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NEWS
November 23, 1998
HOT OFF THE PRESS: Clipboard-wielding traffic engineers from Baltimore County have rated the notorious crawl at Greenspring Valley and Falls roads and given the mess a "D."That's one rank below last year's "C," but the bureaucrats again stopped short of concluding that gridlock there -- and the nearby crossroads of Falls and Joppa roads -- constitutes a failed intersection.Many have argued for years that the location is traffic purgatory at rush hour.Your wheelster likens it to the extraordinary headache one encounters when leaving a major sporting event, sort of like what would happen to Baltimore's streets if a World Series were to occur at Camden Yards.
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NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2014
Are Howard County's speed limits too low or too high? That's one question some county officials hoped to answer when they reviewed a report of speed camera data from their vendor, Xerox State & Local Solutions. Traffic engineers have attempted for decades to set reasonable speed limits by analyzing traffic flow, setting the limit at the 85th percentile speed of vehicles on the road - meaning 15 percent of drivers travel faster than the limit. The thinking goes that drivers set a natural limit based on perceived risk.
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NEWS
By Dan Morse and Dan Morse,SUN STAFF | May 21, 1996
Do you hate clogged intersections? Detest traffic lights? Loathe left turns? In Howard County, traffic engineers have latched onto a novel solution: more lights, more turns.They have drawn up unusual plans for three congested intersections in east Columbia, touching off a revolt by residents who fear they are about to become commuting guinea pigs.The rare intersection design -- millions of dollars cheaper than traditional cloverleaf interchanges -- involves a complex series of carefully timed traffic lights and left-turn lanes.
NEWS
By Phillip McGowan and Phillip McGowan,SUN STAFF | March 27, 2005
From his office, Douglas D. Tzan could turn right on Friendship Road and drive a quarter-mile to get on Route 2. Instead he turns left and drives up to three miles to get on the road at other points. "Personally, I don't use that way around," Tzan said of the junction of Friendship Road and Route 2 in Friendship. The pastor of the Friendship United Methodist Church has his reasons: Friendship Road and Route 2 is considered one of the most dangerous intersections in Anne Arundel County, and he doesn't want to risk being the next person killed in a high-speed crash.
NEWS
February 8, 1992
What is it about signs for the new ballpark that causes otherwise intelligent people to go bonkers? Bad enough that the naming process was a silly exercise in egomania. Then there came a tug of war over the size of each precious word gracing the main entrance. Now we have two of the city's top elected officials behaving like children whose mother has briefly left them alone with the cookie jar. Plus city traffic engineers who panic when someone notices the ballpark's whole jawbreaking name is not on a temporary highway sign.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Staff Writer | December 18, 1992
The State Highway Administration has decided to set up a temporary traffic circle in a western Howard County village to see if motorists are willing to accept Maryland's first "roundabout."The agency had proposed building a permanent roundabout at the intersection of Old National Pike (Route 144) and Route 94 in Lisbon in October. But the proposal drew substantial criticism from the community.In particular, some local residents objected to the idea that they were being used as part of an experiment by traffic engineers.
NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF | February 25, 1997
In an attempt to slow traffic in Columbia's Kings Contrivance village, county traffic engineers will install roundabouts, turn lanes and road striping on Shaker Drive in the next few months.At a village board meeting last week, county traffic engineers and Howard County Councilman Dennis R. Schrader -- a North Laurel Republican who has spearheaded the traffic-calming efforts -- presented a preliminary plan to board members and residents, said Diane Wilson, Schrader's assistant.The changes come after years of complaints from residents that drivers often exceed the area's speed limits of 25 and 30 mph, endangering pedestrians and other drivers, said Anne Dodd, village manager.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | August 21, 2003
Baltimore's 23-year-old stoplight system is getting a $21 million upgrade that will gradually improve traffic flow, city Transportation Department officials announced this week. More than 900 of the city's 1,210 stoplights are operated by a computer system that was installed in 1976 and has lasted 10 years longer than it was supposed to, according to city traffic engineers. Another 288 stoplights are essentially lone soldiers, run by control boxes that can't communicate with the computer system, said Richard Baker, a Transportation Department engineering supervisor.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Staff Writer | December 18, 1992
The State Highway Administration has decided to set up a temporary traffic circle in a western Howard County village to see if motorists are willing to accept Maryland's first "roundabout."The agency had proposed building a permanent roundabout at the intersection of Old National Pike (Route 144) and Route 94 in Lisbon in October. But the proposal drew substantial criticism from the community.In particular, some local residents objected to the idea that they were being used as part of an experiment by traffic engineers.
NEWS
By TaNoah V. Sterling and TaNoah V. Sterling,Sun Staff Writer | May 5, 1995
The road construction on Catherine and Outing avenues that has provided sidewalks for pedestrians and changed traffic patterns on the Pasadena roads also has slowed traffic in the Green Haven neighborhood, according to a county official.Traffic radar studies released this week by the county Division of Traffic Engineering show that speeds on Catherine and Outing avenues have slowed by as much as 10 mph in the morning.County officials and community representatives say the reduction is a significant improvement.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | August 21, 2003
Baltimore's 23-year-old stoplight system is getting a $21 million upgrade that will gradually improve traffic flow, city Transportation Department officials announced this week. More than 900 of the city's 1,210 stoplights are operated by a computer system that was installed in 1976 and has lasted 10 years longer than it was supposed to, according to city traffic engineers. Another 288 stoplights are essentially lone soldiers, run by control boxes that can't communicate with the computer system, said Richard Baker, a Transportation Department engineering supervisor.
NEWS
By Jeffrey Selingo and Jeffrey Selingo,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 3, 2002
WASHINGTON - Traffic is notoriously bad in and around the nation's capital; ask anyone who spends time on the roadways. The average driver in the Washington area wastes some 84 hours a year stuck in traffic, by one measure. Only drivers in San Francisco and Los Angeles have it worse. Now, traffic engineers using satellite technology have been able to identify exactly where and when the worst bottlenecks occur on heavily used secondary roads in the region, which carry about 60 percent of the area's traffic.
NEWS
November 23, 1998
HOT OFF THE PRESS: Clipboard-wielding traffic engineers from Baltimore County have rated the notorious crawl at Greenspring Valley and Falls roads and given the mess a "D."That's one rank below last year's "C," but the bureaucrats again stopped short of concluding that gridlock there -- and the nearby crossroads of Falls and Joppa roads -- constitutes a failed intersection.Many have argued for years that the location is traffic purgatory at rush hour.Your wheelster likens it to the extraordinary headache one encounters when leaving a major sporting event, sort of like what would happen to Baltimore's streets if a World Series were to occur at Camden Yards.
FEATURES
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,SUN STAFF | September 7, 1998
There you are, the whole family in tow, zipping around the beltway in the minivan, coming back from the long Labor Day weekend. You're making good time as the needle on the speedometer edges past the 65-mph mark.Then it happens. A river of red brake lights glows up front and you're forced to rein in the horses under that minivan's hood to a slow trot. You can almost see the pity on the faces of drivers heading the opposite way.You creep along for miles, wondering what in the world would cause such a backup.
NEWS
April 13, 1998
SOME DRIVERS brace every time they head onto the ramps from eastbound Route 175 to northbound U.S. 29 in Columbia."These ramps become absolutely treacherous, presenting unwary drivers with surfaces which, on the slickness scale, lie somewhere between black ice and an oil spill," writes William G. Dorsey Jr. of Ellicott City. "Repaving of these ramps must be done soon, before additional destruction and possibly worse occur at this interchange."Dorsey says he experienced a "minor" spinout on the Route 175 ramp in November.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | January 30, 1998
Residents concerned about a proposed senior citizen complex in Glenwood questioned the developer's traffic engineer about possible dangers posed by the project's intersection with Route 97 during a public hearing last night.But traffic engineer Mickey Cornelius, vice president of The Traffic Group, said the intersection of a new road connecting the 116-unit condominium development and Route 97 will be safe and well within state and county guidelines.Developer Donald Reuwer is seeking a special exception to build the complex on 58 acres near Cattail Creek Country Club.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Staff Writer | January 7, 1994
The Washington Redskins plan to announce today the formation of a citizen advisory committee to help team officials communicate with local residents and incorporate their concerns into plans for the proposed 78,600-seat stadium in Laurel.Team officials said last night that three co-chairmen have been selected to represent Anne Arundel, Howard and Prince George's counties, who will be given free rein to set up meetings and advise the professional football franchise.Bob DiPietro, the co-chairman from Prince George's who has been working with the Redskins for several weeks, said the group will "ensure that all of the concerns and all of the benefits of this proposal are addressed in a responsible way."
NEWS
By Robert Lee and Robert Lee,Staff writer Staff writer | February 22, 1991
Philip and Alice Dibben were shocked when the state highway surveyorcame by last month and told them they would have to sell two acres of their small farm on Long Point to make way for a wider Mountain Road."
NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF | February 25, 1997
In an attempt to slow traffic in Columbia's Kings Contrivance village, county traffic engineers will install roundabouts, turn lanes and road striping on Shaker Drive in the next few months.At a village board meeting last week, county traffic engineers and Howard County Councilman Dennis R. Schrader -- a North Laurel Republican who has spearheaded the traffic-calming efforts -- presented a preliminary plan to board members and residents, said Diane Wilson, Schrader's assistant.The changes come after years of complaints from residents that drivers often exceed the area's speed limits of 25 and 30 mph, endangering pedestrians and other drivers, said Anne Dodd, village manager.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,SUN STAFF | June 7, 1996
County traffic engineers project that short-term road improvements being considered to relieve traffic along Route 175 and Snowden River Parkway could themselves reach saturation by 2005.The reason, they said at a traffic task force meeting Wednesday night, is increased traffic projected from nearby Route 100, which is due to open to the northeast in 1999."The wild card is Maryland 100 -- how it affects the whole mix," said Ronald G. Lepson, chief of the Howard County bureau of engineering and co-chairman of the task force set up to weigh traffic solutions at Snowden River-Route 175 and at nearby Dobbin Road and Route 175.Said co-chairman Gene Straub, a State Highway Administration engineer: "It's a little bit iffy."
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