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By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,Sun Staff Writer | March 3, 1994
Female firefighter trainees will get shower stalls and a new restroom at the 36-year-old Baltimore Fire Academy on Pulaski Highway after the Board of Estimates approved a $50,000 expenditure yesterday.But the board didn't go far enough, said one of the three female firefighters in the Baltimore Fire Department."We need it in the firehouse, too," said Yvette Stanley, 33, who has been assigned to Engine Co. 21 on Roland Avenue for five years and showers only after battling a fire."You need separate [facilities]
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2013
Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. plans to announce today that it will pay $350,000 to a group of African-American job candidates to resolve hiring-diversity concerns raised by the federal government. A routine audit by the U.S. Department of Labor found substantially lower levels of African-American hires in two utility trainee job classifications than would be expected between December 2007 and November 2008, based on the pool of applicants, BGE said. BGE CEO Kenneth W. DeFontes Jr. said the audit did not find similar problems in the company's 229 other job categories.
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NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Evening Sun Staff | April 25, 1991
It all began, J. Randall Evans recalls, with the women who talked from behind their hands.Evans, Maryland's secretary of economic and employment development, was touring the state to meet people in Project Independence, a job training program for welfare recipients.At a stop in Hagerstown, Evans noticed that the women he met held their hands to their mouths and seldom smiled. "After a while, I had to ask: Why are these people mumbling in their hands?" he said.The women told him they were embarrassed by their teeth, decayed and wrecked by neglect.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2013
A Baltimore police trainee was injured Tuesday morning when a fragmented bullet struck his thigh during target-shooting practice. The incident occurred about 10:50 a.m. during a training exercise at a facility on the Maryland Army National Guard base in Glen Arm, Baltimore County, city police said. A bullet ricocheted off a metal target holder, causing the bullet to fragment, and a piece then hit the trainee in the upper thigh, according to police spokesman Sgt. Eric Kowalczyk.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 5, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Two women training at the FBI have complained that a firearms test that measures trigger-pulling strength has been used by the law enforcement agency to discriminate against women, a lawyer for one of them said yesterday.The other woman resigned yesterday after she had tried several times to pass a test in which new agents are required to pull the trigger of an unloaded handgun 29 times in 30 seconds.Agents who repeatedly fail the test are dropped from the FBI.Jessica Jurney, the trainee who resigned, said that at one point she pulled the trigger 27 times with her left hand and 25 times with her right hand.
NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF | November 4, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Officer trainee Malik A. Jenkins-Bey felt the unstable grate floor beneath him. He took in the grim steel-and-concrete decor, the punishing overhead lights and the elevators designed to evoke memories of gas ovens -- and felt uncomfortable, vulnerable.It was precisely what the soon-to-be-rookie Baltimore police officer had traveled to the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum to do: gain empathy with victims of the Holocaust of World War II and of police abuse anywhere."I can imagine how those people must have felt," Jenkins-Bey said.
NEWS
By Scott Wilson and Scott Wilson,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Tom Bowman contributed to this article | April 19, 1997
The presiding judge in the Aberdeen Proving Ground sexual misconduct case ruled yesterday that a soldier facing uninvited sex with a military superior does not have to say "no" -- only think it -- for the act to be called rape.The decision could turn the unfolding court-martial of Staff Sgt. Delmar G. Simpson into a landmark rape case. If military jurors agree, the decision would drastically tighten the rules governing sex between boss and subordinate in the American military and further complicate relationships between men and women in uniform.
NEWS
By NEWSDAY | November 2, 1999
At 2: 30 a.m. Sunday, the voice emanating by radio from the U.S. Coast Guard station at Woods Hole on Cape Cod said an EgyptAir Boeing 767 jet had gone down 60 nautical miles off Nantucket. On the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy training vessel, crew members realized it was clearly within range of their 224-foot ship."It was surreal," said Gilbert Cadena of Nederland, Texas, a senior at the academy. "We didn't expect this to turn into anything."The transmission set the 26-member crew into action, plunging the team of mariners in training into a real-life odyssey of international scope and monumental human tragedy.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | August 6, 1998
KENNEDYVILLE -- Pat Langenfelder got a preview yesterday morning of the environmental scrutiny that all large Maryland livestock farms might face in the near future.About 25 inspector trainees with the Environmental Protection Agency and environmental offices of surrounding states converged on her Kent County farm.They were looking for evidence of harmful byproducts from the manure streaming from the 2,400-hog operation. Those byproducts could seep into the waters of nearby Morgan Creek and eventually flow into the Chesapeake Bay.The inspector trainees looked at the mustard-green slime produced from the flow of hog manure from a breeding barn into a 1 1/2 -acre storage lagoon.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,candy.thomson@baltsun.com | June 29, 2009
Under their own power. That didn't seem possible when the five teenage girls stepped aboard Unicorn in Atlantic City, N.J., just five days earlier or when they stood their first nighttime watch or when they wrapped their hands around the smooth, wooden wheel of the 118-foot schooner. It certainly seemed beyond the horizon when they took their first tentative climbs into the rigging more than nine stories above the deck. But there they were Friday - alongside veteran officers and deckhands, raising and trimming the sails, responding to commands from the helm and bringing the tall ship into the Inner Harbor - under their own power.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2013
The University of Maryland police trainee critically injured after being shot during a training exercise with Baltimore Police in February has filed a multi-million dollar lawsuit against the city and Baltimore County. The lawsuit claims that Officer Rodney Gray and other trainees were directed to go behind a window inside an abandoned building where police were conducting an unauthorized training drill and that they were "targeted as part of the exercise. " Gray says instructor William Scott Kern then "intentionally or negligently" fired his weapon in the direction of the trainees.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2013
A member of the Baltimore Fire Department training to become a rescue diver was hospitalized Thursday after ascending to the surface of a Harford County quarry too quickly during a certification class, according to department officials. The man, who has not been identified, was released from Maryland Shock Trauma Center Friday morning after being treated in its hyperbaric chamber and then being held overnight for observation, said Deputy Chief Paul Moore, director of training and education at the department's training academy.
NEWS
February 17, 2013
The accidental shooting of a University of Maryland police officer trainee in a an exercise is a public relations disaster that Baltimore's mayor and police commissioner wish were just a bad dream ("Campus officer shot in training," Feb. 13). Everyone is asking how this incident that reeks of a Keystone Cops caper could have occurred. But sadly, it's no laughing matter. Apparently the proper authorities were not notified that the training sessions were being conducted at the former Rosewood facility.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | February 16, 2013
The director of Baltimore's police training academy didn't know that instructors were holding exercises at an abandoned psychiatric hospital in Owings Mills. There were no supervisors on site. A police service weapon somehow got mixed up with a practice paint-cartridge pistol. The gun was pointed at a trainee. Many of the missteps surrounding the exercise at which a University of Maryland police recruit was critically wounded last week ran afoul of nationally recognized training safety standards, according to law enforcement experts and a review of past incidents from around the country.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2012
When police and prosecutors gathered in a cramped media room on the ground floor of the Police Department's Fayette Street headquarters to finally announce an arrest in the killing of Phylicia Barnes, the victim's half-brother merely rode down an elevator to watch. Bryan Barnes, inspired by the detectives who worked relentlessly for 16 months on his sister's case, has joined the Baltimore Police Department as a paid trainee. The 24-year-old already has passed background checks, and is scheduled to start as a cadet in the academy this week.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz , Julie.Bykowicz@baltsun.com | December 7, 2009
Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski has asked for an immediate appeals hearing to make the case that the two children of a Baltimore fire cadet killed in a training exercise should be awarded a federal survivors' benefit. In her request Friday to U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder, Mikulski referred to a letter from Baltimore Fire Chief James S. Clack that stated for the first time that trainee Racheal Wilson had the authority to act as a firefighter when she died - information the Justice Department said it was lacking when it denied her family's nearly $300,000 claim.
NEWS
By Scott Wilson and Tom Bowman and Scott Wilson and Tom Bowman,SUN STAFF | April 17, 1997
The sayings were common on Army training posts across the nation.Promising young soldiers were said to be "locked in tight."And almost every morning during call-and-response drills came the sergeant's cry: "Company, are you in the game?" "Yes, drill sergeant," came the reply.But at Aberdeen Proving Ground those sayings became code for sexual conquest and shared secrets, a perversion of Army terms that symbolizes a corrupted chain of command.Now, as the Army prosecutes Staff Sgt. Delmar G. Simpson on 19 counts of rape, Aberdeen officers have banned the phrases -- illustrating the skittishness on a base that has become ground zero in a military-wide search for illegal sex in the ranks.
NEWS
By Scott Wilson and Tom Bowman and Scott Wilson and Tom Bowman,SUN STAFF | May 21, 1997
One of seven remaining defendants in the Aberdeen Proving Ground sex scandal has struck a deal with Army prosecutors and is implicating more sergeants and several officers, in what could be the most significant expansion of the investigation since it became public last year.Staff Sgt. Wayne Gamble, who faces sexual misconduct charges involving 14 female trainees, has agreed to accept a five-year prison term in exchange for pleading guilty to most of the 32 charges against him, according to people familiar with the case.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,candy.thomson@baltsun.com | June 29, 2009
Under their own power. That didn't seem possible when the five teenage girls stepped aboard Unicorn in Atlantic City, N.J., just five days earlier or when they stood their first nighttime watch or when they wrapped their hands around the smooth, wooden wheel of the 118-foot schooner. It certainly seemed beyond the horizon when they took their first tentative climbs into the rigging more than nine stories above the deck. But there they were Friday - alongside veteran officers and deckhands, raising and trimming the sails, responding to commands from the helm and bringing the tall ship into the Inner Harbor - under their own power.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,justin.fenton@baltsun.com | December 12, 2008
A prospective Baltimore firefighter was arrested at the department's training academy Monday, one of nine people indicted on charges of conspiracy to distribute heroin, as part of a sweeping drug investigation that netted several federal indictments in September. Fire officials confirmed that Brandon Ferebee, 20, was taken into custody at the fire academy, where he was slated to graduate next month. He was among a group of people indicted Dec. 3, a follow-up to a wiretap investigation that broke up a large-scale heroin operation on Baltimore's east side and led to the seizure of drugs, guns and thousands of dollars.
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