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By Alane Salierno Mason and Alane Salierno Mason,Special to the Sun | September 16, 2001
In times of economical air travel and weak European currencies, there's no excuse for not going to Italy. That doesn't mean, however, just retracing the steps of Frances Mayes from market to table in Under the Tuscan Sun. Nor does it mean that the Italy beloved around the world -- the Italy of delicate frescoes, Baroque churches like wedding cakes, exquisite food and wine, and warm, beautiful people, stylishly dressed -- is the only one worth visiting....
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NEWS
August 22, 2014
The BGE Smart Meter program is good for the company and punishes the opt-out consumer. The only way consumers benefit is if they choose not to bake, do laundry or vacuum on the days BGE chooses for energy savings. Why should BGE dictate my life? ( "Cost of not taking a smart meter arrives," Aug. 8). Some 350,000 customers have electric meters which are not accessible, and 20,000 have opted out. According to BGE's website, it has some 1.2 million customers, of which about 370,000 are customers without smart meters.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Alane Salierno Mason and Alane Salierno Mason,Special to the Sun | October 22, 2000
I was standing with my mother on the stoop of an unknown house. A woman answered the door and bent over to retrieve the newspaper lying before us on the doormat. "Do you know how to read yet?" she asked me, and I shook my head. "Oh, it will be so wonderful when you learn how to read!" she exclaimed, "You can learn about the whole world." I believed her. So, it saddens me that Americans are increasingly restricted in what they might read from the rest of the world. A recent survey by the NEA Literature Program showed that of the close to 13,000 works of fiction and poetry published in the United States in 1999, a total of 297 were translated from other languages, including new translations of classic works.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2014
William Smith's disease has grim milestones. At 2, the Gambrills triplet known as Mick couldn't walk or talk as well as his siblings. In kindergarten, he started losing language and motor skills. At 12, he needed a wheelchair and a feeding tube. Doctors at Johns Hopkins Hospital dedicated to treating his symptoms said he had an undiagnosed progressive neuromuscular disease. But a new test may provide something the family has long sought: a name. "The idea that there is something out there that can tell you [what's wrong]
ENTERTAINMENT
By Scott Timberg and Scott Timberg,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 7, 2004
Pick up the phone, and the American-sounding operator could be in India or the Philippines. In some states, we buy three times as many foreign cars as domestic ones. The all-American clothing of the Gap, Levi Strauss and Nike is produced mostly in Asia, and about 75 percent of the toys our children play with are made overseas. Americans live, these days, in an era of globalization. Money and goods, though, flow more rapidly into the United States than ideas and culture. As the country exports both Hollywood movies and occupying armies, it seems to be gradually closing its ears to foreign voices.
NEWS
By Leslie H. Gelb | February 20, 1991
EXCEPT WITH the help of expert analysts, cultural historians, unnamed sources and other decoders of gulfspeak, it is most difficult to understand what is really going on in the Persian Gulf war. The following is offered as a guide to oracular public statements and their proper interpretations.King Hussein of Jordan: This war should never have begun and could end even now, today, in peace for all our peoples, if the United States would allow an Arab solution to an Arab problem.Arab expert: The United States does not understand the peaceful ways of the Arab and the Arab genius for compromise and love.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2011
Nina R. Iwry, a reporter who had escaped from her native Poland with the outbreak of World War II, died Feb. 5 of heart failure at her Mount Washington home. She was 94. The daughter of a wealthy Jewish textile factory owner and a homemaker, Nina Rochman was born and raised in Lodz, Poland. Her parents and several siblings perished in the Holocaust. She was a graduate of the Gymnasia and earned a bachelor's degree and a master's degree in journalism in 1937 from Warsaw University.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | August 14, 2003
The final production in the Olney Theatre Center's Potomac Theatre Festival, Translations of Xhosa, opens tonight. Produced in association with the Boston University School of Theatre Arts, this one- woman, coming-of-age story is written and performed by Kira Lallas, a May graduate of the university. Set in Cape Town, South Africa, the multimedia play focuses on a pivotal day in the life of a 20-year-old American woman named Zandi. Direction is by Karen Michelle Stanley, another recent Boston University grad.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | January 17, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Last fall, Pope John Paul II delivered a speech in French on evolution to the Pontifical Academy of Science.The Catholic News Service and Vatican Information Service wrote stories quoting the pope as saying that evolution is "more than a hypothesis." The implication was that the church's historic teaching that man was uniquely created by God is itself evolving toward a scientific, non-creation model.That was the spin put on the pope's remarks by the New York Times, which carried a front-page story on this "new" teaching, and by other newspapers, the wire services and this columnist.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 4, 2014
Edward J. Rasmussen, a retired insurance broker who also translated Japanese, died June 20 of pneumonia at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. He was 95. The son of J. David Rasmussen, a New York City insurance broker, and Ellamae Rasmussen, a homemaker, Edward Jeppe Rasmussen was born in Brooklyn and spent his early years in Queens before moving with his family to Scarsdale. After graduating from Scarsdale High School in 1937, he earned a bachelor's degree in 1942 from Dartmouth College.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2014
Second in a series of profiles of candidates for governor. If a political resume were enough for victory, David R. Craig would be a sure thing to win the Republican nomination for governor. Havre de Grace city councilman, mayor, member of the House of Delegates, state senator, and for the past decade, Harford County executive. Craig has filled all those roles in his 64 years, and, judging by his election results, voters have been happy with the job he's done. "As county executive, I think he's done the kinds of things I'd like to see a governor do," said Ellen R. Sauerbrey, the Republican nominee in 1994 and 1998.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2014
Around the turn of the 20th century, ancient Chinese poetry grabbed fresh attention in the West and provided inspiration for some notable works. Austrian composer Gustav Mahler, for example, found in a set of German translations of Li Po the impetus to create "Das Lied von der Erde" ("The Song of the Earth"). And four years after the 1911 posthumous premiere of that profound music, American poet Ezra Pound published "Cathay," his influential interpretations of Li Po and other Chinese poets.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2013
I am going to be honest, I did not think Ray Lewis was going to be nearly as good on TV as he was on ESPN's "Sunday NFL Countdown Sunday" today. Frankly, some of the stuff Lewis said as a player sometimes sounded, well, a little off the wall. Like his comments last week about the power outage in the Super Bowl possibly being intentional. And I wondered how his incredible visceral intensity as a player would translate to the screen in a medium that favors cool. But after three hours of watching Lewis and his new TV teammates, I am here to tell you he had an outstanding debut.
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | August 24, 2013
It's probably a mistake to try to make sense out of the preseason performance of the Ravens so far, because it might make your head explode. The defending Super Bowl champions have been all over the map in their first three rehearsals for the Sept. 5 regular season opener against the Denver Broncos, so trying to draw any valid conclusions about the state of the team from its on-field performance or John Harbaugh's weekly postmortem is a dubious business. Remember, it was just last week that Harbaugh said at halftime that he had never seen his team play worse than the first string did against the Atlanta Falcons, which left everyone wondering just what he was going to say Thursday night after the Carolina Panthers scored four touchdowns on a punt return, two interceptions and a fumble recovery.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2013
Dr. Craig Hendrix is exploring a novel concept: whether antiviral drugs can be absorbed through certain areas of the body to prevent sexual transmission of HIV. To test such hypotheses, Hendrix and his Johns Hopkins colleagues typically can put up healthy test subjects in hospital beds overnight, which creates a more effective experiment by allowing for more data collection and limiting outside variables. But volunteers in Hendrix's study are sleeping in a hotel between two long days of blood-drawing and CT scans because of a funding squeeze in a innovative federal grant program.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2013
Teresa Hicks' career in the Navy stretches back 24 years, with assignments on land and sea, and deployments around the world as both an enlisted sailor and an officer. Fresh out of the military, Hicks now is navigating a sea of a different sort: the civilian job market. And that has meant translating the military jobs she once held, such as "damage controlman," into titles such as "shipboard firefighter," that private employers can more readily understand. Today's job market is challenging, but particularly so for veterans whose experience isn't always clear to the companies that might hire them, Hicks said.
NEWS
By Rachel Cohen | March 29, 2013
This week, as the Supreme Court took up two historic cases pertaining to same-sex marriage, it's been an exciting time to be a college student. Huge numbers of young people on Facebook and Twitter continue to post pictures and status updates in support of marriage equality. Kids proudly walk around campus sporting red clothing in support of the Human Rights Campaign, a national organization that seeks to promote equal rights for gays, lesbians, transgender people and bisexuals. The enthusiasm, from the quad to the blogosphere, is infectious and inspiring.
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