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Transfer Tax

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NEWS
April 5, 1993
The Harford County Council should choose the correct, though more difficult, course tomorrow and turn down the proposed 1 percent transfer tax on real estate sales.The tax is earmarked for building new schools and preserving the county's vanishing farmland, two programs that we strongly support. Harford's neighbor counties already have such a property transfer tax, so it would seem harmless enough.The problem is that the cost of these countywide amenities should be paid for by all Harford citizens, not just by those who buy or sell property.
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NEWS
March 9, 2014
When it comes to preserving land and creating public parks, few government programs have succeeded like Maryland's Program Open Space. It has been one of the state's most effective weapons in the cause of protecting the environment and off-setting the worst effects of poorly-managed sprawl development in the cities, suburbs and rural areas. The elegance of the program is in the simplicity of its design. By law, a .5 percent share of the transfer tax paid at real estate closings is set aside for protection of land against future development.
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NEWS
By Michael K. Burns and Michael K. Burns,Staff writer | April 12, 1992
Harford County's revenue would grow by an estimated $4 million a year as a result of a 1 percent county real estate transfer tax the County Council will consider.During its final week, the General Assembly gave the county the authority to enact the tax.The measure must be signed by the governor and adopted by the County Council before taking effect.Half of the revenue would be used to purchase farmland development rights, and the other half to finance the acquisition and construction of school sites, County Executive Eileen M. Rehrmann said.
NEWS
By Phillip McGowan and Phillip McGowan,sun reporter | March 30, 2008
Years before he became Anne Arundel County's chief executive, John R. Leopold sounded a lot like the critics of his current plan to impose perhaps the highest development impact fees in Maryland. In 2001, Leopold attacked county leaders' idea of raising those fees "during our current recessionary slump." He argued that it could hurt commercial growth, dampen the prospect of affordably priced housing and unfairly burden selective homeowners. "They are insidious, regressive homeowner taxes," Leopold, then a member of the House of Delegates, wrote in a letter to the Maryland Gazette.
BUSINESS
December 12, 1999
Dear Mr. Azrael:If the price of a home is $74,900, what would be the settlement cost and how do you determine the amount of transfer fees?Connie Monteclaro, PikesvilleDear Ms. Monteclaro:Each county charges a transfer tax when a deed to real estate is recorded. The rate of tax varies by county, ranging from 0.2 percent to 1.6 percent of the purchase price.For example, Baltimore City charges a 1.5 percent transfer tax. The transfer tax rate in Baltimore County is 1.6 percent.Each county also charges a recordation tax on the recording of a deed transferring real property.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | February 20, 2003
Acrimony over a proposal to fund $215 million in school construction with an increase in the county's real estate transfer tax rose to the surface in Annapolis yesterday, as members of the county's legislative delegation again postponed a final vote on the plan. House delegation chairman Del. Frank S. Turner, a Democrat who supports the proposal, first asked the county state senators, who oppose the tax increase, if they have a better plan. "In the letters I get, people don't want higher income tax or property tax," he said.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | November 4, 2004
The Carroll County commissioners unveiled a legislative agenda this week that would increase revenue without further taxing property owners. They also will ask the state delegation to help them provide tax relief to senior citizens. The commissioners will again ask the legislative delegation for the authority to impose a transfer tax on real estate transactions, a proposal that could add at least $7.5 million in revenue annually. In addition, they are proposing a 5 percent hotel tax that could generate about $250,000 a year.
NEWS
By Sherrie Ruhl and Sherrie Ruhl,Staff Writer | April 4, 1993
The fate of Harford's proposed real estate transfer tax appears uncertain, with lawmakers divided over the measure that supporters tout as a savior for dwindling farmland and a source of desperately needed money for school construction.The seven-member County Council must vote on the transfer tax, proposed in 1992 by County Executive Eileen M. Rehrmann, at its meeting Tuesday night, or the legislation will die. The council also is expected to vote on a land-preservation plan -- but the plan depends on money from the transfer tax to pay farm owners who agree not to let their land be developed.
NEWS
December 26, 1995
ALTHOUGH NO SCIENTIFIC polling has been conducted, samples of public sentiment seem to be running against the commissioners' proposal to finance farmland preservation through a 1 percent transfer tax on real estate sales. The proposal, which has considerable merit, may die a premature and unnecessary death.The county commissioners proposed this transfer tax as an essential tool in continuing Carroll's successful farmland preservation program. In recent years, the lack of a reliable source of revenue has hampered this program.
NEWS
By Phyllis Brill and Phyllis Brill,Staff Writer | March 7, 1993
Nobody disputes the need to save Harford's dwindling farmland, but some residents say a tax on real estate transfers isn't the answer.As more than 100 people turned out last week for a hearing on the tax, which would raise money for agricultural preservation and school construction, Realtors and homebuilders led the opposition."
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Reporter | March 2, 2008
Harford County has spent more than $20 million on land preservation this year, bringing to about 43,000 the number of acres in permanent protection programs, but the purchases have nearly exhausted all the funding reserves available to safeguard farms from development. If the county is to reach its goal of 55,000 acres preserved by 2012, officials say they must find alternative means, possibly a free market approach such as Transfer of Development Rights, or TDR, to continue protecting land.
NEWS
February 23, 2008
Don't allow housing to fill tract in county I feel for the residents of the Hampton area ("Hampton residents fight development," Feb. 18). As a long-term resident of the Greenspring Valley, I have been involved in many battles with nonprofits groups like the Towson United Methodist Church - the group that is, in this instance, seeking to sell and rezone land for more dense use. These nonprofits (often schools) have benefited from tax breaks over the years and often got their original land free of charge or at a low price.
NEWS
By Phillip McGowan and Phillip McGowan,sun reporter | February 10, 2008
Anne Arundel County's state lawmakers will not consider a County Council request to raise the transfer-tax rate, effectively killing a proposal that could have generated $25 million a year for school construction and stream restoration, the chairwoman of the county's House delegation has confirmed. Mary Ann Love, a Democrat who leads the Anne Arundel delegates, said Thursday that the county's Senate delegation was not going to vote on the council's resolution seeking state authority to raise the transfer tax from 1 percent to as much as 1.5 percent.
NEWS
By Phillip McGowan and Phillip McGowan,sun reporter | February 6, 2008
The Anne Arundel County Council has offered a counterproposal to a massive set of increases to impact fees on new development proposed by County Executive John R. Leopold: raise the transfer tax rate to generate millions of dollars toward school construction and maintenance and reversing the effects of storm-water runoff. On Monday, the Republican-majority council unanimously agreed to support a resolution that seeks state-enabling legislation to raise the transfer tax on property sales from 1 percent to as high as 1.5 percent.
BUSINESS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,Sun reporter | November 7, 2007
As the Maryland General Assembly considered closing a loophole to prevent corporations from entirely avoiding state taxes, Marriott International Inc. warned legislators yesterday that it might "adjust operations" if they alter the tax system. While the Bethesda-based hotel operator insists that it pays taxes and stopped short of saying that it would move, business and economic development leaders are worried that fewer companies are choosing to call Maryland home. A dozen major Maryland companies have been bought out this year, often becoming branches of companies with headquarters elsewhere.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Reporter | July 15, 2007
Harford's property owners will receive some minor tax relief next year, when a newly enacted credit takes effect. The Harford County Council lowered the 10 percent cap on the Homestead Tax Credit by 1 percentage point starting July 2008. The council expects to take the cap down to 8 percent by 2011. With the average property assessment rising at least 40 percent every three years, the Homestead Property Tax Credit caps the amount of property tax an owner-occupant must pay by limiting the annual increase in taxable assessments.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | November 16, 2004
For the third consecutive year, the Carroll County commissioners have asked the county's Annapolis delegation to enact legislation that would allow the county to collect a tax on real estate transactions. Such a transfer tax would raise about $7.5 million a year, permitting the county to borrow as much as $75 million for building projects such as road improvements, upgrades to police and fire services, and school construction and renovation. The county would assess the tax, which would be in addition to the half-percent transfer tax the state charges, at the time a property sale is settled.
NEWS
By Phillip McGowan and Phillip McGowan,sun reporter | February 6, 2008
The Anne Arundel County Council has offered a counterproposal to a massive set of increases to impact fees on new development proposed by County Executive John R. Leopold: raise the transfer tax rate to generate millions of dollars toward school construction and maintenance and reversing the effects of storm-water runoff. On Monday, the Republican-majority council unanimously agreed to support a resolution that seeks state-enabling legislation to raise the transfer tax on property sales from 1 percent to as high as 1.5 percent.
NEWS
June 17, 2007
Transfer tax would hurt young buyers In the June 6 edition of the Harford County section, Morita C. Bruce wrote that the county needs help in dealing with BRAC. I agree with the writer in that our infrastructure probably cannot handle the influx of personnel coming to our county - but I do not agree with the writer's solution of creating a transfer tax on the sale of existing homes. Evidently the writer has not purchased a home recently and dealt with the closing costs associated with the settlement of property.
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