Advertisement
HomeCollectionsTraining Programs
IN THE NEWS

Training Programs

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2012
A parade of Baltimore police officers, from rookies to a 30-year veteran, told City Council members Wednesday night that training programs developed by the department have sharpened their skills and helped build camaraderie among the ranks. But questioning about spending related to those programs was postponed as council members sought additional information from the agency. Pointing to recent police problems, such as a towing kickback scandal that is in court this week, City Councilman Brandon M. Scott called the hearing last month to question the effectiveness and costs of the training programs.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Robert P. Giloth and Maureen Conway | August 14, 2014
Last month's enactment of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), so long in the making, is a milestone. It makes important updates to our workforce training system and demonstrates national support for the expanded use of sector strategies that forge training partnerships between employers, nonprofits, foundations and public agencies. But WIOA is still just a first step in addressing the problem of connecting people to jobs. We need to build on it to establish a true and equitable apprenticeship system in the United States.
Advertisement
NEWS
December 10, 2002
Edward Rogowski, who oversaw training programs for the state Department of Human Resources, died of heart failure Saturday at Good Samaritan Hospital. The Towson resident was 84. Mr. Rogowski was born in Weirton, W.Va., the son of Polish immigrants, and moved to Poland with his parents as a child. He graduated from high school in Warsaw. He returned to Baltimore in 1939 and enlisted in the Army in 1941, serving with an infantry unit in the Pacific during World War II. After the war, Mr. Rogowski was employed as a draftsman at the former Glenn L. Martin Co. in Middle River before going to work for the Department of Human Resources in 1960 -- the year he earned his bachelor's degree in business administration from the Johns Hopkins University.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2014
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake has declined to fund a proposed East Baltimore job-training program backed by an influential community group, sparking a war of words over whether City Hall is doing enough to help the unemployed. The interfaith coalition Baltimoreans United in Leadership Development says its leaders have a proposal to provide 50 members of the Oliver neighborhood with jobs and want $594,000 in funding over three years from the Rawlings-Blake administration. The program would target ex-offenders and others chronically unemployed.
BUSINESS
By Ellen James Martin | May 27, 1991
In the 1990s, business leaders must become comfortable with cultural diversity in the workplace, says Paul Beatty, the newly appointed "executive in residence" at the University of Baltimore.In his new job, the 49-year-old Mr. Beatty is responsible for developing executive training programs in connection with the university. These will be among the first business "outreach" programs for the school and many will focus on workplace diversity, says Mr. Beatty, former head of human resources for Chase Bank of Maryland.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | September 3, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The Clinton administration doesn't have a job training policy; it has 154 of them.That's how many separate, competing, duplicative programs the government runs to help people find new careers.At least 65 job training programs serve poor Americans. Forty-five help youth. Six target American Indians. Others focus on ex-felons, displaced homemakers, refugees and runaways.It's a Herculean task to understand the options that are available, says Linda Morra, a General Accounting Office investigator.
BUSINESS
By Colleen Mastony and Colleen Mastony,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 5, 2003
CHICAGO - In an ambitious program said to be the first of its kind in the nation, a local agency is training suburban immigrants to become fair-housing advocates, able to identify discrimination and negotiate with local governments throughout the six-county Chicago area. The Leadership Council for Metropolitan Open Communities hopes immigrants will be capable of working independently of fair-housing organizations, which are overwhelmed by the large number of cases in far-flung suburban areas.
BUSINESS
By Michelle Singletary and Michelle Singletary,Evening Sun Staff | October 18, 1990
Athough the nation's employers spend about $30 billion a year on training, entry-level workers and those without a college degree often are not given the opportunity to participate in employer-based training programs."
NEWS
February 25, 1993
Howard to share $42 million for job trainingHoward County is one of 12 service delivery areas in the state slated to receive a share of $42 million from the Job Training Partnership Act. The money is to be used for employment training programs for economically disadvantaged youths and unskilled adults.The money is part of $56 million from the federal government to the state for employment and training programs, according to a statement released by the governor's office.The remaining $14 million is allocated for the Maryland Job Service, a broker that acts through the Maryland Department of Economic and Employment Development's local offices for employers and job seekers.
NEWS
April 4, 2005
THE STRIKING thing about the latest report on the quality of education colleges' training of school principals and administrators was not its verdict, that "the majority of these programs range from inadequate to appalling." That conclusion has not changed since at least 1987, when a national study found the same. Instead, the stunning thing was that three leading organizations of principals and administrators essentially agreed that "many programs simply do not teach what it takes to run a school or a school district."
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | October 10, 2013
Employer groups can begin applying next week for grants from a new state program aimed at increasing workforce training. Applications for Maryland's Employment Advancement Right Now program, known as EARN, are scheduled to go online at 2 p.m. Tuesday at dllr.maryland.gov. State labor officials hope businesses in industries that need more skilled workers will collaborate to decide what training is needed and how it could best be delivered. Maryland has $4.5 million for the program this fiscal year, split between planning grants and money to put training proposals in place.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2013
The voices are constant. They fight each other for space in your brain, and while you try to process what they're saying - "You're worthless, we hate you" - you can't believe what you're seeing: the TV weatherman talking directly to you. "You just gonna sit around with your stupid mouth open?" he says. The abuse goes on for six uncomfortable minutes before Candice Tyrell, a seven-year veteran of the Washington College campus police force, pulls away from the Mindstorm "psychosis simulator" and pronounces the whole thing "weird.
BUSINESS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2012
Since 1899, the Coast Guard's shipyard at Curtis Bay has added years to the life of the sea-battered fleet, repairing and upgrading hundreds of cutters before sending them back on patrol. So in 2002 when shipyard officials looked at the future and saw a graying workforce with an average age of 47, they crafted a rejuvenation plan based on nurturing home-grown talent. The trades training program they created has placed 125 students and graduates in the Curtis Bay workforce, which numbers 625. The apprentices receive not just trades training but college credits.
SPORTS
By Jay Dyer, Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 29, 2012
Bigger, faster, stronger might sound cliche, but this is the evolution of the sport of lacrosse. The result is that athletes are engaging in structured training programs in high school, with some athletes beginning in middle school. The goal of these programs is to enable athletes to improve their athletic skills (speed, agility, power, strength and coordination) while attempting to reduce injury risk. To maximize results, the athlete, strength and conditioning coach, and parents must be on the same page.
NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | February 16, 2012
WEATHER Today's forecast calls for rain with a high temperature near 52 degrees. It is expected to be cloudy tonight with a low temperature around 36 degrees. TRAFFIC Check our updates for this morning's issues as you plan your commute. FROM LAST NIGHT... O'Malley explains evolution of stance on same-sex marriage at Sun forum : Gov. Martin O'Malley gave his most detailed explanation to date for the evolution of his stance on gay marriage, at the inaugural Baltimore Sun Newsmaker Forum Wednesday evening.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2012
A parade of Baltimore police officers, from rookies to a 30-year veteran, told City Council members Wednesday night that training programs developed by the department have sharpened their skills and helped build camaraderie among the ranks. But questioning about spending related to those programs was postponed as council members sought additional information from the agency. Pointing to recent police problems, such as a towing kickback scandal that is in court this week, City Councilman Brandon M. Scott called the hearing last month to question the effectiveness and costs of the training programs.
BUSINESS
May 6, 1998
Shares of Baltimore-based Caliber Learning Network Inc., a money-losing, development-stage distributor of education and training programs for working adults, rose as much as 21 percent yesterday in their first day of trading.The company rose $2 to finish at $16 as 1.6 million shares changed hands on the Nasdaq stock market. Earlier, the stock touched $16.88. The company and selling shareholders sold 5.7 million shares, a 47 percent stake, at $14 each, raising $79.8 million. The sale gave Caliber a market capitalization of about $168.
NEWS
May 10, 1997
IT IS A sad fact of life in America's prisons that inmate disturbances happen from time to time. Too many angry men confined behind bars for years on end, with little to do. Add in a few vocal trouble-makers and the stage is set for violent outbreaks.Such was the case this week when trouble broke out at the Maryland House of Correction Annex -- where the state now keeps most of its maximum-security offenders. Any minor incident can be used as an excuse to start a ruckus. This time, it led to 16 injured officers and the use of tear gas and pepper spray by a beefed-up security force.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | February 4, 2012
Just north of the Johns Hopkins medical campus, in the Middle East section of East Baltimore — an area where hundreds of families were moved out and hundreds of homes were razed as part of a $1.8 billion urban renewal project — a new neighborhood is beginning to sprout. Under construction are $300 million worth of projects, including a state health laboratory, a 351-unit graduate student housing tower and a garage with a Walgreens drugstore, among other structures. Now plans are in the works for a mixed-income area with a state-of-the-art elementary school, a grocery store and restaurants, office buildings, and a park lined with loft-style apartments and a hotel.
EXPLORE
September 1, 2011
Amanda McMahon , of Baltimore, and Susan Getz , of Ellicott City, participated in a three-day training program at the Redken Exchange, held Aug. 14-18, in New York. The two learned new and innovative cutting and styling techniques, participating in more than 24-hours of advanced. They are both members of the Cavallaro team, located in the Columbia mall.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.