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NEWS
July 29, 1996
IN NORWOOD HEIGHTS, a small community near Baltimore's southwestern border, drivers on Beechfield Avenue need X-ray goggles to pass through safely.That's because a huge, overgrown shrub decorates a corner on Beechfield -- shady and beautiful to look at unless you're driving, of course. Thomas Millenburg Jr., a retired export manager for a grain company, recently complained to your Intrepid One about this problem.Each time Millenburg heads to Norwood Heights to visit his sister-in-law, that particular shrub hinders his safe passage.
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NEWS
By MICHAEL DRESSER and MICHAEL DRESSER,SUN REPORTER | June 13, 2006
A morning commuter driving to Baltimore on Interstate 70 passes an electronic sign in western Howard County. It says the expected travel time to the Beltway is 30 to 40 minutes - three times longer than usual. Thanks to the sign, the driver has options. He or she can exit at U.S. 40 or take one of several other alternate routes. Five signs, installed last week by the State Highway Administration between Mount Airy and the Beltway along I-70, are part of a $310,000 pilot project aimed at providing motorists with up-to-the-minute information on the road conditions ahead.
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NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | September 20, 1996
Street signs marking Paradise Avenue in Mount Airy seem to fly off the posts. "Children at Play" is another favorite of the "collectors," who have been ripping off an average of two street signs a month in town.The thefts have made Town Councilman Norman C. Hammond so angry that he is offering a $15 reward for returned signs, no questions asked. The Town Council agreed last month to give $100 to anyone who provides the names of sign thieves and locations of stolen signs.In the year since Hammond began offering the $15 reward, he has paid $15, for one returned parking sign.
NEWS
By Jody K. Vilschick and Jody K. Vilschick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 6, 2002
THE DISCUSSION of yield signs has thumped some sensitive bumpers. "Thank you so much for finally helping me understand what has been a pet peeve of mine since I moved to Maryland from Michigan. I thought Maryland drivers' total disregard for the yield signs on entrance ramps to highways and interstates was because of an epidemic of rudeness and aggressiveness that made both New York City and Los Angeles drivers seem downright polite by comparison," said Terry O'Brien, who lives in Ellicott City.
FEATURES
By RICHARD O'MARA and RICHARD O'MARA,SUN STAFF | May 18, 1998
One day not long ago, I got home from work and found a new sign posted on my street: DEAD END.Such a thing naturally raises questions about your social prospects. Who wants to live in a DEAD END?So I called City Hall. They told me where I could put my questions.No, really, there is such a place. It is a yellow building far out on East Lombard Street. It's called the Sign Shop.When I got there I conveyed my dismay to Frank J. Murphy, a supervisor in the traffic division of the Department of Public Works.
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky | February 6, 1992
Baltimore's plan to pay $360,000 for 10 new electronic traffic signs around Oriole Park at Camden Yards ran into a roadblock yesterday: two members of the Board of Estimates, who insisted that any signs outside the new state ballpark should be paid for by the state, not the city."
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Staff Writer | August 10, 1993
Several Sykesville residents want more stop signs on Central Avenue. One wants the existing one removed.In response to residents' safety concerns, the Town Council voted last month to erect a stop sign at the intersection of Central and First avenues.But, said Mayor Kenneth W. Clark at last night's council meeting, "We are still at the monitoring point. We want to continue to hear from residents.""What you did was a good thing but it's not enough," said resident Brian Rains. "We need more signs and more traffic control by police."
NEWS
July 10, 1995
The Intrepid One is dead set against defacing road signs or property that belongs to someone else. But sometimes you see a street or road sign that's been "altered," shall we say, and it makes you chuckle.Everyone remembers not long ago when someone kept adding the word "Hon" beneath the "Welcome to Baltimore" sign on the Baltimore-Washington Parkway, expressing the sentiments of many of us locals.And we recall a sign on Interstate 70 in Frederick County warning of "Falling Crocks" in a mountainous area just beyond a bridge.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Staff Writer | August 10, 1993
Several Sykesville residents want more stop signs on Central Avenue. One wants the existing one removed.In response to residents' safety concerns, the Town Council voted last month to erect a stop sign at the intersection of Central and First avenues.But, said Mayor Kenneth W. Clark at last night's council meeting, "We are still at the monitoring point. We want to continue to hear from residents.""What you did was a good thing but it's not enough," said resident Brian Rains. "We need more signs and more traffic control by police."
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Jamie Stiehm contributed to this article | August 11, 1998
Frank Vellegia would like to believe that Baltimore is enough of a big-league city to handle more than two or three major events at the same time. The longtime Little Italy restaurateur -- who saw his business take a nose dive Saturday night -- would like to believe it, but he doesn't.Why, Vellegia asked yesterday, did city officials and local media send out "doomsday predictions" of major gridlock downtown for Saturday evening's triple-header of Ravens football, Reba McEntire at the Baltimore Arena and a jazz show at Pier 6?
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Jamie Stiehm contributed to this article | August 11, 1998
Frank Vellegia would like to believe that Baltimore is enough of a big-league city to handle more than two or three major events at the same time. The longtime Little Italy restaurateur -- who saw his business take a nose dive Saturday night -- would like to believe it, but he doesn't.Why, Vellegia asked yesterday, did city officials and local media send out "doomsday predictions" of major gridlock downtown for Saturday evening's triple-header of Ravens football, Reba McEntire at the Baltimore Arena and a jazz show at Pier 6?
FEATURES
By RICHARD O'MARA and RICHARD O'MARA,SUN STAFF | May 18, 1998
One day not long ago, I got home from work and found a new sign posted on my street: DEAD END.Such a thing naturally raises questions about your social prospects. Who wants to live in a DEAD END?So I called City Hall. They told me where I could put my questions.No, really, there is such a place. It is a yellow building far out on East Lombard Street. It's called the Sign Shop.When I got there I conveyed my dismay to Frank J. Murphy, a supervisor in the traffic division of the Department of Public Works.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,SUN STAFF | April 28, 1998
WITHIN A WEEK of the General Assembly's adjourning sine die, one member of the Annapolis lobbying corps had defected to a rival firm.In the latest chapter of State House lobbying wars, Joel D. Rozner, a Prince George's County lawyer, announced that he is leaving the firm of Evans, Rozner & Stierhoff and returning to the stable of Alan M. Rifkin.Rozner had worked with Rifkin some years ago. But then, so did the principal partner of Evans, Rozner & Stierhoff -- Gerald E. Evans, the highest-paid lobbyist in Annapolis and Rifkin's archrival.
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | September 20, 1996
Street signs marking Paradise Avenue in Mount Airy seem to fly off the posts. "Children at Play" is another favorite of the "collectors," who have been ripping off an average of two street signs a month in town.The thefts have made Town Councilman Norman C. Hammond so angry that he is offering a $15 reward for returned signs, no questions asked. The Town Council agreed last month to give $100 to anyone who provides the names of sign thieves and locations of stolen signs.In the year since Hammond began offering the $15 reward, he has paid $15, for one returned parking sign.
NEWS
July 29, 1996
IN NORWOOD HEIGHTS, a small community near Baltimore's southwestern border, drivers on Beechfield Avenue need X-ray goggles to pass through safely.That's because a huge, overgrown shrub decorates a corner on Beechfield -- shady and beautiful to look at unless you're driving, of course. Thomas Millenburg Jr., a retired export manager for a grain company, recently complained to your Intrepid One about this problem.Each time Millenburg heads to Norwood Heights to visit his sister-in-law, that particular shrub hinders his safe passage.
NEWS
January 8, 1996
Today marks the beginning of an occasional feature in this space that we'll fondly call The Intrepid One's Favorite Ignored Traffic Sign Or Signal Award Of The Week.We've all seen (and probably run a few) of them. A few examples, you say? Check these:* The flashing red lights to Goucher Boulevard from Loch Raven Boulevard.* The no-right-on-red sign from Guilford Avenue onto Monument Street.* Stop signs in Columbia.* The 55 mph speed limit on Interstate 95 from Baltimore to the Beltway.* Traffic signs in the Howard Park community in Harford County.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,SUN STAFF | April 28, 1998
WITHIN A WEEK of the General Assembly's adjourning sine die, one member of the Annapolis lobbying corps had defected to a rival firm.In the latest chapter of State House lobbying wars, Joel D. Rozner, a Prince George's County lawyer, announced that he is leaving the firm of Evans, Rozner & Stierhoff and returning to the stable of Alan M. Rifkin.Rozner had worked with Rifkin some years ago. But then, so did the principal partner of Evans, Rozner & Stierhoff -- Gerald E. Evans, the highest-paid lobbyist in Annapolis and Rifkin's archrival.
NEWS
December 20, 1993
Does Maryland love New York?Take a gander at the traffic signs along Interstate 95. They might give you that idea.The majority (aside from exit signs) only inform motorists that the highway they're traveling leads to the Big Apple.Attentive reader Jerry Marciniak called this to our attention. In a very amusing letter, he rises to the defense of those "other" cities like Wilmington, Del.; Philadelphia; and Trenton, N.J., that lie between here and New York."Is it possible that someone in the State Highway Administration may have a grudge against these cities?"
NEWS
July 10, 1995
The Intrepid One is dead set against defacing road signs or property that belongs to someone else. But sometimes you see a street or road sign that's been "altered," shall we say, and it makes you chuckle.Everyone remembers not long ago when someone kept adding the word "Hon" beneath the "Welcome to Baltimore" sign on the Baltimore-Washington Parkway, expressing the sentiments of many of us locals.And we recall a sign on Interstate 70 in Frederick County warning of "Falling Crocks" in a mountainous area just beyond a bridge.
NEWS
December 20, 1993
Does Maryland love New York?Take a gander at the traffic signs along Interstate 95. They might give you that idea.The majority (aside from exit signs) only inform motorists that the highway they're traveling leads to the Big Apple.Attentive reader Jerry Marciniak called this to our attention. In a very amusing letter, he rises to the defense of those "other" cities like Wilmington, Del.; Philadelphia; and Trenton, N.J., that lie between here and New York."Is it possible that someone in the State Highway Administration may have a grudge against these cities?"
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