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NEWS
November 29, 2013
Regarding your report "FDA trans-fat ban threatens Berger cookies" (Nov. 22), dietitian Angela Ginn said it best: "It may be tantalizing to our taste buds, but once it gets into our arteries it turns to sludge. " Bakery owner Charles DeBaufre Jr. has made a ton of money selling Berger cookies. He should have been ahead of the game and gotten rid of the trans-fat in his product. I stopped buying anything with trans-fats in it 10 years ago - including his cookies - and I am sure there are many others like me. Katie, Baltimore - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
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ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2014
There's nothing different about your Berger cookie. It's just the nutritional label that's changed. A sharp-eyed shopper wrote in to tell us that he had tried the Berger cookie that has 0 grams of trans fat, and that it tasted just as good as the 1-gram fudge-topped classic that's been produced and enjoyed in Baltimore for generations. We went out and bought a pack of trans-fat-free Berger and we also couldn't see or taste anything different about the new Berger cookie.  That's because there is no difference.
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HEALTH
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2013
After buying Fractured Prune Doughnuts in January, Dan Brinton switched to an oil without trans fats to fry the chain's hand-dipped glazed doughnuts. "It's a little more expensive, but it's certainly worth it as far as I'm concerned," said Brinton, CEO of the growing Ocean City -based chain, on Thursday. Earlier in the day, the Food and Drug Administration moved to virtually eliminate trans fat, an artificially created artery-clogging substance, from Americans' diets. The move follows a massive effort by food makers and restaurant chains to remove the substance over the past decade, as consumers become more educated about risks and vote for healthier alternatives with their wallets.
NEWS
By John McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | December 28, 2013
H.L. Mencken published his occasional essays under the heading "Prejudices," his avowed and oft-repeated intention to "stir up the animals. " In my own little way, I have tried to honor his example at this blog, realizing, of course, that every time I succumb to the liberal afflatus, or castigate believers for their ham-handed attempts to smuggle Genesis into biology class, that I risk alienating readers and watching my follower count at...
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2013
If the Food and Drug Administration goes ahead with its proposal to eliminate trans fats from processed food, it could create a sticky situation for Baltimore-area sweets makers, including the company that produces famed Berger cookies. The FDA will announce a final decision on banning trans fats from restaurants and packaged products on Jan. 7, but manufacturers are already preparing themselves. The baker of the Berger cookies has tasted the future and found it lacking.
HEALTH
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | October 27, 2010
A Lexington Market carry-out has been fined for alleged violations of Baltimore's curb on the use of trans fats by local food facilities. The Healthy Choice store, at 400 W. Lexington St., received a $100 environmental citation, the first enforcement action since the ban took effect in September 2009. Health Department inspectors in July found the store using margarine containing 3 grams of trans fat per serving, according to Juan Gutierrez, assistant commissioner for environmental health.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,Sun reporter | September 2, 2007
Golden hot oil burbles in generous vats at dozens of food stands throughout the Maryland State Fair. Sweet and heavy, greasy and cloying, the midway wears the perfume of fried everything, its signature scent. Fried dough, fried candy bars, fried Twinkies. Fried fudge, fried mushrooms, fried onion blooms. Fried Oreos, fried peanut butter and jelly sandwiches, fried chicken nuggets. At state fairs nationwide, pushing the limits of what to batter and oil is considered a test of heartland ingenuity, like raising prizewinning livestock or growing a record-breaking gourd.
NEWS
By Ruma Kumar and Ruma Kumar,[Sun Reporter] | March 9, 2007
Senators heard testimony yesterday on two bills aimed at reducing the use of unhealthful fats such as margarine, shortening and partially hydrogenated oils. The first bill would ban food with trans fats from being served in all food facilities across the state, including restaurants, school cafeterias, and churches and community centers that regularly serve food. The second bill would prohibit the serving of foods with trans fats in public buildings, such as cafeterias in state government buildings and public school lunchrooms.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,Sun reporter | March 11, 2008
A bill aimed at reducing the risk of heart disease among Baltimore residents was unanimously approved by the City Council yesterday, action that almost guarantees final passage of a ban on trans fats in restaurant food at a final reading Monday. "This will help to protect our children's health," said Councilwoman Agnes Welch, a sponsor of the bill who has promoted it as part of a larger effort to reduce childhood obesity. The bill needs Mayor Sheila Dixon's signature to become law. A spokesman for Dixon, who is known to follow an intense fitness regimen, said she backs the ban. Baltimore follows in the footsteps of Philadelphia, New York City and Montgomery County in trying to remove trans fats from restaurant menus.
NEWS
By Eileen Ambrose and Eileen Ambrose,eileen.ambrose@baltsun.com | September 21, 2009
If you crave shortening in your pie crust or french fries seeped in "partially hydrogenated vegetable oil," you'll have to dine outside Baltimore. As of Sunday, Baltimore restaurants, delis, bakeries and corner lunch carts can no longer prepare food that contains 0.5 grams or more of unhealthful trans fats per serving. The city joined a growing number of places, including Montgomery County, New York City, Philadelphia, Boston and California, to ban trans fats that health advocates say clog arteries and lead to heart disease.
NEWS
By Joel Brinkley | December 25, 2013
What's so wrong with palm oil, from the palm trees that bear fruit, not coconuts? Well, if you listen to environmentalists and animal-rights advocates along with nutrition and health experts, they'll tell you it's something close to poison. Once the United States and other Western countries began condemning and banning trans-fat oils a few years ago, palm oil became a popular substitute. You can find it in shampoo, lipstick, soap and a host of snack and other foods, including some ketchups, margarine, chewing gum, candy bars and cooking oil. Oil-palm trees, as they're called, are grown primarily in Indonesia and Malaysia, and that's where the problems begin.
NEWS
November 29, 2013
Regarding your report "FDA trans-fat ban threatens Berger cookies" (Nov. 22), dietitian Angela Ginn said it best: "It may be tantalizing to our taste buds, but once it gets into our arteries it turns to sludge. " Bakery owner Charles DeBaufre Jr. has made a ton of money selling Berger cookies. He should have been ahead of the game and gotten rid of the trans-fat in his product. I stopped buying anything with trans-fats in it 10 years ago - including his cookies - and I am sure there are many others like me. Katie, Baltimore - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2013
If the Food and Drug Administration goes ahead with its proposal to eliminate trans fats from processed food, it could create a sticky situation for Baltimore-area sweets makers, including the company that produces famed Berger cookies. The FDA will announce a final decision on banning trans fats from restaurants and packaged products on Jan. 7, but manufacturers are already preparing themselves. The baker of the Berger cookies has tasted the future and found it lacking.
HEALTH
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2013
After buying Fractured Prune Doughnuts in January, Dan Brinton switched to an oil without trans fats to fry the chain's hand-dipped glazed doughnuts. "It's a little more expensive, but it's certainly worth it as far as I'm concerned," said Brinton, CEO of the growing Ocean City -based chain, on Thursday. Earlier in the day, the Food and Drug Administration moved to virtually eliminate trans fat, an artificially created artery-clogging substance, from Americans' diets. The move follows a massive effort by food makers and restaurant chains to remove the substance over the past decade, as consumers become more educated about risks and vote for healthier alternatives with their wallets.
EXPLORE
February 7, 2012
Jason's Deli 8874 McGaw Road Columbia 410-309-5980 www.jasonsdeli.com The healthy menu consists of sandwiches, subs, salads and pasta dishes made with no high-fructose corn syrup, trans fats or MSG. There's a gluten-free menu, too. “Our variety really sets us apart,” says general manager Jay McClurkin.
HEALTH
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | October 27, 2010
A Lexington Market carry-out has been fined for alleged violations of Baltimore's curb on the use of trans fats by local food facilities. The Healthy Choice store, at 400 W. Lexington St., received a $100 environmental citation, the first enforcement action since the ban took effect in September 2009. Health Department inspectors in July found the store using margarine containing 3 grams of trans fat per serving, according to Juan Gutierrez, assistant commissioner for environmental health.
NEWS
By Ellen Barry and Ellen Barry,Los Angeles Times | December 6, 2006
NEW YORK -- The New York City Board of Health voted unanimously yesterday to prohibit restaurateurs from cooking with artificial trans fats, setting a precedent for public health agencies eager to take on unhealthful eating. The city's 24,000 restaurants have six months to stop frying foods in oils that contain high levels of trans fats, which are believed to be a leading cause of heart disease.
NEWS
By John Fritze and John Fritze,Sun reporter | January 26, 2008
A Baltimore City councilwoman plans to introduce legislation next week to ban trans fats in restaurants, a controversial proposal that supporters argue would reduce the incidence of heart disease. The bill, sponsored by city Councilwoman Agnes Welch, follows trans fat bans enacted in Philadelphia, New York and Montgomery County and is likely to spark debate here between health advocates and restaurateurs. Any product containing partially hydrogenated vegetable oil - such as shortening or margarine - would be prohibited by the legislation.
NEWS
September 23, 2009
A new law in Baltimore City prohibiting trans fats in restaurants and other eateries took effect on Sunday. Do you support the ban? Yes 50% No 46% Not sure 4% (1,116 votes, results not scientific) Next poll: : Should the Baltimore city school system automatically and permanently expel any student found to be involved in setting a fire? Vote at baltimoresun.com/vote
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