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NEWS
April 30, 2013
It's no mystery that the crossroads of Routes 1 and 24 in Bel Air is a traffic tangle, so it's perfectly reasonable that the Bel Air town government would want to spend at least a portion of an unexpected $200,000 highway windfall on a study of the intersection. When it comes down to doing the study, though, figuring out what's wrong isn't really the issue. Figuring out how to disperse traffic at busy times of day is going to be the part that, if someone can figure out, is worth spending a fair amount of money on. There's no reason, however, to expect a good resolution to the difficult problem at hand.
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NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2014
City officials are considering a plan to have two-way traffic on St. Paul and Calvert streets, which are main one-way roads in the central part of Baltimore. On Wednesday, Baltimore's Board of Estimates approved a $140,000 contract with Baltimore firm Sabra, Wang & Associates Inc. to perform a traffic study for the roads, along with a study of corridors from Fayette Street to University Parkway. lbroadwater@baltsun.com Twitter.com/lukebroadwater
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NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Staff Writer | November 8, 1992
The head of Carroll County's Industrial Development Authority is expected to ask the Westminster City Council to finance a traffic study on Route 97 near the airport.Russell A. Sellman is bringing his request to the council in person tomorrow night, four months after sending Mayor W. Benjamin Brown a written request for the study. The county planning office proposed a traffic study to IDA when Marada Industries Inc. announced that it would expand to the east side of Route 97.The council will meet at 7 p.m. at the Westminster fire hall on East Main Street.
NEWS
April 30, 2013
It's no mystery that the crossroads of Routes 1 and 24 in Bel Air is a traffic tangle, so it's perfectly reasonable that the Bel Air town government would want to spend at least a portion of an unexpected $200,000 highway windfall on a study of the intersection. When it comes down to doing the study, though, figuring out what's wrong isn't really the issue. Figuring out how to disperse traffic at busy times of day is going to be the part that, if someone can figure out, is worth spending a fair amount of money on. There's no reason, however, to expect a good resolution to the difficult problem at hand.
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Staff Writer | November 10, 1992
The Westminster City Council made no promises last night on the county Industrial Development Authority's request for the city to share the cost of a $25,000 traffic study of Route 97 near the county's air business center.Authority Chairman Russell A. Sellman's request was prompted by the planned expansion of Marada Industries Inc., an auto parts manufacturer in the center, which is expanding on the east side of Route 97.But the request became tangled in a dispute over why it took four months for Mr. Sellman to get a spot on the council agenda.
NEWS
By Traci A. Johnson and Traci A. Johnson,Sun Staff Writer | May 11, 1994
The Hampstead Town Council voted last night to ask the State Highway Administration (SHA) to review recommendations to alleviate traffic congestion on Main Street.Mayor C. Clinton Becker and the council last night read the suggestions made by the town's traffic study committee. Town Manager John A. Riley suggested sending the recommendations to the SHA to help determine whether the proposed solutions were feasible."I already suggested that Gene Straub [SHA district engineer] walk through the town with Ken [Russell, town police chief]
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Staff Writer | August 17, 1993
For months, residents of Linton Springs in South Carroll have been asking for a traffic study of Linton Road, their only access to Route 26.Now the State Highway Administration is counting cars on the winding road, but residents say the timing is wrong and the count will be off."August is vacation month," said Joseph H. Mettle, chairman of the community association. "This study would only represent about 66 percent of the normal total traffic and won't reflect a worst case scenario."Next month, when most vacationers have returned and students are driving to high school, traffic will be at the typical levels, he said.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | March 5, 1998
A city traffic study at a Roland Park intersection described by some neighbors as dangerous shows evidence of minor speeding over the posted limit of 25 mph.Some residents fault the study because it was not conducted during peak rush hours.Kurt L. Kocher, spokesman for the Department of Public Works, said the study indicates westbound traffic at the intersection of Schenley Road and West Cold Spring Lane averages 30 mph, while eastbound traffic averages 28 mph.The study was done a week ago between 10 a.m. and 11 a.m., Kocher said, with the speed of 200 vehicles -- 100 in each direction -- timed with a radar gun."
NEWS
By LAURA CADIZ and LAURA CADIZ,SUN REPORTER | July 9, 2006
A county-commissioned traffic study warning that downtown Columbia's street network is near capacity calls into question a county plan that would turn downtown Columbia into a bustling urban environment with added homes and businesses. The study by the Orlando, Fla.-based Glatting Jackson consulting firm also suggests reducing the number of new residential and commercial units planned for Columbia's Town Center -- a vision in sharp contrast to the recommendations that emerged from a county-sponsored community design session in October.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | January 29, 1998
Without major improvements to its main arteries and construction of service and connector roads, South Carroll is facing severe congestion as early as 2002.A modest five-year estimate includes 1,500 new homes and several major businesses that would increase traffic by about 2 percent annually. The resulting traffic impact will lead to "unacceptable operations during both the morning and evening peak hours at all intersections along Route 32, including the primary crossroads with Route 26," according to a new traffic study.
NEWS
February 23, 2013
The traffic impact study for Mays Chapel Elementary School that was published on the Baltimore County Public Schools web site Feb. 20 is seriously flawed ("Balto. Co. eschews facts in Mays Chapel Elementary decision," Feb. 19). Cullane Court, which is featured prominently in the study maps, has 11 residences. However, the study's maps failed to include Straffan Drive, a road bordering the school between Cullane Court and Roundwood Road. There are 110 residences on Straffan Drive, and the rear of most of them abut the current deeded open space park, where the county plans to build the school.
EXPLORE
April 26, 2012
Editor: I wanted to let you know that I am very concerned about the proposal to locate a Waste Transfer Facility in the 800 block of Philadelphia Road in Joppa. Numerous people living near the site have written to me expressing their concern and at times their outrage over the facility being placed in this location. They are worried about how so many large trash trucks coming and going will safely navigate that section of Philadelphia Road which is already very busy. They are concerned about noise, dust and potential contamination. Of course they are afraid their property values will plummet.  I couldn't state more strongly that their concerns must be addressed and their questions answered to the fullest. One family who owns a home and property next to the proposed site has lived in their home for over 50 years. The couple says they are heartbroken to think they must spend their retirement years dealing with all the problems they anticipate will come with a trash facility located so close to their home.
EXPLORE
Letter to The Aegis | April 3, 2012
Editor: Please consider printing my letter to the editor. Although I am a resident of Jarrettsville, I have been following with great interest the coverage of the proposed transport station for Route 7 in Joppa. I travel daily on this road and heartily agree with the residents who say that this road cannot handle any more traffic. Traveling Route 7 has always been a much more pleasurable drive than taking I-95. Why can't it remain a scenic alternative to the busier highways of Route 40 and I-95?
EXPLORE
June 1, 2011
A generation of lobbying is about to pay off as the new North Laurel Community Center is set to open June 3 on Whiskey Bottom Road. The celebration of this long-awaited resource, however, contrasts sharply with a chronic problem on that very same road. Whiskey Bottom Road has been the scene of many accidents, and last week county officials got an earful from residents pleading for measures aimed at slowing auto traffic and making the road safer for drivers and pedestrians. A county traffic engineer at the meeting told residents the county would prohibit trucks on the road, post an additional speed-limit sign, install reflectors in the median and conduct a traffic study at the entrance of the community center to determine whether a traffic light is warranted.
NEWS
By Sarah Breitenbach, Patuxent Publishing | April 16, 2010
Cars whizzing down Montgomery Road in Ellicott City came to an unexpected halt Friday morning at the previously unencumbered intersection of Brampton Parkway and New Cut Road. County Executive Ken Ulman gathered with residents about 10 a.m. to flick the switch on a new traffic light at the busy intersection, bringing vehicles to a stop on Montgomery Road, which is part of Route 103. The light, which cost the county $175,000, was installed by the State Highway Administration.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,nicole.fuller@baltsun.com | January 17, 2010
Tension between the Cordish Cos., which is planning a large slots parlor at Arundel Mills mall, and neighbors was evident when architects and engineers detailed the planned 200,000-square-foot casino during a presentation Wednesday night. Residents object to the casino in their neighborhood, saying it will worsen existing traffic and crime problems. Cordish says a groundbreaking for the slots parlor is just months away if county and state officials give final approvals for the casino design, which appears likely.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,SUN STAFF | April 24, 1996
The Board of County Commissioners shaved $31,500 yesterday from the cost of a proposed traffic study in the Freedom District corridor that could accelerate state plans to make Route 32 a four-lane highway.The study is essential because such traffic reports are tied to land use and the rapidly growing Eldersburg area could be built out within four years, Marlene Conaway, the county's deputy planning chief, told the commissioners."We're trying to finish the land-use plan down there this year," she said.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | January 21, 2000
A traffic and parking study commissioned by Towson University for a planned $28 million sports complex is obsolete and inaccurate, a neighborhood group opposed to the project has said. A consultant hired by Rodgers Forge Community Association to critique the study concluded that doubling the seating capacity at the university's Minnegan Stadium could create major traffic and parking problems in surrounding neighborhoods. "Since they unveiled this expansion plan, we have not stopped speaking out against it," said Janice Moore, a spokeswoman for the Rodgers Forge group.
NEWS
By June Arney and June Arney,Sun reporter | February 27, 2008
State Highway Administration officials have answered concerns of homeowners and lawmakers about a proposed residential development by calling for new information and studies related to traffic flow. SHA is asking Dale Thompson Builders Inc., developer of the Riverdale project, to do additional studies, and will do some of the work through its own agency. The 30-acre condo and townhouse development is proposed for the Route 32 and Cedar Lane along the Middle Patuxent River at the edge of west Columbia.
NEWS
By Karen Kaplan and Karen Kaplan,Los Angeles Times | January 5, 2008
Researchers at the University of Utah have found that motorists talking on cell phones drive more hesitantly than undistracted drivers and, as a result, are increasing everyone's average drive time by 5 percent to 10 percent. For someone with a two-hour round-trip commute, that means as much as 12 extra minutes behind the wheel each day. Over the course of a year, the excess time in traffic easily could top 50 hours. "On your commute home tonight, your commute will be slower because of people who are using their cell phones," said psychologist Dave Strayer, whose findings will be presented Jan. 16 at the annual meeting of the Transportation Research Board, which is part of the National Academies.
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