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NEWS
By SIOBHAN GORMAN and SIOBHAN GORMAN,SUN REPORTER | January 29, 2006
When the National Security Agency went shopping for a private contractor to help it build a state-of-the-art tool for plucking key threats to the nation from a worldwide sea of digital communication, the company it chose was Science Applications International Corp. More than three years later, the project, code-named Trailblazer, still hasn't gotten off the ground. And intelligence experts inside and outside the agency say that the NSA and SAIC share some of the blame. Investigations of Trailblazer's early years by Congress and the NSA inspector general criticized the agency for its "confusion" about what Trailblazer would ultimately accomplish and for "inadequate management and oversight" of the program to improve collection and analysis of mountains of digital information.
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BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | January 16, 2014
A trailblazing ballerina will be the face of Under Armour in a marketing campaign this year to attract more women to the sports brand. The Baltimore-based sports apparel and footwear maker said it has signed an agreement with Misty Copeland, a dancer who became the American Ballet Theatre's first African-American soloist in two decades when she joined in 2007. The dancer will be featured in what Under Armour describes as its biggest marketing campaign ever this year for its women's brand as it tries to expand sales in the category.
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NEWS
By SIOBHAN GORMAN and SIOBHAN GORMAN,SUN REPORTER | January 29, 2006
A program that was supposed to help the National Security Agency pluck out electronic data crucial to the nation's safety is not up and running more than six years and $1.2 billion after it was launched, according to current and former government officials. The classified project, code-named Trailblazer, was promoted as the NSA's state-of-the art tool for sifting through an ocean of modern-day digital communications and uncovering key nuggets to protect the nation against an ever-changing collection of enemies.
EXPLORE
By Pat Farmer | April 25, 2013
May is Older Americans Month! The Administration for Community Living and the Administration on Aging, which come under the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, continue this great tradition and their commitment to recognizing the valuable contributions older adults make in communities across our country. This year's theme is "Unleash the Power of Age. " The Administration for Community Living's website, http://www.olderamericansmonth.acl.gov , states, "Every older American has a wealth of talents, experiences, and interests worth celebrating.
EXPLORE
July 7, 2011
Tower Federal Credit Union, which has its headquarters in Laurel, received two Trailblazer awards for Excellence in Marketing and Communications from the Maryland and D.C. Credit Union Association. Tower won Best Marketing Campaign and Best Newsletter for credit unions with $500 million or more in assets. The award-winning marketing campaign focused on the credit union's March 2010 launch of FinanceWorks, an online personal financial management program the credit union offers free to its members.
EXPLORE
By Pat Farmer | April 25, 2013
May is Older Americans Month! The Administration for Community Living and the Administration on Aging, which come under the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, continue this great tradition and their commitment to recognizing the valuable contributions older adults make in communities across our country. This year's theme is "Unleash the Power of Age. " The Administration for Community Living's website, http://www.olderamericansmonth.acl.gov , states, "Every older American has a wealth of talents, experiences, and interests worth celebrating.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | May 12, 2002
He died last week at a York Springs, Pa., veterans hospital of liver cancer. Earl Shaffer was the first man to walk from Georgia to Maine on the Appalachian Trail in one trek. But his death, at 83, received little or no notice. Shaffer was famous, but he didn't wear his achievements on the outside of his pack. He didn't like a lot of fuss. He also didn't like people snoring in trail shelters. Yes, he was crotchety. But in a good way. He loved the songs "San Antonio Rose" and "Polka Dots and Moonbeams" for their key changes and strong beat.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | April 21, 1998
Sixty-three business, religious, civic and social organizations received Trailblazer Awards from Gov. Parris N. Glendening yesterday in Annapolis for voluntary efforts to help families get off welfare.The Stop Shop Save Food Markets chain in Baltimore was honored for creating a job training program for welfare recipients and participating in city Social Services Department job fairs.Laurel Advocacy and Referral Service, a coalition of 15 churches in the Laurel area, was honored for providing social services to families, including helping people get rent subsidies and avoid eviction.
SPORTS
By CHILDS WALKER | November 29, 2005
This column will take the form of a public service announcement: If you like to watch great sports teams or are just a fan of people who do things well, start following the Ottawa Senators. I know, I know. An understanding of hockey just isn't in the water in these parts. I don't have it either. But trust me, this is the great pro sports team nobody in this country is talking about. The Colts? Sure they're undefeated, but they're overexposed. The Pistons and the Spurs? The class of the NBA perhaps, but neither has a terrific offense and both have lost to the Wizards.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff writer | January 12, 1992
In her day, the late Georgia Howard was a trailblazer. Meanwhile, her colleague in the county legal profession, the late Robert H. ArcherJr., earned a reputation at the forefront of county politics for more than three decades.And Charles Reed, another deceased lawyer, was considered something of a Renaissance man, playing the piano, working to protect the environment and advocating a single world government.The three county attorneys, each of whom died within about the past year, were honored for their achievements at a memorial ceremony at Harford Circuit Court Friday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2013
Barbara Walters will retire in May of next year, a source familiar with her plans told Reuters on Thursday . (Deadline Hollywood broke the story; Read it here .) The 83-year-old executive producer and co-host of "The View" has struggled with health issues in recent months. A slip and fall sent her to the hospital earlier this year. That was followed by a bout with chicken pox. "The View," one of the most successful daytime talk shows on television, is in the process of a radical overhaul with several of the original co-hosts gone or about to go. Walters was the first female co-anchor of a network morning show at NBC's "Today" in 1974.
NEWS
By Nick Cafferky, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2012
James Dixon joined the Baltimore Police Department in 1954 as a black officer in an era of widespread racial prejudice. Police posts were segregated and blacks were not allowed in patrol cars On Tuesday, a quarter-century after he retired as a sergeant, Dixon returned to the department for a ceremony to honor his service and thank him for his role in helping the department through a time of social change. Dixon, 77, was given a BPD hat and coffee mug. "I think today was really good for him because I don't think he realized how far the Police Department has come," said Derrick Dixon, James' son. "So for him to come out here and see a lot of Afro-American officers and commissioners, I think it blew his mind.
EXPLORE
January 30, 2012
Barclay Street 3200 block, between 8 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. Jan. 23. TomTom GPS, radio stolen from unlocked vehicle. 3100 block, between 7 and 9 p.m. Jan. 25. Red, 2001 Mitsubishi Montero with Maryland tags 756M972 stolen. Beechdale Road 100 block, between 5:30 p.m. Jan. 25 and 8:45 a.m. Jan. 26. Cash stolen from vehicle. Bellona Avenue 6100 block, between 5:30 p.m. Jan. 23 and 5:30 a.m. Jan. 24. Silver, 2008 Chevy Trailblazer with Maryland tags 6AD8800 stolen.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2011
Reuben Dagold wasn't sure what he was going to do when he retired as a bureau director of the Baltimore City Health Department 11 years ago at age 62. He knew one thing. "I told myself that I wasn't going to take on any responsibility," Dagold recalled. The day after he retired, Dagold joined a group from the Mountain Club of Maryland for a hike through Washington Monument State Park. He had not hiked since he was a high school student at Poly, when two teachers had organized a moonlight hike.
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | August 13, 2011
It took months of negotiations to bring NFL commissioner Roger Goodell and players union chief DeMaurice Smith to a point where they could find enough common ground to end the offseason lockout and finalize a 10-year collective bargaining agreement. It only took a couple of phone calls to bring them together in Baltimore on Saturday morning to eulogize Hall of Fame tight end John Mackey at a public memorial service at the Cathedral of Our Lady the Queen. Sylvia Mackey invited both of them to speak at the two-hour ceremony that celebrated the on-field and off-field accomplishments of her beloved husband, who passed away after a long battle with frontotemporal dementia on July 6. "No one made a bigger impact on the NFL than John Mackey ," said Goodell.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2011
Howard Markel's "An Anatomy of Addiction" starts, like a shot, on May 5,1884. A Bellevue Hospital orderly summons Dr. William Stewart Halsted to save the leg of a laborer who has fallen from a scaffolding. Famous for the speed and virtuosity of his surgery, Halsted notes the shattered shinbone piercing through the skin — and abruptly retreats from the examination table, because he's not fit to operate. He takes a cab home and sinks "into a cocaine oblivion that lasted more than seven months.
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | August 13, 2011
It took months of negotiations to bring NFL commissioner Roger Goodell and players union chief DeMaurice Smith to a point where they could find enough common ground to end the offseason lockout and finalize a 10-year collective bargaining agreement. It only took a couple of phone calls to bring them together in Baltimore on Saturday morning to eulogize Hall of Fame tight end John Mackey at a public memorial service at the Cathedral of Our Lady the Queen. Sylvia Mackey invited both of them to speak at the two-hour ceremony that celebrated the on-field and off-field accomplishments of her beloved husband, who passed away after a long battle with frontotemporal dementia on July 6. "No one made a bigger impact on the NFL than John Mackey ," said Goodell.
BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | January 16, 2014
A trailblazing ballerina will be the face of Under Armour in a marketing campaign this year to attract more women to the sports brand. The Baltimore-based sports apparel and footwear maker said it has signed an agreement with Misty Copeland, a dancer who became the American Ballet Theatre's first African-American soloist in two decades when she joined in 2007. The dancer will be featured in what Under Armour describes as its biggest marketing campaign ever this year for its women's brand as it tries to expand sales in the category.
EXPLORE
July 7, 2011
Tower Federal Credit Union, which has its headquarters in Laurel, received two Trailblazer awards for Excellence in Marketing and Communications from the Maryland and D.C. Credit Union Association. Tower won Best Marketing Campaign and Best Newsletter for credit unions with $500 million or more in assets. The award-winning marketing campaign focused on the credit union's March 2010 launch of FinanceWorks, an online personal financial management program the credit union offers free to its members.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com | November 13, 2009
Benjamin Banneker Historical Park and Museum now boasts a replica of the one-room log cabin that the African-American scientist built and lived in on his western Baltimore County farm. Officials formally opened the 224-square-foot cabin Thursday on the park grounds in Catonsville, two days before the 278th anniversary of Banneker's birth. The home furthers efforts to educate the public about this significant figure in local, state and national history whose accomplishments included helping to survey the land that became the nation's capital.
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