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NEWS
December 23, 1990
Colombia's new policy of shielding drug traffickers from extradition in exchange for confessions and promises to quit the trade raises troubling questions. Five traffickers have turned themselves in so far, under a decree issued by President Cesar Gavira. That includes Fabio Ochoa Vasquez, one of the alleged leaders of the Medellin cocaine cartel, who is charged with helping to kill a federal informant.Fabio Ochoa, 33, had not been charged with a crime under Colombian law but has been indicted in the United States of murder and smuggling in $1 billion worth of illicit drugs.
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NEWS
September 1, 2014
In the face of the near-overwhelming crises that our nation is experiencing on both domestic and international fronts, a sliver of profound encouragement exists in the fact that the tragedy of estimated 30 million human slavery and sex-trafficking victims is an issue of common cause and priority for the Obama administration and Congress. But their response must be heightened in the face of these horrific crimes against humanity. The State Department's Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons (TIP)
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NEWS
By Roger Twigg | January 4, 1992
On June 12, a Maryland trooper stopped a motorist for speeding on the John F. Kennedy Highway and to his surprise found 71.5 pounds of cocaine in the trunk of the Cadillac.The search of the vehicle took place after the trooper found suspected cocaine on a drivers license that the man had apparently been using as a tool to cut and shape lines of the illegal substance.That seizure was the largest last year by troopers who patrol the state's highways with one eye for traffic violators and another for motorists who arouse their suspicions as possible drug traffickers.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2014
From a home base in Houston, federal authorities say, a Remington native has been directing a cross-country drug operation that shipped large quantities of heroin to Baltimore, New York, New Orleans and elsewhere. Fred Douglas Brooks III, 46, had already served two federal prison terms for drug trafficking when he allegedly launched a new venture despite having betrayed a crew of Mexican suppliers by testifying against them in 2005. The latest business - a "high-level, interstate narcotics-trafficking and money-laundering operation," according to federal prosecutors in Louisiana - flourished until his arrest June 30 in Houston, authorities say. At least 16 people, including Brooks, have been charged in connection with the case; seven are charged in U.S. District Court in Maryland.
NEWS
By MARTHA HONEY | November 24, 1996
LATE ONE AFTERNOON in July 1987, the front door to our house in San Jose, Costa Rica, suddenly burst open. A half-dozen local narcotics agents, wearing blue jeans and gold chains, charged in, dragging in tow our hysterical secretary, Carmen Araya.The agents ransacked file drawers in our ground-floor office and then tore through the rest of the house, looking for drugs. They found none. No matter, they said, they already had the "smoking gun." They produced a brown paper package addressed to us, with a return address from the Interior Ministry in Nicaragua.
NEWS
By Ana Arana and Ana Arana,Special to The Sun | December 23, 1990
BOGOTA, Colombia -- Drug traffickers addressed a communique to U.S. Ambassador Thomas McNamara yesterday, charging that the U.S. justice system is inflexible where Colombians are concerned while it offers deals to U.S. citizens involved in drug cases.Signed "The Extraditables," the name the traffickers adopted when the Colombian government began an anti-drug campaign last year, the message, sent by fax to major local news agencies, is the first ever directed to a representative of the U.S. government.
NEWS
By David Simon | October 25, 1991
Baltimore Police Detective Harry Edgerton figured the real target was the younger kid, a 17-year-old street dealer by the name of Dashawn Powell. Five shots fired point-blank into his head and neck suggested that much. The older victim, Kelvin Thompson, was probably an afterthought, shot because he shared a stoop with Powell that night.A veteran of the homicide unit, Detective Edgerton knew that much after an hour's work. A day or two in the neighborhood, and he thought he had the motive: Dashawn had taken 50 bags of dope on consignment from the New Yorkers working the Hollins Street corners.
NEWS
By Ana Arana and Ana Arana,Special to The Sun | April 30, 1991
BOGOTA, Colombia -- President Cesar Gaviria's policy of enticing major drug traffickers to surrender to Colombian authorities for trial in local courts as a way to avoid extradition to the United States could be threatened by allegations that three of the country's biggest alleged traffickers who accepted the offer are continuing to run their cocaine business from inside prison.Brothers Fabio, Jorge Luis and Juan David Ochoa, suspected members of the Medellin cartel, were the first to accept President Gaviria's offer to surrender.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | March 26, 1998
Undercover narcotics officers posing as drug dealers arrested 11 suspected drug traffickers and users and one prostitute yesterday in crackdowns at three South Baltimore locations, police said."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 27, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Searching for a new weapon in the United States' drug battles abroad, the Clinton administration has been debating proposals to impose stringent economic sanctions against Mexico's biggest traffickers.The measures under consideration include freezing the U.S. assets of suspected drug smugglers and their associates, barring the traffickers' legitimate commercial ventures from doing business with companies in the United States, and blocking the traffickers' access to U.S. banks.
NEWS
By Will Fesperman, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2014
A 31-year-old North Carolina man was sentenced to 46 months in prison Friday following a plea agreement on charges of sex trafficking in Anne Arundel County. County police had apprehended the man, Michael Darnell Boswell Jr., in June 2013 near the Baltimore-Washington International Airport based on information from an undercover detective. Prosecutors had alleged that Boswell drove at least two women around Maryland, Virginia and North Carolina to engage in sex acts. According to a press release from the U.S, Attorney's Office, Boswell first had the women host private parties and dances, then sex work soon followed.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2014
Rarely do drug traffickers pick up their phones and openly conduct their business, plainly stating the quantities of drugs they would like to buy and prices they would like to pay. Instead, they generally use coded language in an attempt to obscure their activities. And even when investigators think they know the meaning of the conversations they catch on wiretaps, they still have to convince a jury that they've interpreted the interactions correctly. The difficulty of that job was on display this month in the case of Danilo Garcia, who was accused of trafficking heroin from New York to Baltimore after a long surveillance operation.
NEWS
February 11, 2014
The next Annapolis Neighborhood Watch meeting is scheduled for Wednesday, Feb. 12, from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at Annapolis Police Headquarters, 199 Taylor Avenue. The meeting topic is human trafficking, and retired Detective Jeffrey Hartlove will speak about a human trafficking case involving brothels operated in Annapolis. Food will be served, so RSVP to Sgt. Jessica Kirchner at 410-268-9000 ext. 7233 or jkirchner@annapolis.gov .
NEWS
By Luke Lavoie, llavoie@tribune.com | January 14, 2014
An Ohio man pleaded guilty Tuesday to human trafficking charges in connection with the pimping of an Ohio woman in southern Howard County, according to State's Attorney spokesman Wayne Kirwan. Howard Draper Jr., 57, of Toledo, Ohio, pleaded guilty to a human trafficking charge and a prostitution charge before opening statements Tuesday in his jury trial in Howard County Circuit Court. Draper was sentenced by Judge Richard Bernhardt to 12 years in prison, 10 for the human trafficking charge and two for the prostitution charge, Kirwan said.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | December 17, 2013
A Baltimore man charged with running a prostitution business and sex trafficking a minor was sentenced by a U.S. District Court judge Monday to more than 11 years in prison, followed by five years of supervised release. Franklin Roosevelt "Frank" Coit, 35, operated a brothel on Madison Avenue with Jamar Marvin Simmons, a 31-year-old ex-Baltimore firefighter who was sentenced to 15 years in prison on Friday, according to the pair's plea deal. Coit will be required to register as a sex offender after his release.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | December 13, 2013
A former Baltimore firefighter was sentenced to 15 years in federal prison for running a brothel and bringing women - including a 16-year-old girl - from around the country to Baltimore so he could hire them out as prostitutes. Jamar Simmons, 31, ran a brothel with Franklin Coit, 35, and preyed on poor, homeless or otherwise vulnerable women, according to the U.S. attorney's office. Simmons pleaded guilty in September to a federal sex trafficking charge; Coit had pleaded guilty to the same charge a month earlier.
NEWS
By DALLAS MORNING NEWS | May 11, 1998
MEXICO CITY -- The landmark North American Free Trade Agreement has made it easier than ever for Mexican traffickers to smuggle drugs, and U.S. authorities are not doing enough to counter the fast-growing threat, a U.S. task force has concluded.Sophisticated drug gangs are investing in everything from trucking companies and rail lines to warehouses and shipping firms to shield their trafficking activities, according to a confidential report by Operation Alliance, a task force led by the U.S. Customs Service.
NEWS
March 8, 1991
A metropolitan police task force targeting violent drug traffickers has been formed by local, state and federal law enforcement agencies in hopes of reducing the violence associated with the narcotics trade.The task force is a response to gunplay that has sent the homicide rate in Baltimore and other cities soaring and left people running for cover as drug rings battle over turf -- as in the case of the midafternoon spray of bullets at North and Pulaski streets Feb. 20 that left two reputed drug dealers dead and two apparent bystanders wounded.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2013
The head teller at a Perry Hall bank and the reputed leader of a drug trafficking organization pleaded guilty in U.S. District Court to a money laundering conspiracy, court records show. According to a copy of their plea agreements, Deanna Bailey was a member of a drug ring that moved at least 500 pounds of marijuana from the "southwestern United States to Maryland for the purpose of distributing it for profit once it arrived. " The government alleges Bailey was head of the organization - she says she was only a member, records show.
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