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NEWS
August 30, 2000
Do you know? When does the kookaburra hunt for food? Answer: The bird eats during the day -- spotting prey on the ground from high in the trees. Learn more! Visit the kookaburra family at The Baltimore Zoo. Read "Kookaburra" by Pauline Reilly. 1. Kookaburras live in Australia 2. The kookaburra can mimic unusual sounds, such as a train whistle.
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NEWS
August 30, 2000
Do you know? When does the kookaburra hunt for food? Answer: The bird eats during the day -- spotting prey on the ground from high in the trees. Learn more! Visit the kookaburra family at The Baltimore Zoo. Read "Kookaburra" by Pauline Reilly. 1. Kookaburras live in Australia 2. The kookaburra can mimic unusual sounds, such as a train whistle.
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FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | September 25, 1998
In an era of the 17-writer movie, filmgoers live in a tyranny of narrative, in which story is all and the formal elements of filmmaking -- such things as shadow, light, camera movement, composition, gesture and sound design -- are given short shrift or are ignored entirely.With "Inside/Out," which makes its U.S. premiere at the Charles Theatre today, Baltimore filmmaker Rob Tregenza stakes a claim for cinema, not as an ox pulling the narrative cart but as the cart itself. Tregenza makes the sort of abstract, theoretically driven films that are commonly put down as "artsy," "intellectual" and "pretentious."
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | September 25, 1998
In an era of the 17-writer movie, filmgoers live in a tyranny of narrative, in which story is all and the formal elements of filmmaking -- such things as shadow, light, camera movement, composition, gesture and sound design -- are given short shrift or are ignored entirely.With "Inside/Out," which makes its U.S. premiere at the Charles Theatre today, Baltimore filmmaker Rob Tregenza stakes a claim for cinema, not as an ox pulling the narrative cart but as the cart itself. Tregenza makes the sort of abstract, theoretically driven films that are commonly put down as "artsy," "intellectual" and "pretentious."
NEWS
By Gwinn Owens | October 7, 1997
SOME YEARS AGO my wife and I invited cousins from Ontario to visit us in Baltimore. In accepting, one of them wrote: "I have never been to Baltimore but I have always imagined I'd like it because it has such a beautiful name."They came in May when the azaleas were everywhere, Sherwood Gardens was in full bloom and the Inner Harbor was just being transformed. Baltimore, they said, lived up to the impression inspired by its name.Baltimore is indeed a beautiful word, ranking right up there with the celebrated most euphonious word, "cellardoor."
NEWS
By Edward H. Shur | December 22, 1991
And a little child shall lead them. (Isaiah 11)HAMLET, N.C. -- They were quiet and serious as they walked into the Hamlet Senior Center, not knowing what to expect.When they left 90 minutes later, there were smiles on their faces and laughter in their voices -- thanks to the efforts of the 1,800 students at Westminster's East and West middle schools.The children, ranging in age from 5 to 18, each lost a parent in the Sept. 3 Imperial Food Products plant fire that left 25 dead and 56 injured in this small community of 6,700 between Charlotte and Fayetteville.
NEWS
By Eileen Shields Fisher | June 4, 1991
My kitchen smells of fresh bread anddaughters, warm and hopeful, believingall is still possible. Inibble from a bowl of seedless blackmarinating olives (balsamic vinegarthe secret). Daughters, like measuredportionsof suffering, should be given onlyto those who can withstand theexperience.I am frightened by theirsoft sturdiness. Imay not be upto daughters.The train whistle seeps into the housefrom the middle of town, where no onelives. Warning:Someone is Going to Find OutI have this andThey Will Come to Stealit away.
FEATURES
By Fort Worth Star-Telegram | August 31, 1992
There are noise alarms to protect vehicles, homes and business establishments; why not a noise alarm to protect people?Allied Electronics of Hong Kong has answered that rather obvious question by making one, and it's now being marketed in the United States by Quorum International of Scottsdale, Ariz.The device, called the Personal Attack Alarm or PAAL, measures 2 inches by 3 inches, about the size of a beeper. But a beeper was never this loud or this piercing. The sound level is 104 decibels, which is "about the same as a freight train whistle," said Ken Withrow of Fenix Enterprises, one of the distributors in the Dallas-Fort Worth area.
NEWS
By Staff Report | May 27, 1993
A man in his mid-30s was struck and seriously injured by a freight train yesterday as he walked along the tracks, ignoring the train's warning whistle, rescue workers said.The man, whose name was not released last night, was walking on tracks near the 1500 block of Woodstock Road near the Howard-Baltimore line about 6:30 p.m. when a CSX freight train approached, said Battalion Chief Donald R. Howell.Witnesses reported the victim was walking on the center of the tracks facing away from the train, which was traveling about 35 mph to 40 mph when it struck him and threw him off the tracks.
NEWS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,Sun Staff Writer | April 9, 1995
The Baltimore and Ohio express carrying passengers from St. Louis to Washington roared around the bend at 58 mph and then, out of the dreary darkness of a damp April night, bore down on the crossing at Rockville.The school bus carrying 27 students from Williamsport High School in Washington County slowed at the dim crossing, but then rattled across the tracks, timidly at first, then lurching ahead as the headlight of the train's engine flooded the bus with a brilliant, fleeting light.At 11:26 p.m. April 11, 1935, train and bus collided.
NEWS
By Gwinn Owens | October 7, 1997
SOME YEARS AGO my wife and I invited cousins from Ontario to visit us in Baltimore. In accepting, one of them wrote: "I have never been to Baltimore but I have always imagined I'd like it because it has such a beautiful name."They came in May when the azaleas were everywhere, Sherwood Gardens was in full bloom and the Inner Harbor was just being transformed. Baltimore, they said, lived up to the impression inspired by its name.Baltimore is indeed a beautiful word, ranking right up there with the celebrated most euphonious word, "cellardoor."
NEWS
By Edward H. Shur | December 22, 1991
And a little child shall lead them. (Isaiah 11)HAMLET, N.C. -- They were quiet and serious as they walked into the Hamlet Senior Center, not knowing what to expect.When they left 90 minutes later, there were smiles on their faces and laughter in their voices -- thanks to the efforts of the 1,800 students at Westminster's East and West middle schools.The children, ranging in age from 5 to 18, each lost a parent in the Sept. 3 Imperial Food Products plant fire that left 25 dead and 56 injured in this small community of 6,700 between Charlotte and Fayetteville.
NEWS
By Candy Thomson and Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | June 5, 2013
The National Transportation Safety Board expects to conclude by week's end its on-scene investigation of the railroad crossing derailment and explosion in Rosedale. The agency, which has been gathering evidence and interviewing witnesses since the May 28 accident, hopes to debrief John Alban Jr., the driver of the truck that slammed into the CSX train, who was hospitalized after the crash and was recently discharged. Completion of the investigation and a determination of what caused the crash will most likely take a year or more, NTSB officials said.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,SUN STAFF | June 11, 1996
The sharp blasts of a train's whistle made time stand still for two volunteer firefighters trying to pull an injured man from a smashed car stuck on the railroad tracks in Lansdowne Sunday afternoon."
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