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By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Staff Writer | February 5, 1993
Here's the deal:Some 2,400 masters of transcendental meditation fly into Baltimore, check into a hotel at the harbor and start to meditate, each morning and evening.Within weeks, muggers begin to lose the urge to mug. Months pass, and robbers forswear robbery. A year or two, and drug dealers are staying off the corners. Within five years, crime has been -- not reduced. Eliminated."With its cities free from crime," say newspaper advertisements for the American City Project, placed over the last four months in 60 urban centers, "the United States will radiate a powerful positive, harmonious, and nourishing influence for the whole world."
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NEWS
February 6, 2008
MAHARISHI MAHESH YOGI, 91 Introduced the Beatles to transcendental meditation The Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, a guru to the Beatles who introduced the West to transcendental meditation, died yesterday at his home in the Dutch town of Vlodrop, a spokesman said. "He died peacefully at about 7 p.m.," said Bob Roth, a spokesman for the Transcendental Meditation movement that the Maharishi founded. He said his death appeared to be due to "natural causes, his age." Once dismissed as hippie mysticism, the Hindu practice of mind control that the Maharishi taught, called transcendental meditation, gradually gained medical respectability.
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NEWS
February 6, 2008
MAHARISHI MAHESH YOGI, 91 Introduced the Beatles to transcendental meditation The Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, a guru to the Beatles who introduced the West to transcendental meditation, died yesterday at his home in the Dutch town of Vlodrop, a spokesman said. "He died peacefully at about 7 p.m.," said Bob Roth, a spokesman for the Transcendental Meditation movement that the Maharishi founded. He said his death appeared to be due to "natural causes, his age." Once dismissed as hippie mysticism, the Hindu practice of mind control that the Maharishi taught, called transcendental meditation, gradually gained medical respectability.
NEWS
By Sam Quinones and Sam Quinones,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 6, 1997
CIUDAD VICTORIA, Mexico -- To the people of the Mexican state of Tamaulipas, it's unclear whether their governor's views on air conditioning are the cause or a symptom of what they sometimes refer to as his "esoterismo."Tamaulipas borders Texas from Laredo to the Gulf of Mexico, then stretches south into the Tropic of Cancer. In such a sweltering region, air cooling, to those who can afford it, would seem a necessity. But Manuel Cavazos Lerma will not cool his office -- though it is said that the stables where he keeps his thoroughbred horses are air-conditioned.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Staff writer | March 13, 1991
Can Howard County lower its crime rate through transcendental meditation?It may sound like magic, says financial analyst Kevin P. Condon, but statistics show that transcendental meditation can have a beneficial effect on communities -- and he wants Howard countians to give it a shot."
FEATURES
By Henry Scarupa | May 29, 1991
Murder and other violent crimes are getting out of hand -- and local followers of the Maharishi Mahesh Yogi intend to put a stop to them.How do they propose to fight crime? Through twice-daily, 20-minute group practices of Transcendental Meditation (TM). If enough people in an area meditate together, they believe, they can change the social and economic climate.This is called the "Maharishi effect," and followers of the Maharishi have recently launched such a program at a center in Pikesville and a dozen or so TM centers in the greater Washington area.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | November 1, 1992
ELLICOTT CITY -- Posted on Kevin Condon's well-manicured and landscaped lawn is a colorful campaign sign supporting the national candidates of the Natural Law Party of the United States of America.Except for a handmade "Vote for Perot" sign posted on mailbox a few doors down, Mr. Condon's poster is the only visible political advertisement in this neighborhood of tree-lined streets and colonial and ranch-style houses.The sign also is the only visible clue to Mr. Condon's candidacy.The self-employed investment manager is running as a write-in candidate for the 6th Congressional District, competing against Republican Roscoe Bartlett and Democrat Thomas Hattery, who have run a highly visible and frequently negative campaign for the seat now held by Beverly D. Byron.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Evening Sun Staff | November 27, 1990
NANCY LONSDORF is a physician who believes traditional Western medicine puts too much stress on being ill, and too little on how to stay well. Maharishi Ayurveda, a traditional form of holistic health care that is 5,000 years old, works differently, she says.Lonsdorf, a 1983 graduate of the Johns Hopkins Medical School who received postgraduate training as a psychiatrist at Stanford University, is director of the Maharishi Ayur-Veda Medical Center in Washington.There, her education in Western medicine takes a back seat to methods such as pulse diagnosis, herbal treatments, transcendental meditation, and a system of treatment based on body types or doshas called vata, pitta and kapha.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,Sun Staff Writer | August 21, 1994
LiteTrends, a $6.6 million company, is the kind of business that Carroll officials want more of.The high-tech company, which moved to the county three years ago, produces no harmful waste, uses skilled labor and -- if it can find $2 million in private backing -- has potential for growth.With four full-time employees, the company turns tofu into seasoned meat substitute that owners Ed Walker and Andrew J. Wilks hope will become a staple of college dining halls and corporate cafeterias.The company's 6,000-square-foot operation on Progress Way in Eldersburg combines New Age and high tech, reflecting its owners' interests.
NEWS
By Sam Quinones and Sam Quinones,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 6, 1997
CIUDAD VICTORIA, Mexico -- To the people of the Mexican state of Tamaulipas, it's unclear whether their governor's views on air conditioning are the cause or a symptom of what they sometimes refer to as his "esoterismo."Tamaulipas borders Texas from Laredo to the Gulf of Mexico, then stretches south into the Tropic of Cancer. In such a sweltering region, air cooling, to those who can afford it, would seem a necessity. But Manuel Cavazos Lerma will not cool his office -- though it is said that the stables where he keeps his thoroughbred horses are air-conditioned.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,Sun Staff Writer | August 21, 1994
LiteTrends, a $6.6 million company, is the kind of business that Carroll officials want more of.The high-tech company, which moved to the county three years ago, produces no harmful waste, uses skilled labor and -- if it can find $2 million in private backing -- has potential for growth.With four full-time employees, the company turns tofu into seasoned meat substitute that owners Ed Walker and Andrew J. Wilks hope will become a staple of college dining halls and corporate cafeterias.The company's 6,000-square-foot operation on Progress Way in Eldersburg combines New Age and high tech, reflecting its owners' interests.
FEATURES
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Staff Writer | February 5, 1993
Here's the deal:Some 2,400 masters of transcendental meditation fly into Baltimore, check into a hotel at the harbor and start to meditate, each morning and evening.Within weeks, muggers begin to lose the urge to mug. Months pass, and robbers forswear robbery. A year or two, and drug dealers are staying off the corners. Within five years, crime has been -- not reduced. Eliminated."With its cities free from crime," say newspaper advertisements for the American City Project, placed over the last four months in 60 urban centers, "the United States will radiate a powerful positive, harmonious, and nourishing influence for the whole world."
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | November 1, 1992
ELLICOTT CITY -- Posted on Kevin Condon's well-manicured and landscaped lawn is a colorful campaign sign supporting the national candidates of the Natural Law Party of the United States of America.Except for a handmade "Vote for Perot" sign posted on mailbox a few doors down, Mr. Condon's poster is the only visible political advertisement in this neighborhood of tree-lined streets and colonial and ranch-style houses.The sign also is the only visible clue to Mr. Condon's candidacy.The self-employed investment manager is running as a write-in candidate for the 6th Congressional District, competing against Republican Roscoe Bartlett and Democrat Thomas Hattery, who have run a highly visible and frequently negative campaign for the seat now held by Beverly D. Byron.
FEATURES
By Henry Scarupa | May 29, 1991
Murder and other violent crimes are getting out of hand -- and local followers of the Maharishi Mahesh Yogi intend to put a stop to them.How do they propose to fight crime? Through twice-daily, 20-minute group practices of Transcendental Meditation (TM). If enough people in an area meditate together, they believe, they can change the social and economic climate.This is called the "Maharishi effect," and followers of the Maharishi have recently launched such a program at a center in Pikesville and a dozen or so TM centers in the greater Washington area.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Staff writer | March 13, 1991
Can Howard County lower its crime rate through transcendental meditation?It may sound like magic, says financial analyst Kevin P. Condon, but statistics show that transcendental meditation can have a beneficial effect on communities -- and he wants Howard countians to give it a shot."
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Evening Sun Staff | November 27, 1990
NANCY LONSDORF is a physician who believes traditional Western medicine puts too much stress on being ill, and too little on how to stay well. Maharishi Ayurveda, a traditional form of holistic health care that is 5,000 years old, works differently, she says.Lonsdorf, a 1983 graduate of the Johns Hopkins Medical School who received postgraduate training as a psychiatrist at Stanford University, is director of the Maharishi Ayur-Veda Medical Center in Washington.There, her education in Western medicine takes a back seat to methods such as pulse diagnosis, herbal treatments, transcendental meditation, and a system of treatment based on body types or doshas called vata, pitta and kapha.
NEWS
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 13, 2005
I was in the hospital for knee surgery and got a terrible rash on my back. The nurses said it was probably from chemicals used to launder the sheets. Is this true? It could be. These rashes happen "with enough frequency that we do see it. They're often due to the high amounts of bleach and whitening agents in the detergent" used in hospital laundering, said Dr. John Williams, a dermatologist at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. Commercial laundries use much harsher chemicals than people use at home, he said, and these agents can cause contact dermatitis, a rash that in most cases is simply a reaction to an irritating substance but 20 percent of the time is a genuine allergic reaction, in which immune cells gear up to fight the offending substance.
NEWS
November 9, 2006
Born 19th March 1951 in New York City, NY to Sally H. Cochran of Charlottesville, VA and Oliver H. Fulton of Gibson Island, MD passed away at 4AM on the 5th Nov 2006. She graduated Magna Cum Laude from Wells College in Aurora, NY - Phi Beta Kappa - majoring in English Literature with a minor in French, spending a year in the Sorbonne in Paris. Laura spent her life dedicated to a spiritual path enjoying the last 8 years on Heavenly Mountain near Boone, NC. She was a lifelong teacher of the Transcendental Meditation Program.
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