | December 4, 2013
The liquefied natural gas (LNG) facility at the Dominion Cove Point Terminal has long been a model of industrial and environmental cooperation. More than 1,000 acres of pristine beach, forest and marsh lands in southern Maryland are conserved, while at the same time the Chesapeake Bay is unharmed. Dominion is proud of its award-winning role as an environmental steward at Cove Point and has designed its proposed LNG export project to continue that commitment. The Baltimore Sun's Sunday editorial calling for greater scrutiny of the project fails to take these facts and many more into account.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2013
Technical difficulties, as they euphemistically say in broadcasting, left some NPR affiliates like Baltimore's WYPR scrambling Monday morning. WYPR confirmed that it had problems with the National Public Radio feed Monday. WTMD General Manager Steve Yasko said he believed there had been problems at his station as well, but he did not have the specifics because his morning team was gone for the day when The Sun called. The trouble started at 6 a.m., according to WYPR's Nathan Sterner, who is on-air from Baltimore weekdays during NPR's "Morning Edition.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | December 21, 2012
Power has been restored to Annapolis homes and businesses and other nearby parts of Anne Arundel County after Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. reported a disruption to two main lines servicing the area Thursday night. Off-duty city police officers were called in to help direct traffic at blackened intersections throughout the city, and county officers had to assist in getting people out of the Annapolis Mall, said Lt. Glenn Shanahan, a county police spokesman. Anne Arundel Medical Center ran on generators, awaiting word as to when the power would return, a spokeswoman said.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson and Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2012
Commuters north of downtown will see major traffic disruptions Thursday, as Baltimore deals with another problem with its aging water infrastructure - this time the failure of a 90-year-old main that closed the intersection of North Charles Street and North Avenue. Public water rushed south along Charles Street all day Wednesday, buckling pavement, shuttering businesses and temporarily displacing residents in the Charles North neighborhood after a 60-inch transmission pipe broke at the East 20th Street intersection.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2012
When police accused an Edgemere man of having sex with a 13-year-old boy, most of the charges were straightforward: soliciting a minor and a related sexual offense, which together could carry up to 30 years in prison. But Baltimore County prosecutors also accused Steven Douglas Podles of knowingly attempting to transmit the HIV virus to the boy - a seldom-used, and often controversial, charge that carries an additional three years behind bars. Even as prosecutors prepare their case against Podles, the effectiveness of such laws is being debated by legislators and public health officials from Maryland to California.
NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,SUN STAFF | March 30, 2000
Scientists have proved what they long suspected: The less virus in an HIV-infected person's blood, the less his or her chance of passing it on to a partner of the opposite sex. The large study, done by Johns Hopkins researchers in rural Uganda, found that with every 10-fold rise in the concentration of HIV in the bloodstream, transmission more than doubled. This common-sense notion has been shown in mother-to-baby HIV infection, but it had never been examined in sexual transmission, the predominant way people get HIV. Its implications are far-reaching, since certain medicines are able to lower the amounts of the human immunodeficiency virus in the bloodstream.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 30, 2004
BANGKOK, Thailand - A day after Thai and international officials confirmed the first probable human-to-human transmission of a virulent strain of avian influenza in this country, public health systems around the globe were scrambling to prepare for a possible pandemic. Scientists say they cannot predict how quickly, if at all, the strain might develop the ability to spread easily among people, and whether it will remain as lethal as it has proven. The strain, A(H5N1), has killed 30 of the 42 Southeast Asians it infected in the past year, as well as millions of chickens and wild birds, across wide areas of Asia, and it has infected pigs, household cats and even zoo tigers.
BUSINESS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2012
The state's power grid operator does not need a $3.3 billion pair of transmission line projects built through Maryland because the weak economy has slowed demand for electricity, the staff of operator PJM Interconnection has concluded. The staff will recommend that PJM's board cancel the Mid-Atlantic Power Pathway, or MAPP, and Potomac-Appalachian Transmission Highline, or PATH, because its analysis showed they are not needed to maintain reliability of the power grid, according to a presentation PJM released Wednesday.
NEWS
October 12, 2010
The forecast for the East Coast is windy with a chance of 6,000 megawatts — or enough electricity to power 1.9 million homes. That's what a $5 billion offshore transmission line proposal unveiled yesterday could make possible along the Atlantic Coast, and it's an exciting prospect for the nation's energy future. Atlantic Wind Connection, the planned 350-mile underwater line located 15 to 20 miles off the coast, would provide a connection for multiple offshore wind power projects including Delaware's proposed Bluewater Wind.
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