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By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,SUN REPORTER | January 12, 2007
Marylanders pulled over by police for traffic violations could be back on their way more quickly under a proposal to computerize the state's ticketing system. Judicial and law enforcement officials are pushing a program that would allow state troopers and other officers to swipe a driver's license and registration, generating a ticket that would be transmitted electronically to the court system. Eventually, violators would have the option of paying tickets via the Internet. E-citations, as they were called at a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing yesterday, would help cut down on the 1.3 million paper tickets processed annually and help protect police, who can be hit by passing vehicles or assaulted by motorists during traffic stops.
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SPORTS
By Zach Helfand, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2012
Many of Maryland's high school leaders, a collection of student-athletes from high schools across the state, came to Reservoir High on Tuesday to learn about leadership, ride tricycles and get traffic tickets. Some explanation is probably called for. Tuesday was the Maryland Public Secondary Schools Athletic Association's third annual Student-Athlete Leadership Conference, where students from 134 schools learned about topics ranging from being a captain to nutrition to making smart decisions.
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NEWS
February 19, 1996
WE RECEIVED A disturbing letter from a woman who reviews traffic tickets issued by Baltimore County police officers for the District Court of Maryland. She enclosed several copies of speeding tickets:* A 20-year-old man driving 125 mph in a 65 mph zone on Interstate 95 near Route 43 in White Marsh. $515 fine. Five points.* A 25-year-old man driving 98 mph in a 65 mph zone on Interstate 83 in Hunt Valley. $265 fine.* A 33-year-old man driving 113 mph in a 45 mph zone on U.S. 40 in Catonsville, just before the Howard County line.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2010
Back in the mid-1990s, when I covered the daily cop beat, I got pulled over by a Baltimore police officer. I can't recall the infraction, but I'm sure I had done whatever it was the officer said I had done. He approached, and then noticed my police press card on the dash. The officer told me how he had been on a police motorcycle leading Pope John Paul II's procession into Baltimore during the pontiff's visit in October 1995, and how he would love to have a copy of a picture we ran in the newspaper.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Staff Writer | October 4, 1992
During one eight-day period last year, firefighters in Towson answered 96 false alarms -- all because of one nursing home's faulty alarm system.The experience is one reason why the Baltimore County Fire Department is asking the County Council to approve the use of a new state law that enables local governments to issue the equivalent of traffic tickets -- carrying fines -- for repeated false alarms and uncorrected fire code violations.The enabling state law took effect Oct. 1, and the County Council is to vote on the change in local law tomorrow night.
SPORTS
By Zach Helfand, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2012
Many of Maryland's high school leaders, a collection of student-athletes from high schools across the state, came to Reservoir High on Tuesday to learn about leadership, ride tricycles and get traffic tickets. Some explanation is probably called for. Tuesday was the Maryland Public Secondary Schools Athletic Association's third annual Student-Athlete Leadership Conference, where students from 134 schools learned about topics ranging from being a captain to nutrition to making smart decisions.
NEWS
By MICHAEL DRESSER | June 22, 2009
One of the most common arguments advanced by opponents of speed law enforcement is that traffic tickets - whether generated by a camera or a police officer - are just a "money grab" by the mean old government. If they are, to quote our former vice president, so what? The most important thing about traffic fines from moving violations is where the money comes from - the violator's pocket - not where it goes. The point is to deter behavior that turns our roads into death traps. Take the recently approved bill allowing speed cameras to be used in work zones.
SPORTS
By Willoughby Mariano and Bianca Prieto and Tribune Newspapers | December 2, 2009
After five days of international speculation about Tiger Woods' crash outside his Isleworth mansion, the Florida Highway Patrol announced Tuesday that it gave the world's No. 1 golfer a traffic ticket. The billion-dollar athlete already has paid the $164 fine, court records show. Woods, 33, drove carelessly when he steered his Cadillac Escalade into a fire hydrant and then into a neighbor's tree about 2:25 a.m. Friday, troopers said. In addition to the fine, he received four points on his driving record, FHP spokeswoman Sgt. Kim Montes said.
NEWS
August 25, 2007
A Baltimore County police lieutenant enacted a short-lived policy requiring officers under his supervision to write an average of at least three traffic tickets each day they worked on patrol. Under the order, patrol officers' ability to get time off was linked to the number of tickets they wrote. Officers who did not meet the "expectation" and averaged fewer than one citation per day would be last to choose their days off, regardless of their shift seniority, according to the order. Lt. Dean E. Brubaker informed his officers of the requirement in March and documented it in a written order in May. County police spokesman Bill Toohey said the initiative was ended as soon as supervisors learned of it. "It was one lieutenant on one shift in one precinct three months ago," Toohey said yesterday.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | June 22, 2001
Baltimore police said yesterday that they have begun an internal investigation into the traffic arrest of a 25-year-old Baltimore woman who was strip-searched at the Central Booking and Intake Center. Bridget Watson of the 5000 block of Moravia Road was driving in the 2900 block of E. Madison St. about 5 p.m. June 15 when she was pulled over by Officer Gahiji Tshamba of the Eastern District, according to court records. She was given four tickets charging her with illegally changing lanes, excessive speed, noise violations and "failure to sign signature if requested by police," the records say. After Watson signed the tickets, Tshamba asked her to sign them again - the way she had signed her driver's license, said Watson's attorney, Leonard Redmond.
SPORTS
By Willoughby Mariano and Bianca Prieto and Tribune Newspapers | December 2, 2009
After five days of international speculation about Tiger Woods' crash outside his Isleworth mansion, the Florida Highway Patrol announced Tuesday that it gave the world's No. 1 golfer a traffic ticket. The billion-dollar athlete already has paid the $164 fine, court records show. Woods, 33, drove carelessly when he steered his Cadillac Escalade into a fire hydrant and then into a neighbor's tree about 2:25 a.m. Friday, troopers said. In addition to the fine, he received four points on his driving record, FHP spokeswoman Sgt. Kim Montes said.
NEWS
By MICHAEL DRESSER | June 22, 2009
One of the most common arguments advanced by opponents of speed law enforcement is that traffic tickets - whether generated by a camera or a police officer - are just a "money grab" by the mean old government. If they are, to quote our former vice president, so what? The most important thing about traffic fines from moving violations is where the money comes from - the violator's pocket - not where it goes. The point is to deter behavior that turns our roads into death traps. Take the recently approved bill allowing speed cameras to be used in work zones.
NEWS
By Tyeesha Dixon and Tyeesha Dixon,Sun reporter | March 21, 2008
Unreadable handwritten tickets and a 25-minute traffic stop might soon be things of the past for Howard County residents. The Howard County Police Department has received a grant of more than $48,000 from the state to begin purchasing equipment to issue electronic citations, commonly called e-citations. The hope is to eliminate unnecessary paper use, cut traffic stop time and reduce chances of error, said Capt. Glenn Hansen, commander of the department's Information and Technology Management Bureau.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,Sun Reporter | September 16, 2007
Roderick Wolfe's spate of traffic violations finally caught up with him. Morgan State's talented wide receiver missed yesterday's game against Winston-Salem State when he was picked up on a warrant for failure to appear in court in July. Morgan coach Donald Hill-Eley said after the 19-17 loss that Wolfe was taken to Central Booking but was expected to be released as soon as today. Wolfe has outstanding fines of more than $500 for traffic violations that include driving on a learner's permit without supervision and driving a vehicle that was uninsured.
NEWS
August 25, 2007
A Baltimore County police lieutenant enacted a short-lived policy requiring officers under his supervision to write an average of at least three traffic tickets each day they worked on patrol. Under the order, patrol officers' ability to get time off was linked to the number of tickets they wrote. Officers who did not meet the "expectation" and averaged fewer than one citation per day would be last to choose their days off, regardless of their shift seniority, according to the order. Lt. Dean E. Brubaker informed his officers of the requirement in March and documented it in a written order in May. County police spokesman Bill Toohey said the initiative was ended as soon as supervisors learned of it. "It was one lieutenant on one shift in one precinct three months ago," Toohey said yesterday.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,Sun Reporter -- Weather Blogger | April 6, 2007
Responding to reports that traffic cases on federal land were being routinely dismissed, the Maryland General Assembly has approved legislation to ensure that state traffic laws can be applied to roads on military bases and other U.S. government property. The House of Delegates unanimously approved legislation yesterday that would change the state's definition of highway to include federal land. In February, the Senate voted, 46-0, to pass the bill. "To me, it was just fixing an oversight or fixing something that had never been intended by anyone," said Sen. Brian E. Frosh, a Montgomery County Democrat who sponsored the measure.
NEWS
By Tyeesha Dixon and Tyeesha Dixon,Sun reporter | March 21, 2008
Unreadable handwritten tickets and a 25-minute traffic stop might soon be things of the past for Howard County residents. The Howard County Police Department has received a grant of more than $48,000 from the state to begin purchasing equipment to issue electronic citations, commonly called e-citations. The hope is to eliminate unnecessary paper use, cut traffic stop time and reduce chances of error, said Capt. Glenn Hansen, commander of the department's Information and Technology Management Bureau.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | October 31, 1996
A state trooper who won a commendation for her role in a 1991 shootout asked an Anne Arundel Circuit judge yesterday to reverse her demotion for allegedly trying to fix a speeding ticket for a Washington Capitals hockey player two years ago.Trooper Kimberly Brooks was demoted from trooper first class to trooper and suspended for 15 days in October 1995 after a police trial board found she offered hockey tickets to another trooper to drop speeding charges against...
NEWS
By Nick Shields and Andrew Schaefer and Nick Shields and Andrew Schaefer,sun reporters | February 10, 2007
A light rail train driver and five passengers were taken to hospitals with minor injuries after the train and a tractor-trailer truck collided yesterday in Hunt Valley, authorities said. The train was derailed by the collision, leading to an interruption of service in the area. The truck driver was traveling south on Gilroy Road near Schilling Circle about 10:45 a.m. when he made a left turn to cross the tracks, according to Maj. Stanford Franklin, a Maryland Transit Administration police spokesman.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,SUN REPORTER | January 12, 2007
Marylanders pulled over by police for traffic violations could be back on their way more quickly under a proposal to computerize the state's ticketing system. Judicial and law enforcement officials are pushing a program that would allow state troopers and other officers to swipe a driver's license and registration, generating a ticket that would be transmitted electronically to the court system. Eventually, violators would have the option of paying tickets via the Internet. E-citations, as they were called at a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing yesterday, would help cut down on the 1.3 million paper tickets processed annually and help protect police, who can be hit by passing vehicles or assaulted by motorists during traffic stops.
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