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June 16, 2011
Editor: I am a resident of Cedarday Drive. I just read your article in The Aegis on-line. I believe that you only have one side of the story and should spend some time and understand our concerns. The county government including Mr. Craig have not been interested in listening to our viewpoint. In fact, his secretary told one of my neighbors that he did not want to talk to "those people!" It seems as though this project is going to go through despite the outcome of the meeting on the 21st.
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NEWS
October 8, 2014
Far from a tragedy, Foundry Row represents a great opportunity for the Owings Mills community ( "Suburban tragedy," Sept. 5). It will at least provide some well-paying jobs and revenue to help jump start the Owings Mills-Reisterstown area. Now if we could only get the old mall replaced with a Costco center like the one in Columbia. Stuart Hirsch, Reisterstown - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2011
The temporary Berger Cookie shortage got us thinking. The temporary shortage of Berger Cookies on store shelves, reported by Mary Carole McCauley, got us thinking about other cookies. The Berger is, of course, is a brand name, but what would you call the style of cookie that a Berger is? It's not what I would call a chocolate top, but what is it? It's tempting to compare it to the Oreo, a brand name that has come to stand in for a style of cookie. But there is a readily available style name -- sandwich creme -- that describes the Oreo and many other similar cookies on the market.
NEWS
October 5, 2014
I've been reading "A Pattern Language: Towns, Buildings, Construction" by Christopher Alexander. This is a mighty must-have-doorstopper for anyone interested in New Urbanism and the vocabulary of spaces that a person would actually want to live in. It was published in 1977, so architects, designers and city planners have had almost 40 years to soak in the intelligence of constructing buildings and developing public spaces that feel humane....
NEWS
By Peter Ephross | January 27, 2014
When James Rouse created Columbia nearly 50 years ago, he never imagined the Maryland town would be catapulted into the national consciousness as the site of the latest senseless shooting. Unlike most postwar suburban communities, Columbia was planned, a product of 1960s-era idealism. Rouse — a shopping mall pioneer as well as the developer of Harborplace in Baltimore, Faneuil Hall in Boston, and South Street Seaport in New York City — founded Columbia on the notion that it is both possible and necessary to build safer, more livable cities.
NEWS
June 24, 2013
Yes, Baltimore County State's Attorney Scott Shellenberger, a crime was committed, but it wasn't by James Laboard ("Officer found not guilty," June 21). Mr. Laboard was in his home watching his TV when a gang of kids threw a rock at his front door. Never mind the fact that this wasn't the first time they had done this to Mr. Laboard's home and others in the neighborhood! Mr. Laboard's home was vandalized. He had every right to be angry. The fact that he is a police officer should never have been mentioned in court or in the newspapers.
NEWS
February 3, 2012
It was with great sadness that I saw the photos in The Sun of hunters posing triumphantly next to the carcasses of the animals that they had shot and killed in Africa ("Africa calls adventurous hunters," Jan. 29). Included in the photos were a dead water buffalo, lion, nyala, oryx and elephant. Isn't there a way for people to derive enjoyment from these magnificent animals' existence without causing their often painful demise? In Africa, there are safaris that offer tourists the opportunity to photograph wildlife in preserves and parks in their natural habitat.
NEWS
July 25, 2011
What a tragedy that has occurred in Norway, all because someone sees no value in "multiculturalism," a word that is defined also by religious tolerance and racial equality. This makes me reflect upon our own country and some of the racial comments I encounter from individuals and the divisive rhetoric I hear on our airways. Fortunately, we are a country founded on the principles of equality for all, and these rights are protected by our Constitution and enforced by the court of law. It has taken time to assimilate the many ethnic groups within our society and right the wrongs (some by war)
NEWS
October 5, 2014
I've been reading "A Pattern Language: Towns, Buildings, Construction" by Christopher Alexander. This is a mighty must-have-doorstopper for anyone interested in New Urbanism and the vocabulary of spaces that a person would actually want to live in. It was published in 1977, so architects, designers and city planners have had almost 40 years to soak in the intelligence of constructing buildings and developing public spaces that feel humane....
NEWS
April 18, 2013
What happened in Boston was a tragedy ("At least 3 dead, scores injured in Boston blasts," April 16). Our thoughts are with the victims and their families. We applaud the efforts of the first responders and nameless bystanders who ran to help. This senseless act will not be forgotten. Having said that, I cannot but help feel resentment toward the way the media, both national and local, in print, on air and on screen, have turned this event into a national outcry, and yet another 24/7 self-indulgement-fest of getting the best coverage, hitting all the angles, and speaking to the most witnesses.
NEWS
By Karsonya Wise Whitehead | August 17, 2014
I would like to write my sons a love letter about peace and post-racial living, of a wonderful time when all people move freely, of a place where black bodies are not endangered and black life is not criminalized. But that is not my story, and it is not their reality. As much as I try, I cannot hide my frustration about what happened to Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo., my disgust over what happened to Eric Garner in Staten Island, N.Y., my outrage over what happened to John Crawford III in Ohio, and my horror over what happened to Ezell Ford in Los Angeles, Calif.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2014
Charlotte Rollenhagen still remembers the first time she saw Dorothy Hutchins at Johns Hopkins Hospital. It was 1940, and the 10-year-old girl had been badly burned when her dress caught fire on the kitchen stove in her family's Highlandtown home. Her entire back was burned, as well as part of her left leg and her left arm, which she flapped in vain to put the flames out. "The picture of this little girl is indelibly placed in my mind," said Rollenhagen, who at the time was a rookie 21-year-old nurse.
FEATURES
By Kim Fernandez, For The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2014
Rebecca Butchock's bed is feeling very empty this week, and her 2-year-old son, Liam, worries that everyone he loves who gets out of his sight may never come back. Their beloved dog, Ruby, got away from a friend during a walk earlier this week and they've mobilized a solid team of friends -- those they know in real life and some they only know on social media -- to find her. It's been a tragic month for the mother and son. “On the fourth of July,” says Butchock, “my boyfriend and Liam's father died very suddenly of a heart attack.” On the 12th, a friend offered to take Ruby for a hike at a farm in Glyndon to give Rebecca a bit of a break, but something spooked the terrier mix and she bolted, yanking her leash out of the friend's hand and vanishing into the woods.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | July 3, 2014
His family doesn't know if Zack actually heard any of it firsthand. Maybe he was at that City Council meeting (some people swear he was) or maybe not. Either way, they figure he probably knew about the things that were said, how his neighbors in the small town of Norman, Okla., paraded to the microphone that evening in 2010 to denounce the proclamation of GLBT -- Gay Lesbian Bisexual Transgender -- History Month. They warned of a "slippery slope" to hate-crime laws, said gay people were out to "recruit" children, claimed 78 percent of all gay people have -- and die from -- sexually transmitted diseases.
NEWS
May 6, 2014
It's now been more than two weeks since Islamic militants attacked a girls' boarding school in remote northeast Nigeria and abducted more than 300 young women between the ages of 16 and 18, carrying them off into the bush on a convoy of buses and trucks. But apart from a few dozen students who managed to escape in the first few hours after their capture, not a trace of the girls has been found so far. And the kidnappings haven't stopped: Today U.N. officials announced that at least eight more girls were seized by extremists in the same part of the country as last month's abductions.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2014
Annapolis Opera's production of Puccini's "La Boheme" was a triumph at Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts, where it was enjoyed by a near-capacity audience at its opening and a sold-out house in its second performance. Excellent performances were offered by a cast of stellar singers in leading and minor roles. Vocalists were supported by Annapolis Symphony Orchestra musicians under the direction of Ronald J. Gretz, now in his 31st season as Annapolis Opera's artistic director and conductor.
NEWS
February 2, 2014
A week ago we faced the reality of a previously unimaginable tragedy. It was not unimaginable because of the scope of its violence, the premature taking of precious lives, or the shadow of fear cast over the hundreds of families enjoying the warm comfort of a community gathering space on a cold winter day. Tragedies like these are, sadly, all too real and all too common. What was, and what still is, unimaginable is that it could happen here; that it happened here. We are not the first and we certainly will not be the last community to confront such an unimaginable reality.
NEWS
June 16, 2011
In Steve Kilar's article "Families, neighbors mourn lives cut short" (Jun 15) about the deaths of teenage friends Courtney Angeles and Emerald Smith after they were struck by a hit-and-run driver, he states "Outside Courtney's home, mostly young mourners smoked cigarettes to calm their nerves. " There is no medical proof that cigarette smoking in young teens calms nerves. Implying this may cut other young teens' lives short, though. And trust me, they won't be dying calmly. G.P. Webb
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | February 26, 2014
Troy Douglas no longer sits at his desk at William Paca Elementary. The third-grader's classmates and teachers have decorated it with cards and balloons to preserve his memory. The 8-year-old no longer walks past the house on Lakewood Avenue that burst into flames last week as he made his way home from school, leaving Troy buried under bricks and debris. A wreath of blue flowers - his favorite color - hangs from the chain-link fence surrounding the ruined structure. At Troy's funeral Wednesday, mourners said that though the bright-eyed boy is gone, Southeast Baltimore will not forget the smile and sense of humor that brought his community together in both life and death.
NEWS
February 2, 2014
A week ago we faced the reality of a previously unimaginable tragedy. It was not unimaginable because of the scope of its violence, the premature taking of precious lives, or the shadow of fear cast over the hundreds of families enjoying the warm comfort of a community gathering space on a cold winter day. Tragedies like these are, sadly, all too real and all too common. What was, and what still is, unimaginable is that it could happen here; that it happened here. We are not the first and we certainly will not be the last community to confront such an unimaginable reality.
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