Advertisement
HomeCollectionsTraffic Signals
IN THE NEWS

Traffic Signals

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,Sun Columnist | June 11, 2007
The corner of Northern Parkway and Falls Road was named the most dangerous intersection in Maryland in an auto insurance company survey a few years ago, so it's here that I would first test my new idea for slowing down traffic. The new idea is this: We need to add another light to our traffic signals. I say this because hardly anyone bothers to slow down for yellow lights anymore. A yellow light now means, "Floor it, Jack," to most motorists. It means, "Pedal to the metal." It means, "No way am I catching that red light with the rest of you losers."
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | May 25, 2013
Someone's been making off with the big industrial batteries that provide backup power at traffic signals in Baltimore, and now the thefts are being investigated by the city inspector general's office, which looks into allegations of waste, fraud and abuse in municipal government. A representative of the battery's manufacturer said the thieves most likely would have tried to sell the 54-pound batteries as scrap for their lead content. Russell Conelley, an agent in the IG's office, confirmed in an interview with The Baltimore Sun that it is investigating battery thefts reported to have occurred along Harford Road in Northeast Baltimore and Wilkens Avenue in Southwest Baltimore.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Tyeesha Dixon and Tyeesha Dixon,Sun reporter | February 10, 2008
Howard County has completed the installation of backup power systems at all county-maintained traffic signals, public works officials announced last week. Each battery-powered system will supply up to 10 hours of electricity, if there are power failures at any of 84 intersections, about half the traffic signals in the county. The systems cost about $4,000 for each intersection, said Diane Schwarzman, acting chief for traffic engineering for the Department of Public Works' Bureau of Highways.
TRAVEL
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2013
After two pedestrians died and 13 were injured last summer on Ocean City streets, city officials and the State Highway Administration devised a campaign to get motorists and those on foot to be more aware of each other. The effort includes highly visible markings on crosswalks and signs directing pedestrians to them and retimed traffic signals to get vehicles to slow down. “Ocean City is one of Maryland's largest cities all summer, but every week there's turnover and a new population,” said Melinda Peters, SHA administrator.
NEWS
October 17, 1993
The State Highway Administration is going back to the starting point in an effort to satisfy local pressure for trafficcontrols at the intersection of Route 140 and Royer and Meadow Branch roads west of Westminster."
NEWS
January 24, 1994
A strange thing happened to Baltimore's traffic signals last week.Joseph E. Miller wasn't looking after them.The last time that happened was in 1952, before Mr. Miller started working for the city, installing, painting, wiring, trouble-shooting, repairing, changing light bulbs for thehundreds of signals scattered throughout Baltimore.Over the years, mayors and City Council members have come and gone.Lombard and Pratt streets have changed directions several times. Charles became a one-way street.
NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2011
White Marsh Boulevard has reopened between Perry Hall and Honeygo boulevards now that traffic signals are functioning again after power outages due to Hurricane Irene disabled traffic signals, a Baltimore County Police spokeswoman said Thursday afternoon. Drivers had been instructed to seek alternate routes and to use extreme caution if they have to be in the area, said the spokeswoman, Louise Rogers-Feher, Thursday morning. The out-of-service signals had caused traffic backups at both intersections since the storm, she said.
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Staff Writer | October 5, 1992
When Bob Marsiglia leaves his home in The Greens at 5:30 a.m. for his job in Owings Mills, traffic on Route 140 around Westminster isn't too bad.Coming home is a different story."
NEWS
By William Wan and Doug Donovan and William Wan and Doug Donovan,SUN STAFF | April 22, 2005
Stuck in traffic with her foot seemingly glued to her car's brake pedal, Bililynn Savage muttered, "Another day, another headache." In front of her along Lombard Street, yesterday's evening rush was a sea of brake lights as drivers honked, yelled and inched their way homeward. On days like this, when she hits every red light, said the 47-year-old, she glares suspiciously at the city's traffic lights and wonders aloud if they are conspiring against her. According to a national study on traffic signals, she may be not far off. The results, released this week, support what Savage and other frustrated commuters have long felt: Red lights are too long, green lights too short - and they never seem to work together.
NEWS
October 5, 2006
Watchdog, a new weekly feature, makes its debut Tuesday. It holds government agencies accountable for problems occurring in neighborhoods, such as missing street signs, broken water mains, traffic signals or street lights burned out. Please call us at 410-332-6735 and leave a message or e-mail us at watchdog@baltsun.com. A reporter and a photographer might contact you to follow up on your complaint.
NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2012
As of 9 a.m. Tuesday, traffic was slow on Telegraph Road at Route 32 in Anne Arundel County, due to an accident involving two vehicles. Accidents were slowing traffic at Eutaw and Robert streets in Baltimore City and Reisterstown Road and Seven Mile Lane in Baltimore County. According to State Highway Administration spokesman Charlie Gischlar, about 60 traffic signals were still not working on state-maintained roads as of Tuesday morning, primarily in Baltimore County, Howard County and Prince George's County.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2012
BGE officials continued to scramble Sunday to restore power to nearly more than 257,000 customers as the area suffered with temperatures near 100 degrees for a third day and braced for a chaotic Monday-morning commute. After the state was rocked Friday night by a fast-moving series of storms, Gov. Martin O'Malley said he would closely monitor the restoration work of Baltimore Gas and Electric, as well as Pepco, and would urge them to beat their own projections. The power companies have said they could restore power to nearly all area homes by this weekend.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2012
The Bryn Mawr School and Gilman School have each agreed to pay $350,000 to Baltimore City to fund traffic-calming and streetscape improvements along Northern Parkway and Roland Avenue, which intersect near the two schools in the Roland Park area. Under the agreement, announced Wednesday, the schools will maintain the improvements that fall in the public right-of-ways on Northern Parkway between Roland Avenue and Boxhill Lane, and on Roland Avenue between Northern Parkway and Cold Spring Lane.
EXPLORE
January 6, 2012
It's always an education being in the same room with Paul Dongarra, so let's parse his editorial comments ("Space available, but community OK lacking for medical offices," Catonsville Times, Jan.4) about our community input meeting to see if he has any clue what he's talking about. First, I don't know how you put a medical office development project closer to a "transportation hub" than setting it directly on a Beltway ramp, four minutes from a hospital, and backing it up to an interstate highway with volumes of 230,000 vehicles per day. Our property has been zoned office since 1984, before any protesting condo owner across Kenwood Avenue ever lived there.
EXPLORE
November 6, 2011
I have no problem with a senior residence on the Y property ("Senior residence facility proposed for Y's property," Catonsville Times, Nov. 2). However, before this happens there needs to be a traffic signal at the entrance as well as a turn lane. I have watched my parents grow older and more frail in their driving. I can imagine older drivers attempting to make a left turn into or out of the driveway without a traffic light. I don't want to read about accidents (and deaths)
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | October 22, 2011
The problem: A traffic signal near the Owings Mills Metro stopped cars at a road closed for construction. The back story: Through many years of serving the greater Baltimore region, Watchdog has developed a strong appreciation for properly calibrated — and located — traffic control devices. That's why Susan T. Brooks' email about a traffic signal that was stopping vehicles at a road closed for construction caught Watchdog's attention. Brooks regularly takes the subway to her job at the VA Medical Center in downtown Baltimore.
NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2011
White Marsh Boulevard has reopened between Perry Hall and Honeygo boulevards now that traffic signals are functioning again after power outages due to Hurricane Irene disabled traffic signals, a Baltimore County Police spokeswoman said Thursday afternoon. Drivers had been instructed to seek alternate routes and to use extreme caution if they have to be in the area, said the spokeswoman, Louise Rogers-Feher, Thursday morning. The out-of-service signals had caused traffic backups at both intersections since the storm, she said.
NEWS
August 31, 2011
If Hurricane Irene has accomplished anything - aside from causing Gov. Martin O'Malley to spend what seems like his every waking hour touring flood damage and power outages for the TV cameras - it's to demonstrate that a great many Maryland drivers don't know what to do when a traffic signal is out of operation. Perhaps you have had the frustrating experience of getting stuck at a blacked-out intersection where drivers don't seem to understand who should cross the road next.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.