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NEWS
April 23, 2010
The 2010 Maryland General Assembly Session was an incredible disappointment to many of us in the traffic safety community. While there were significant opportunities for legislators to make our roads safer, these were mainly wasted opportunities. As has been reported, the Ignition Interlock Bill died in the House Judiciary Committee. This important, life-saving legislation would have required anyone convicted of driving above the legal alcohol limit - .08 to have an ignition interlock system installed in their car. Here is where the disappointment begins.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 7, 2014
One is the number that ought to be memorized by everyone caring about traffic safety in Maryland ( "Sixty-five (still) saves lives," March 4). Rural interstates accounted for one of Maryland's 485 traffic deaths in 2011, and one of 505 deaths in 2012. Frenzy about rural interstate speed limits demonstrates either tragic ignorance or heartless political pandering. Simple physics explains why interstates have remarkable safety records. Interstates vastly reduce the common causes of crashes, such as crossover conflicts at intersections, head-on collisions with adjacent, opposing traffic and roadside hazards like trees, telephone poles, sharp curves and sheer drop-offs.
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NEWS
By Ed Heard and Ed Heard,SUN STAFF | October 26, 1995
The Howard County Police Department has been awarded the 1994 Chiefs' Challenge trophy for its enforcement of traffic safety.The award, sponsored by the International Association of Police Chiefs and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, was for one of several categories decided by a judging committee that reviewed departments based on size and jurisdiction.Howard County was designated as a safety-program leader among departments with 101 to 500 officers.Howard County has 315 sworn officers.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | September 23, 2013
Traffic safety and congestion along Route 152 will be discussed at the next Fallston Community Council meeting this Tuesday evening, Sept. 24. Dave Williams, the community council chairman, said the State Highway Administration is sending a representative to discuss findings of a study the agency conducted earlier this year and some improvements that have been made as a result. Williams said he and other community leaders approached SHA after a number of horrific accidents occurred last year along the highway that links Fallston to I-95 and is one of Harford's most congested roads.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,Staff Writer | June 17, 1992
A poster created by an Ellicott City elementary pupil is among 11 from Maryland chosen as winners in the the national American Automobile Association Traffic Safety Poster program."
NEWS
By Peg Adamarczyk and Peg Adamarczyk,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 26, 1997
THE PROBLEMS were glaringly apparent to everyone living or traveling along Outing or Catherine avenues and Duvall Highway in the early 1980s.Scores of adolescents walking to and from George Fox Middle School spilled onto the busy streets because there were no sidewalks and only narrow road shoulders. Sooner or later, someone was going to get hurt.It happened in December 1989. A youngster was hit by a car and injured on the way to school.The George Fox PTA set up a committee to push for traffic safety improvements.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 29, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Two consumer groups accused the Transportation Department yesterday of manipulating car crash tests and selectively releasing the results to support the automobile industry's contention that stricter fuel economy standards would produce more dangerous cars.The safety agency's pictures of a head-on collision between a large and a small car have been widely shown in recent advertisements sponsored by the automobile industry and its allies.Safety is at the heart of the debate over legislation calling for a 40 percent increase in the average car's fuel efficiency within 10 years.
NEWS
By Bill Talbott and Bill Talbott,Sun Staff Writer | July 16, 1995
Westminster police say a survey last month of motorists at four city intersections revealed that 78 percent of the drivers were wearing safety belts.Police said the survey found that 85 percent of female drivers wore their seat belts, compared with 72 percent of male drivers.The June figures indicate an increase for all drivers of 4 percent over May's seat belt use, officers said.The June survey also indicated that 71 percent of all truck drivers were wearing the safety devices, up from 55 percent.
NEWS
December 11, 2012
How is traffic safety improved by telling people that traveling 12 mph above the posted speed limit is acceptable? I suggest Increasing most speed limits by 10 mph instead. That would stop the practice of slowing down otherwise safe traffic flows simply for the purpose of raising revenue. Drivers obeying speed limits that are set too low cause accidents when other people are forced to change lanes trying to get around them. Dan Griffin, Perry Hall
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, Patuxent Publishing | June 24, 2010
President Barack Obama's traffic safety chief visited Towson on Thursday, praising Baltimore County police for their use of data to drive down traffic collisions and crime. David L. Strickland, chief of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, said the tactics employed by Baltimore County police are a model for agencies across the country — including the U.S. Department of Justice. "We're using Baltimore County as a gold standard," Strickland said. In 2009, Baltimore County became one of seven jurisdictions in the country to begin using a program called Data Driven Approaches to Crime and Traffic Safety — known as DDACTS.
NEWS
December 11, 2012
How is traffic safety improved by telling people that traveling 12 mph above the posted speed limit is acceptable? I suggest Increasing most speed limits by 10 mph instead. That would stop the practice of slowing down otherwise safe traffic flows simply for the purpose of raising revenue. Drivers obeying speed limits that are set too low cause accidents when other people are forced to change lanes trying to get around them. Dan Griffin, Perry Hall
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2012
A Glen Burnie man who was struck in a hit-and-run accident Tuesday has died, Anne Arundel County police said, the second pedestrian death in the county in a day. John Junior Stewart, 52, was walking on eastbound Mountain Road near Jumpers Hole Road in Glen Burnie when witnesses said a dark-colored van or SUV struck him shortly after 7 p.m., police said. The vehicle slowed to a stop just beyond the crash but then continued eastbound on Mountain Road without helping the victim, police said.
NEWS
September 15, 2012
It is most amusing to see the controversy surrounding speed cameras and the revenue they generate ("Speeding drivers get the blame," Sept. 13). I wonder what we tell our children sitting in the back seat. When they say, "Daddy, why are you speeding?" do we explain that "Daddy doesn't have to obey the laws," or do we say "Because almost everybody else is doing it too?" We claim to be a democratic country, and as such we elect officials to administer highway construction and safety enforcement on the public streets.
EXPLORE
July 18, 2011
An article in the July 17, 1936, edition of The Catonsville Herald and Baltimore Countian discouraged businesses from displaying their wares on the sidewalk. Arthur Shipley of Monumental Avenue, Lansdowne, died last Saturday, July 11, at St. Agnes' Hospital, due to injuries sustained when he was overcome by the heat and fell from a twenty-foot ladder striking, his head against a sign on the pavement at Peter's Garage, Frederick Avenue, Catonsville, where he was painting.
NEWS
February 1, 2011
Making roads and highways safer is a science, not a way for governments to balance their budgets. That doesn't mean that traffic safety can't be improved by issuing more tickets or increasing the accompanying fines but that how one goes about it makes all the difference. Case in point: red light cameras. Remember a decade or more ago, when the installation of cameras at accident-prone intersections was seen by some as a violation of the motoring public's constitutional right to privacy?
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, Patuxent Publishing | June 24, 2010
President Barack Obama's traffic safety chief visited Towson on Thursday, praising Baltimore County police for their use of data to drive down traffic collisions and crime. David L. Strickland, chief of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, said the tactics employed by Baltimore County police are a model for agencies across the country — including the U.S. Department of Justice. "We're using Baltimore County as a gold standard," Strickland said. In 2009, Baltimore County became one of seven jurisdictions in the country to begin using a program called Data Driven Approaches to Crime and Traffic Safety — known as DDACTS.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 18, 2000
WASHINGTON - An effort by federal safety regulators to improve crash tests of new cars by using a dummy of a small woman has run into a roadblock in the Senate because of auto industry objections. Sen. Barbara Boxer, a California Democrat who is barely 5 feet tall - is trying to rescue the proposed new tests, which would be prohibited by a little-noticed provision in the Senate's Transportation Department funding bill. "I am concerned that this ... would prevent the public from learning how new cars would perform in crashes involving occupants of all sizes," Boxer said.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 10, 2006
WASHINGTON --Cars are becoming safer, but the people who drive them are not, a study by an insurance industry research group has found. Without design changes that have made vehicles safer, including the growing prevalence of air bags, the death toll on U.S. roads would be higher by about 5,000 people annually, more than 11 percent of last year's total, according to the study. The reason, says the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, is that drunken-driving rates have not changed much in the 10 years studied, seat belt use has climbed only slowly and people are driving faster.
NEWS
April 23, 2010
The 2010 Maryland General Assembly Session was an incredible disappointment to many of us in the traffic safety community. While there were significant opportunities for legislators to make our roads safer, these were mainly wasted opportunities. As has been reported, the Ignition Interlock Bill died in the House Judiciary Committee. This important, life-saving legislation would have required anyone convicted of driving above the legal alcohol limit - .08 to have an ignition interlock system installed in their car. Here is where the disappointment begins.
NEWS
By Tyeesha Dixon and Tyeesha Dixon,SUN REPORTER | August 7, 2008
Howard County police will be recognized at a national conference this fall for having one of the best traffic safety programs in the country. The International Association of Chiefs of Police awarded the Howard County Police Department first-place honors for best overall traffic safety program of departments its size, which included 27 police departments of 201 to 500 sworn officers. The International Association of Chiefs of Police Law Enforcement Challenge "recognizes and rewards the best overall traffic safety programs in the United States."
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