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NEWS
September 8, 2012
Letter writer Mahlon G. Anderson of AAA Mid-Atlantic ("Md. should devote its surplus to transportation," Sept. 6) gives short shrift to an essential need here in Maryland - improved public transportation. He focuses on road construction and motorists. Another effective way to for Maryland "to tackle its own Beltway gridlock" is to develop the public transportation alternative to automobile commuting both in the Baltimore and the National Capital regions. In fact, the Nov. 1, 2011 Final Report of the Blue Ribbon Commission on Maryland Transportation Funding, of which Mr. Anderson was a member, refers to "capital needs to address doubling transit ridership goal" as an historic and important use of additional funds to the Transportation Trust Fund.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
More than two dozen West Baltimore homeowners are suing the state of Maryland to block the planned Red Line transit project from tunneling beneath their block, contending that they were inappropriately left out of the planning process. They seek more than $22 million in damages for lost property value and emotional distress. "Right now, they've lost so much of the value of their homes," said Lewyn Scott Garrett, one of three attorneys representing the 25 homeowners in the 300 block of N. Fremont Ave. in the city's Poppleton neighborhood.
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NEWS
August 21, 2013
As an American merchant sailor, I came to Baltimore for a week of training and was very pleased to find the Baltimore public transit system an efficient alternative to renting a car. The buses and light rail vehicles are clean and the drivers do not tolerate rude behavior. And the all-day pass made worrying about exact change irrelevant. At several different light rail stops I was the only passenger waiting on the platform. But my feelings of anxiety were quickly fixed as the MTA police came through on their patrols.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | September 7, 2014
So, first question: If you could travel to the nation's capital from Baltimore in 15 minutes by super-fast train, would you? Sure you would. You'd give it a try at least once, if only to brag that you had achieved land speed of 300 mph. It would be a bucket list kind of thing. But would you go to the District of Columbia more often if you could get there in 15 minutes? I mean, really: Would having a high-speed train between Baltimore and Washington make you more interested in things D.C. - the Hirshhorn, the Nationals, protests in Lafayette Square, decriminalized pot?
NEWS
October 11, 2013
I am writing in response to the editorial, "Charm City Express" (Sept. 16), outlining Gov. Martin O'Malley's plan to increase support for Baltimore's public transportation infrastructure. As a student at Johns Hopkins University coming from New York City, the model of efficient and effective public transportation, I am thrilled with Governor O'Malley's plan. When talking to my peers at Hopkins, everyone agrees that Baltimore is a fantastic city with a lot to explore, but we are frustrated by the lack of a good transit system for us to explore it. Most students don't have a car on campus.
NEWS
February 5, 2012
I read with interest the commentary by Gregory Spencer Jr. ("Connect the lines," Feb. 2) on the need for a transportation hub in Baltimore. There is no question that the convergence of the Red Line, the existing light rail transit (LRT) line and the Charm City Circulator will provide a new day for transportation for Baltimore. Transit and auto transportation is expensive, and as a region we need to continue to support every piece of transit that is affordable. It appears that there is the likelihood of some form of gas tax increase which will add to the cost of commuting.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | June 6, 2012
Did you watch the transit of Venus last night? Clouds threatened, but it sounds like they cleared in time for most to see the transit. Check out the photos above and to the left to see how others saw it. Or if you have your own to share, upload them here . Was it all you thought it would (or wouldn't) be? E-mail me at sdance@baltsun.com or tweet to @MdWeather with your reaction. Read more about the transit in my  story from Sunday's paper : When Venus passed between Earth and the sun 251 years ago Tuesday, scientists scribbled downobservations that helped calculate a rough estimate of the size of our solar system.
NEWS
January 10, 2013
I think is interesting that Thursday's editorial, "Growing Baltimore" (Jan. 3), included two paragraphs about how walkability and quality transit have helped to spark growth in Washington, D.C., but only a short sentence about the Charm City Circulator when discussing Baltimore. I commend The Sun for getting it right about D.C. But that begs the question: If quality transit has been so important to the revival to the city 40 miles to the south, why isn't it important to Baltimore's future?
NEWS
January 4, 2004
ONE OF THE nation's largest transit-oriented developments is taking shape along Baltimore's Howard Street, at the confluence of this region's transit lines. And at the Owings Mills Metro stop, the state plans to invest $14 million in a parking garage as part of a 46-acre mixed-use, transit-oriented project. So it's somewhat surprising that the state Department of Transportation only now is aggressively seeking bids from developers interested in building on state land at 10 MARC, bus and subway stops.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | April 30, 2012
A twice-in-a-lifetime celestial event is coming up in June, and on Tuesday, the Space Telescope Science Institute is providing a chance to learn more about it ahead of time. A monthly public lecture will focus on the transit of Venus, in which the planet will pass directly in front of the sun. During a transit, planets can be seen as a small black dot moving across the face of the sun. Of course, as with eclipses and other solar phenomena, they should not be viewed directly. In North America, the transit will be visible at sunset June 5. Look for more coverage here as the event gets closer.
NEWS
August 29, 2014
As the Red Line's cost escalates yet again to near $3 billion, how much longer can the MTA keep saying these increases are "unexpected" ( "City, county agree to help pay for Red Line as cost rises to $2.9 billion," Aug. 26)? The Red Line started in 2002 as part of a three-project transit plan with a combined cost of $2.5 billion to be completed by 2014. By 2008, plans for the two other projects were dropped and the Red Line became an isolated system, unconnected to any other transit line at a projected cost of $1.6 billion.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
Carvey G. Davis Jr., a former Baltimore Transit Co. motorman who never lost his affection for streetcars and was a longtime supporter and benefactor of the Baltimore Streetcar Museum, died of bone cancer Saturday at his Glen Burnie home. He was 90. "Some of Carvey's fondest memories were running and riding streetcars," said John O'Neill, longtime Baltimore Streetcar Museum president, who lives in Jarrettsville. "He was the ultimate rail fan and the last link for all of us to the great era of Baltimore streetcars," said Martin K. Van Horn, a Pennsylvania Railroad historian and streetcar museum member.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2014
Artist Pablo Machioli hangs out in the belly of the letter "B. " Kyle Miller likes to linger in "U," a letter he helped shape from steel and pine. And bus driver Kaliha Taylor waits for her shift to begin while perched on the lower curve of "S. " Baltimore's most distinctive bus stop was unveiled late last month on the side of the Creative Alliance in Highlandtown. The trio of giant letters - which resemble a set piece from "Sesame Street" - has become a favorite spot for residents to lounge or pose for photos.
NEWS
July 28, 2014
As a city homeowner and transit user, I am extremely pleased to see that Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake is fighting to secure the Red Line ("Mayor reaffirms city's support for Red Line," July 24). If Baltimore is to be competitive in the years ahead, it needs a greatly improved transit network, particularly at a time when so many Americans are choosing to invest in walkable urban communities with strong public transportation options. The Red Line is as integral to attracting 10,000 new families as part of the mayor's continuing efforts to reduce property taxes and improve the overall fiscal health of the city, as evidenced by our recently improved bond rating.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2014
In a reversal of state healthcare policy, transgender state employees in Maryland can now access gender reassignment surgery, hormone therapy and other transition-related care under their state-provided health insurance plans. The change quietly went into effect at the start of this month as the result of legal negotiations in a discrimination case brought against the state by Sailor Holobaugh, a 31-year-old clinical research assistant in neurology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore.
NEWS
July 14, 2014
State education officials told us that scores on this year's Maryland School Assessment exams would go down, and that they most certainly did. Schools state-wide embarked last fall on their first full year of instruction tied to the Common Core standards, but the tests this spring were still tied to the old curriculum. The mismatch was such an obvious issue that many, from parents to some candidates for governor, advocated skipping the tests altogether on the grounds that they would be a waste of time and money.
NEWS
December 5, 2002
LIKE MILLIONS before him, Rob Vallese three years ago made the big move to a spacious new suburban home. But he did it by going against the last half-century's tide - by moving closer to the city, shortening his work commute and garaging his beloved car. Mr. Vallese, a Montgomery County pension manager, moved from a Germantown townhouse to a luxury home in King Farm, a large mixed-use development rising in Rockville, about 10 miles closer to his downtown...
NEWS
December 29, 2005
A 9-year-old boy with learning disabilities enrolled in a special school. A 57-year-old man with a kidney dialysis appointment. A 35-year-old disabled woman headed to work. These are typical people helped each day by the Maryland Transit Administration's Mobility paratransit service. For them, Mobility's fleet of shuttles and sedans is literally a lifeline, a way to get to school and to jobs, the means to an independent life and to receive vital health care. Yet for many years, Mobility service has been nothing short of miserable.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2014
Like many Maryland graduates, Stan Gelbaugh wasn't thrilled when the school announced nearly 20 months ago that it was going to be moving from the Atlantic Coast Conference to the Big Ten. The former Terps quarterback, who was a part of three straight ACC championship football teams from 1983 through 1985, also knew he had little choice but to accept the decision. Even Monday, as he joined a couple of hundred alums, administrators and fans at the Under Armour Brand House in Harbor East to celebrate Maryland officially joining the Big Ten on Tuesday, Gelbaugh seemed to be more resigned to the change than rejoicing about it. "I think it's going to happen," Gelbaugh said hesitantly, when asked for his feelings about the move.
SPORTS
By Andrew Bahl and Paul Pierre-Louis, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2014
As Maryland leaves the Atlantic Coast Conference for the Big Ten, the Terps will be looking at an entirely new set of competitors in each of their intercollegiate sports. With the transition becoming official Tuesday, here's a glance at each of Maryland's athletic programs, with recaps of their final year in the ACC and a look forward to what they'll face in the Big Ten. Baseball Record: 40-23 (15-14 ACC) Finish: 2nd in Atlantic Division Recap: Second-year coach John Szefc led the baseball team to its best postseason run in program history.
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