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By KENNETH E. SHARPE | December 15, 1991
Two years ago this week, a U.S. swat team of 27,000 troops invaded Panama, and arrested the chief drug lord, general and ruler, Manuel Noriega. U.S. Ambassador to Panama Deane Hinton called it "the biggest drug bust in history." The outcome of the current Noriega trial in Florida is still uncertain, but the evidence has already shown why the U.S. drug war in Latin America is condemned to failure.What has clearly emerged from the trial is how Panama's deposed leader and his military made a fortune by fighting on both sides in the drug war.General Noriega has a stack of letters from the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration praising his cooperation: he helped the DEA make drug busts, confiscated a bank owned by a drug cartel and smashed a major cocaine lab. The United States was grateful for his help in spying on Cuba and aiding Nicaragua's contra exiles, and he received pay from the CIA (the U.S. government maintains it paid its man in Panama $320,000, while he claims $10 million)
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 24, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Cocaine smugglers working with Colombian drug cartels are starting to set up factories, warehouses and trucking companies in Mexico to exploit the flood of cross-border commerce expected under the North American Free Trade Agreement, U.S. intelligence and drug-enforcement officials say.The Mexican smugglers are buying and setting up the companies "as fronts for drug trafficking," says a report written by an intelligence officer at the U.S....
NEWS
By G. JEFFERSON PRICE III | October 25, 2005
An Indian hero has died. Brother Jose Vetticattil of the Montfort Brothers of St. Gabriel, of Hyderabad in Central India, was not nearly as famous as Mother Teresa of Calcutta or Gandhi. But their spirit of peace, grace and charity was alive in him. Word reached me recently of the death of Brother Jose, as he was known to some of the most vulnerable and abused of Hyderabad's citizens, whom he helped. He died last month at age 49 after a massive heart attack. The date of his death was exactly one year after I met him in Hyderabad, where I had gone to visit a project he had founded 10 years earlier to rescue and restore children who were the victims of horrific abuses of sex traffickers.
NEWS
By Ginger Thompson and Ginger Thompson,Mexico City Bureau | January 5, 1993
BABORIGAME, Mexico -- In Latin America's war against drugs, the armies win some battles. Drug traffickers win others. But the most consistent losers are Indian families like those who live in this remote area of the Sierra Madre mountains.What happened last October in this Indian village of mud and wood huts is being held up as an example of how badly things can go wrong. Mexican soldiers stormed the village in a "marijuana raid," terrorizing the inhabitants, destroying their homes and killing their livestock.
NEWS
By Roger Twigg and David Simon and Roger Twigg and David Simon,Staff Writers | March 16, 1992
An interstate drug strike force has been approved by Gov. William Donald Schaefer to stop drug traffickers -- primarily from New York -- from sending teen-agers into Baltimore and other Maryland cities to set up street-level narcotics operations.The strike force is to be formally announced during the Governor's Summit on Violent Street Crime this Thursday at the Convention Center.Dr. Neil Solomon, chairman of the Governor's Drug and Alcohol Abuse Commission, said the new strike force, which is to be coordinated by State Police investigators, is being organized to disrupt, intercept and dismantle any organized trafficking and to prosecute those who are arrested.
NEWS
By Ginger Thompson and Ginger Thompson,Mexico City Bureau | January 5, 1993
BABORIGAME, Mexico -- In Latin America's war against drugs, the armies win some battles. Drug traffickers win others. But the most consistent losers are Indian families like those who live in this remote area of the Sierra Madre mountains.What happened last October in this Indian village of mud and wood huts is being held up as an example of how badly things can go wrong. Mexican soldiers stormed the village in a "marijuana raid," terrorizing the inhabitants, destroying their homes and killing their livestock.
NEWS
By Roger Twigg and David Simon and Roger Twigg and David Simon,Staff Writers | March 16, 1992
An interstate drug strike force has been approved by Gov. William Donald Schaefer to stop drug traffickers -- primarily from New York -- from sending teen-agers into Baltimore and other Maryland cities to set up street-level narcotics operations.The strike force is to be formally announced during the Governor's Summit on Violent Street Crime this Thursday at the Convention Center.Dr. Neil Solomon, chairman of the Governor's Drug and Alcohol Abuse Commission, said the new strike force, which is to be coordinated by state police investigators, is being organized to disrupt, intercept and dismantle any organized trafficking and to prosecute those who are arrested.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | December 26, 1992
BOGOTA, Colombia -- Several of the world's top drug traffickers have finalized plea bargaining agreements allowing them to serve fewer than 10 years in jail, according to Colombian officials. The sentences stand in stark contrast to the life terms that they would likely receive if found guilty by U.S. courts.U.S. officials are deeply concerned about the negotiations, which affect, among others, three brothers who allegedly helped found the so-called Medellin cocaine cartel. The officials note that other major traffickers such as Carlos Lehder, another cartel founder, are serving life sentences in U.S. maximum security prisons.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 12, 2004
WASHINGTON - Two and a half years after the Bush administration made the eradication of Afghanistan's drug trade a high priority, poppy growing and heroin production have exploded, providing money and logistical aid to al-Qaida and other militants, bolstering Afghan warlords and threatening that nation's stability, officials and experts say. After being suppressed during the final year of Taliban rule, the drug industry has grown to the point where Afghanistan...
NEWS
August 12, 2005
THE RECENT closure of the American consulate in Nuevo Laredo, Mexico, was the wrong response to the carnage playing out along the U.S.-Mexico border. Last Friday, on the same day that Ambassador Tony Garza announced the consulate's reopening, rival drug gangs vying for control of limited transit routes into the United States claimed their latest victims: the head of the City Council's Public Security Commission and his bodyguard. Both men were gunned down in what has become a routine occurrence on Nuevo Laredo's blood-soaked streets.
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