Advertisement
HomeCollectionsTrain Station
IN THE NEWS

Train Station

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | December 2, 2010
Plans to transform the parking lot at the Savage MARC train station in Howard County into a small community of homes, offices, stores and a hotel are moving closer to fruition, part of Maryland's long effort to redevelop mass-transit parking lots. Construction has not begun on any state-approved "transit-oriented development" projects, though a garage was built at the Owings Mills Metro station in Baltimore County. State transportation officials said that one project proposed at the State Center office complex in downtown Baltimore is expected to get under way this winter.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2014
A man was struck by a vehicle after stepping off a bus near the BWI Thurgood Marshall Airport train station on Wednesday afternoon, according to Maryland Transportation Authority Police. The driver of the vehicle was attempting to pass the bus when the incident occurred about 5:35 p.m. on Amtrak Way, a loop road near the BWI station that serves both Amtrak and MARC rail passengers, said 1st Sgt. Jonathan Green, a MdTA Police spokesman. The man who was struck sustained non-life-threatening injuries but was transported to Maryland Shock Trauma Center as a precaution, Green said.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2014
A man was struck by a vehicle after stepping off a bus near the BWI Thurgood Marshall Airport train station on Wednesday afternoon, according to Maryland Transportation Authority Police. The driver of the vehicle was attempting to pass the bus when the incident occurred about 5:35 p.m. on Amtrak Way, a loop road near the BWI station that serves both Amtrak and MARC rail passengers, said 1st Sgt. Jonathan Green, a MdTA Police spokesman. The man who was struck sustained non-life-threatening injuries but was transported to Maryland Shock Trauma Center as a precaution, Green said.
NEWS
October 6, 2014
I have visited a lot of major cities in my lifetime, but until now I was never inclined to email or write a letter to the editor of the city newspaper to comment about the city and its people. From a recent visit I had to Baltimore, I have found that you have some of the nicest, friendliest and most helpful people I have ever encountered. In particular I owe a debt of gratitude to a gentleman named Mark who helped my wife and I when we got stranded at the train station trying to see the Orioles' last home game.
NEWS
January 27, 1991
The Sykesville Historic Preservation Commission decided last Tuesdayto spend its remaining money earmarked for the train station restoration on burying electrical wiring.Chairwoman Rebecca Herman said the commission will pay to have an unsightly exterior electrical cable buried underground to try to add to the attractiveness of the building.The group also is buying a plaque to be placed somewhere in the train station with a list of names of those who donated $1,000 or more to the restoration project.
EXPLORE
EDITORIAL FROM THE AEGIS | September 25, 2012
For most of us, a trip to New York City means there will be rides on the Subway. Visits to Washington, D.C., are much more palatable when parking problems are traded for train rides on the Metro. Go to San Francisco or Oakland, Calif., and odds are a ride on the BART (short for Bay Area Transit) will be part of the itinerary. Chicago has its L (short for elevated). Boston has the T (short for transportation). Here in the greater Baltimore region, though, train transport is a realistic option only for commuters whose schedules are as regimented and predictable as the days of the week.
NEWS
March 11, 1998
Efforts to restore the Hampstead Train Station on Gill Avenue are moving ahead.The town has purchased the station, the Hampstead Train Station Committee reported at its March 3 meeting. Also, a tarp has been placed over the roof.Donations are being sought to cover the cost of restoration and the committee's incorporation. The incorporation is needed to receive funds from the National Historical Trust, Preservation Maryland and the Maryland Historical Society. Incorporation proceedings cost $450.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | May 15, 1998
To the delight of many Hampstead residents, Maryland Midland Railway Inc. has contributed $500 to the restoration of the town's historic train depot.In a letter April 24, Paul D. Denton, Maryland Midland's president and chief operations officer, promised to contribute more after Maryland Midland completes its purchase of the line that runs through Hampstead. CSX Transportation Inc. owns the line."When our offer to purchase that line becomes reality, we'll double the amount in the attached check, and I'll deliver the second one personally by riding to Hampstead in one of our locomotives," Denton wrote.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Western Maryland Bureau of The Sun | July 24, 1994
SHARPSBURG -- Nearly a century ago, a timber-frame train station was built here on the right side of the tracks. Today, the building -- with ties to the Civil War -- is on the wrong side of the tracks.Antietam Station's location at the western edge of town, and the fact that it's situated on a small lot -- 0.3-acre -- have made it a hard sell for Washington County officials.They're looking for a temporary tenant -- maybe five to 20 years -- until the county can make better use of the building and its association with the nearby Antietam National Battlefield, the site of the bloodiest day of the Civil War.Tourism officials are not interested because most visitors come from interstate highways to the north.
BUSINESS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun reporter | March 9, 2008
You can't buy a ticket anymore, but the ticket window from the former Riderwood train station remains in place in the brick building that was transformed from whistle-stop to single-family home decades ago. The station was built around 1904 by the Northern Central Railroad, after the first station, which was a shed with a one-room station-and-general store, burned down. Passenger service on the two-car Parkton Local between Baltimore and Parkton was dropped in 1959 for lack of riders, and an NCR employee and his wife became the Riderwood station's first private owner residents a few years later.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | August 31, 2014
The rise of this city in Harford County and its decline owed much to U.S. 40 and the car-centric culture of 20th century America. From World War II to the 1960s, motels and gas stations sprouted along the main road from Baltimore to Philadelphia to accommodate road-weary travelers. Diners served up coffee and gossip to neighbors and road-trippers alike on what was also the main local drag. But when Interstate 95 opened, running parallel to U.S. 40 just a few miles to the west, the flow of out-of-town cars slowed to a trickle.
NEWS
August 30, 2014
A 52-year-old Owings Mills man was arrested and charged with attempted second-degree murder and first-degree assault for stabbing another man Friday night at a train station, Baltimore County Police said. Wilbeck Stewart is accused of stabbing a man during a fight at the Owings Mills Metro Station on Painters Mill Road. Police said that about 9:41 p.m., Stewart exited a train and the victim approached him. The men argued and fought over a cigarette, police said. Stewart was arrested at the scene; the victim was taken to the hospital for treatment of serious injuries.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | March 15, 2014
Harford County Sheriff's Office deputies are looking for two men in connection with an reported armed carjacking that occurred early Saturday morning in the vicinity of the MARC train station in Edgewood. Deputies were called to the station off Edgewood Road near the entrance to Aberdeen Proving Ground around 1 a.m., where a 41-year-old Baltimore man reported he had just been carjacked, Sheriff's Office spokesman Edward Hopkins said. According to the preliminary report filed on the incident, Hopkins said, the victim told deputies a friend had wanted to be dropped off at the station to meet of girlfriend.
NEWS
RECORD STAFF REPORT | October 10, 2013
Aberdeen's mayor and city council were looking toward the city's future in a big way Monday night as they presented their take on a proposed water and sewer authority that would combine the Aberdeen, Bel Air, Havre de Grace and Harford County public utilities into one quasi-government governing body. Aberdeen's elected officials also heaped praise on the city's staff - particularly Director of Finance Piribo Jack - for the reaffirmation of the city's AA bond rating, and listened to a presentation about the ongoing plans for a multi-modal transportation hub at the existing Amtrak/MARC train station that could eventually include buildings 12 stories tall.
NEWS
April 21, 2013
The Maryland Transit Administration will put its new southbound train platform into service on Monday at the Halethorpe station, located along Southwestern Boulevard. The existing southbound platform and waiting shelters were closed after the last train departed Friday night, officials said. Starting with the first train Monday morning, April 22, all southbound boarding and detraining will take place on the new, high-level platform. The new station, located about a quarter-mile from the existing station, features handicap accessible elevator towers and a 700-foot raised platform.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2013
Homes, offices and shops would sprout around Baltimore's Penn Station under a preliminary plan developed for Amtrak for the midtown site. The national passenger railroad tapped Beatty Development, the Baltimore-based developer responsible for Harbor East and Harbor Point, late last year to create a master plan and lead the redevelopment of about seven acres of underused land around the century-old train station. Beatty Development's vision calls for the construction of up to 1.5 million square feet of new residences and commercial space at a cost of about $500 million over the next decade.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,SUN STAFF | May 8, 2000
As he played in his front yard on Saturdays, Nathan King would look across the street where, as he saw it, the grown-ups were having all the fun. It was spring 1998 and a dozen volunteers had begun to reverse the decades of neglect that nearly turned the Hampstead train station into a pile of rotting timber. By the fall, Nathan was 10, and he got up the courage to walk over to Wayne Thomas, chairman of the Hampstead Train Station Committee. "I asked how old you had to be to help," said Nathan, who turns 12 next month.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Staff writer | October 21, 1990
Everyone wanted a commuter train station for Odenton. The politicians, the locals, the new residents.Warren Halle banked on it when he proposed his Seven Oaks/Town Center project -- 4,700 homes, a commercial district and office buildings, the biggest development in Odenton's history.So Halle built a house of cards with a new MARC train station as its cornerstone. Alter any part of his blueprint, he warned, and the whole thing would tumble down.That's just what happened last week when the County Council adopted a bill restricting what could be built in the 218-acre Town Center parcel -- the last of the county's three commercial showplaces.
EXPLORE
By Bob Allen | December 29, 2012
For many Carroll residents, a visit to the Pleasant Valley Christmas Train Garden is a touchstone of the holiday season that brings them back year after year. And each year for the past 30 years, there have been others who discover the garden's magic for the first time and make plans to return to the Pleasant Valley Community Fire Company station in pastoral hamlet of Pleasant Valley for a visit the following December as well. Mike Chrest, of Union Mills, a long-time volunteer firefighter, has been the principal curator and keeper of the roughly 18- by 18-foot HO-gauge train garden, which casts a warm glow in the dimly lit gallery-sized room where it is housed.
EXPLORE
By Gwendolyn Glenn | December 25, 2012
When I went to see "Pullman Porter Blues" at Arena Stage this month, not only was it an opportunity to see an excellent play, but it was also a chance to delve into my own heritage. Set in 1937, "Pullman Porter Blues" is the story of three generations of black pullman car porters, the highly trained, uniformed men who took care of every need, around the clock, of first-class, sleeping-car passengers. In the play, the grandfather, Monroe, appears happy to do the bidding of his white supervisor, but he has some tricks up his sleeve.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.