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NEWS
June 23, 2011
I would love to introduce the writer today complaining about the incessant traffic backups on Interstate 95 to the writer whose letter published last weekend took great umbrage at the proposed increase in the tolls who feels that anything less than encouraging everyone to drive as much as possible would be catastrophic to the economy and a sound energy policy. Clearly both can't be true. You can't simultaneously alleviate traffic congestion and encourage universal car ownership as a birthright.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
Commuters entering Baltimore from the south on Monday morning found themselves in a massive traffic jam amid widespread confusion about how to navigate a new construction pattern, in part due to a failure by the Maryland Transportation Authority to update signage about the change. "It was way, way, way beyond anything I have seen," said Tamory Winfield, a MdTA spokesman, of the traffic problems on northbound Interstate 95. Crews are rushing to fix the issues before the afternoon rush hour, which will include a northbound influx of fans headed to tonight's Orioles game, he said.
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NEWS
January 18, 2014
As I've followed the news about the scandal surrounding New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, I am probably not alone in being moved by one of the stories that emerged from the release of emails among his staff. A woman had complained to The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey that her husband, who had been out of work for more than a year, was 40 minutes late to his first day at a new job because he was caught in the traffic jam on the George Washington Bridge. I wince thinking about that man watching the minutes tick by and knowing that his chances of making a positive impression on a long sought-after job were diminished.
NEWS
January 18, 2014
As I've followed the news about the scandal surrounding New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, I am probably not alone in being moved by one of the stories that emerged from the release of emails among his staff. A woman had complained to The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey that her husband, who had been out of work for more than a year, was 40 minutes late to his first day at a new job because he was caught in the traffic jam on the George Washington Bridge. I wince thinking about that man watching the minutes tick by and knowing that his chances of making a positive impression on a long sought-after job were diminished.
NEWS
By Peg Adamarczyk and Peg Adamarczyk,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 29, 1997
SCHOOL HAS reopened for another year and that means the Mountain Road traffic jams have returned.After living off Mountain Road for 20 years, I have learned to check the calendar and the clock before leaving.My theories are basic. Fewer traffic jams occur between mid-June, when schools close for summer, and late August, when classes start again. That's barring any bad accidents or outdoor community events, of course.Then I consult my watch. Northbound traffic is heavy between 6 a.m. and 9 a.m., no matter what the season.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen | December 25, 1991
For all those who have ever been stuck in their cars for hours inching around a rush-hour traffic accident, take heart: State officials are embarking on an ambitious, high-tech program to help you avoid such headaches.The project's goal is simple: to detect traffic tie-ups, clear them as soon as possible and relay information about the resulting traffic jams to motorists quickly so that they can avoid them."We're talking about putting together a system that should last us for several decades," said Hal Kassoff, head of the State Highway Administration.
NEWS
By Doug Birch | February 5, 1991
Motorists who find themselves swamped in traffic on the Jones Falls Expressway every weekday morning should thank their lucky stars. It could be a lot worse.A study by two researchers for the Texas Transportation Institute found that as of 1988, Baltimore had less traffic congestion than most other major U.S. cities, ranking 25th of 39 urban areas studied.Of the six Northeastern cities in the study, only Pittsburgh's roads were less snarled than Baltimore's. By comparison, researchers found that Washington, just a tie-up or two down Interstate 95, had the third-worst traffic problem in the nation.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | October 26, 2000
You're zipping down Interstate 95 when - bam - suddenly you're parked, the traffic stacked up before you for miles. A fender bender or construction, you figure. But when traffic thins, you find ... nothing. No wreck, no road crews, no clue to what triggered the jam. Finally, there are some answers to the baffling "phantom wreck" phenomenon and other mysteries of the highway. Using heavy-duty math and some of the world's most powerful computers, scientists in the little-known field of traffic theory are working to understand why roads clog and how to unclog them.
NEWS
By Charles V. Bagli and Charles V. Bagli,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 7, 2001
NEW YORK - City officials and construction executives are considering building concrete plants on the waterfront in Manhattan for the first time in more than a decade because traffic jams on bridges have stalled trucks' delivery of concrete to building sites and have idled hundreds of workers. The city is also considering providing police escorts to help clear the way for the 79,000-pound trucks as they rumble between concrete plants in Queens, Brooklyn and the Bronx and destinations at commercial and residential projects in Manhattan.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 24, 1999
WASHINGTON -- About 70 school kids from Baldwin, N.Y., were unable to take a White House tour yesterday because of the security surrounding NATO's 50th Anniversary Summit.So, instead, they found alternate entertainment: counting sharpshooters.A macabre way to experience the nation's capital, but perfectly in keeping with the mood at the start of the three-day NATO event.The anniversary gathering -- once billed as a celebration of the alliance -- felt more like a high-security war conference.
NEWS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2013
In the stop-and-go world of Baltimore-area traffic, there's a lot more braking than commuters and transportation officials would like. Take Russell Allen, a Federal Hill resident who gets in his silver Ford Edge every weekday morning before 7:30 and steers south toward Fort Meade and the region's biggest bottleneck: Baltimore-Washington Parkway and Route 175. The trip starts fine. But around Route 100, Allen's windshield relfects a dazzling array of red taillights. "And it stays that way until I get to work - four miles and 20 minutes later," said Allen, 52, who works for the Army.
NEWS
By Joe Burris and Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2013
Traffic Morning commute snarled by accidents, including two with injury Several accidents, including a fatal crash in Baltimore County, hampered Thursday morning's traffic, according to the state Department of Transportation. The morning commute became snarled at 5:41 a.m., due to a deadly accident involving three vehicles that closed all lanes and both shoulders of the Interstate 695 inner loop near Belair Road in the Overlea area of Baltimore County, DOT said. One adult was killed in the accident, and at least one adult and one child were injured and transported to area hospitals in critical condition, a Baltimore County Fire Department dispatcher confirmed.
NEWS
By The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2011
A semi-trailer that caught on fire is blocking two northbound lanes on I-95 just before Exit 64 to the Baltimore Beltway, Maryland State Police said Friday night. Traffic is moving in two lanes and a shoulder is open, police said. Traffic was backed up for several miles at 10:30 p.m. A tow truck was on the scene, police said. Authorities are encouraging drivers before Exit 49 to use I-695 as an alternate route. Drivers beyond Exit 49 should use U.S. 40 at Exit 61, authorities said.
NEWS
June 23, 2011
I would love to introduce the writer today complaining about the incessant traffic backups on Interstate 95 to the writer whose letter published last weekend took great umbrage at the proposed increase in the tolls who feels that anything less than encouraging everyone to drive as much as possible would be catastrophic to the economy and a sound energy policy. Clearly both can't be true. You can't simultaneously alleviate traffic congestion and encourage universal car ownership as a birthright.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | December 23, 2010
A huge traffic jam that stranded hundreds of holiday shoppers Thursday near an Abingdon strip mall in Harford County took more than two hours to clear, according to state police. The backup sparked a rash of complaints to area law enforcement and was the subject of calls to talk-radio programs in which some shoppers said they had been trapped on the lot for up to seven hours. State police Cpl. John Krysiak said seven hours was "a bit of an exaggeration," but some drivers might have had to wait up to two hours before getting out. "Everyone waited to go Christmas shopping at the last minute," Krysiak said.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2010
The problem: A railroad crossing near M&T Bank Stadium has been closed to traffic. The back story: Occasionally, Watchdog encounters a problem resulting from a solution proposed as an answer to an entirely different problem. Take, for example, this week's quandary. Richard Jordan works in a machine shop near the intersection of Ridgely Street and West Ostend Street, near the parking lots for M&T Bank Stadium and the elevated portion of Russell Street. For about a month and a half, Jordan, who commutes from Catonsville, said he has had to go at least 10 minutes out of his way because the railroad crossing on Ridgely Street between West Ostend and Alluvion streets has been closed.
NEWS
By Jeffrey Selingo and Jeffrey Selingo,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 3, 2002
WASHINGTON - Traffic is notoriously bad in and around the nation's capital; ask anyone who spends time on the roadways. The average driver in the Washington area wastes some 84 hours a year stuck in traffic, by one measure. Only drivers in San Francisco and Los Angeles have it worse. Now, traffic engineers using satellite technology have been able to identify exactly where and when the worst bottlenecks occur on heavily used secondary roads in the region, which carry about 60 percent of the area's traffic.
NEWS
October 27, 1997
THE NEXT TIME you sit in a traffic jam -- and plenty can be found around here -- consider this tidbit from researchers at Texas A&M University: Baltimore motorists spend an average 30 hours per year in such tie-ups.That's the latest conclusion of a 10-year study on gridlock in the Longhorn state and in 43 urban areas, Charm City included.Our traffic jams rank 21st in the nation when measured by the level of congestion -- a calculation involving traffic flow and mileage. It's a lofty equation that baffles your Intrepid One, a wordsmith often allergic to numbers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Coward and Kevin Coward,kevin.cowherd@baltsun.com | February 8, 2009
The last time I was at Arundel Mills, I was stuffing hunks of roasted chicken into my fat face and watching knights on horseback joust in front of a roaring crowd while a comely wench kept coming up to my table and saying: "More to drink, sire?" Oh, do I know how to live or what? This was last year at Medieval Times, where these feast-and-fighting extravaganzas are held in a replica of an 11th-century castle and tickets are $50.95 for adults, which doesn't exactly sound like a bargain in this economy.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and Laura McCandlish and David Nitkin and Laura McCandlish,Sun reporters | November 16, 2007
WASHINGTON -- With a holiday travel crush looming, President Bush announced yesterday that commercial jets will be allowed to fly in restricted East Coast military airspace during the busiest days around Thanksgiving and Christmas. The move will add two flight routes to the dozen or so along the Eastern seaboard and help get planes out of the crowded New York metropolitan area - the source of many of the nation's air traffic jams - more quickly, transportation officials said. While the restricted space is frequently available to commercial flights during bad weather, this marks the first time that authorities have cleared its use in advance.
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