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NEWS
December 7, 2012
One would think that after decades of population flight from Baltimore and the city struggling with a property tax rate over double that of the next highest municipality, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake would be highly sensitive regarding the levy of new taxes or fees. The investigation by The Sun found that for the 2012 fiscal year, Baltimore issued just under 700,000 speed camera tickets, at $40 each, generating total fines just shy of $28 million. It also found that there have been 2.5 million photo enforcement tickets issued, for a total of $100 million in fines ("Delays, detours and dead ends on cameras," Nov. 25)
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NEWS
June 27, 2013
As a 33-year Maryland law enforcement veteran, I agree with 95 percent of what Baltimore City State's Attorney Gregg Bernstein says about the difficulty of decriminalizing marijuana ("Perils of decriminalization," June 21). A move to decriminalize marijuana would leave behind the deadly drug-dealing marketplace of Baltimore's street corners. Most people do not realize that alcohol prohibition was the decriminalization of alcohol. It was only illegal to manufacture, transport and sell, not to possess or consume.
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NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,Sun reporter | November 9, 2007
Described as a hard-working police officer and a true team player, Cpl. Eric Trumbauer lived up to the humble billing . After being named Officer of the Year by the Northern District Police Community Relations Council Wednesday night and receiving accolades from the Police Department's top leaders, it was Trumbauer's turn to speak. "Thanks everyone," he said. With that, he waved and left with his wife and newborn child. Community leaders and police officials applauded Trumbauer's work during the past year, notably his aggressive traffic enforcement and quick-thinking.
NEWS
By Ragina Cooper Averella | March 4, 2013
With rampant abuses of automated speed enforcement camera systems across the state well-documented by the news media and AAA Mid-Atlantic, the House Environmental Matters Committee on Tuesday is poised to review a series of bills to fix a broken system. AAA Mid-Atlantic worked with the legislature in 2005 to launch Maryland's first automated speed enforcement program in residential areas and school zones in Montgomery County. Again in 2009, we were before the legislature supporting the expansion of automated speed enforcement camera systems statewide for use in work and school zones.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | June 29, 1998
Like most people, Mark Carter doesn't like getting pulled over by police. So he was not exactly happy when he got caught speeding down Russell Street, clocked at 22 mph over the 35-mph limit.But Carter and his red Buick are now part of Baltimore history. At 11: 34 a.m. Friday, the 45-year-old Northeast Baltimore man became the first person stopped by a city officer driving a new, sporty Ford Mustang dressed up as a cruiser."I just put a down payment on a Mustang myself," a bemused Carter told Officer Brian S. Weber, who let him off with a warning.
NEWS
June 2, 2012
Sometimes the simplest solution to a problem is the most elusive. I'm no expert on police deployment, but it seems to make sense that reassigning patrolling officers to higher-crime areas would be a good first step in protecting the city and its citizens. One example of this plan should be an immediate cutback of traffic enforcement after dark when the need is far less, and redeploying these traffic officers into high-risk crime areas and undermanned tourist areas as foot patrolmen.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | September 20, 1998
NOW HERE'S AN idea that just might work. Even if it doesn't, it's worth a try. At best we may cut Baltimore's homicide rate and remove some dangerous criminals from our streets. At worst we may get better driving.The idea comes from Mayor Kurt Schmoke, via Cleveland. Baltimore police will now nail those who violate traffic laws in the hopes of shaking loose drugs and illegal weapons. Cleveland adopted the policy of aggressive traffic enforcement. Its homicide rate dropped. The traffic enforcement program was one of many factors.
NEWS
May 21, 1993
If behavior in traffic reflects overall conduct in American society, things are rapidly getting out of hand. Most motorists seem to think nothing of running a yellow light and an increasing number of motorists tailgate other vehicles that are rushing through red ones. The bloody consequences are described every day in newspapers and on television news. A Columbia woman was killed and her 12-year-old son badly injured when a dump truck ran a red light last month.The Howard County Police Department is now trying to put a stop to this anarchy.
NEWS
By Nancy A. Youssef and Nancy A. Youssef,SUN STAFF | September 26, 2000
Hiring more traffic officers, not dispersing the ones on staff among the county's eight police precincts, is the most effective way to bolster traffic enforcement, a Baltimore County councilman has suggested. Councilman T. Bryan McIntire's suggestion came in reaction to a recent proposal by police Chief Terrence B. Sheridan to restructure the department's traffic unit. "I think the Baltimore County Police Department is one of the finest in the country. I also feel that traffic enforcement is the weakest link," said McIntire, a Republican who represents Owings Mills and the north county.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2012
Whose traffic camera system is bigger? D.C. or Baltimore's? In the Baltimore Sun's speed camera investigation published Sunday, Xerox State & Local Solutions, Baltimore's speed camera vendor, called the city's automated traffic enforcement system the largest in North America. That figure included both red light and speed cameras. The next morning, the mayor's office challenged that claim and sent out a news release comparing Baltimore's cameras with the District's. It did not send the release to the Sun reporters who had authored the article.
NEWS
December 7, 2012
One would think that after decades of population flight from Baltimore and the city struggling with a property tax rate over double that of the next highest municipality, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake would be highly sensitive regarding the levy of new taxes or fees. The investigation by The Sun found that for the 2012 fiscal year, Baltimore issued just under 700,000 speed camera tickets, at $40 each, generating total fines just shy of $28 million. It also found that there have been 2.5 million photo enforcement tickets issued, for a total of $100 million in fines ("Delays, detours and dead ends on cameras," Nov. 25)
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2012
Whose traffic camera system is bigger? D.C. or Baltimore's? In the Baltimore Sun's speed camera investigation published Sunday, Xerox State & Local Solutions, Baltimore's speed camera vendor, called the city's automated traffic enforcement system the largest in North America. That figure included both red light and speed cameras. The next morning, the mayor's office challenged that claim and sent out a news release comparing Baltimore's cameras with the District's. It did not send the release to the Sun reporters who had authored the article.
NEWS
June 2, 2012
Sometimes the simplest solution to a problem is the most elusive. I'm no expert on police deployment, but it seems to make sense that reassigning patrolling officers to higher-crime areas would be a good first step in protecting the city and its citizens. One example of this plan should be an immediate cutback of traffic enforcement after dark when the need is far less, and redeploying these traffic officers into high-risk crime areas and undermanned tourist areas as foot patrolmen.
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AEGIS STAFF REPORT | December 22, 2011
Local law enforcement agencies say they will be concentrating on traffic enforcement in Harford County over the Christmas to New Year holiday period and into 2012, particularly in what are considered high crash areas. Out of concern for Harford's high fatal accident rate, police say they will be cracking down on a number of dangerous driving offenses, including speeding, following too closely and distracted and impaired driving. "Distracted and impaired driving can have dangerous and life altering consequences," Harford Sheriff Jesse Bane said in a recent news release.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun reporter | July 10, 2008
If you've been noticing a heavier police presence on major highways in Baltimore County, it's no accident. As part of a pilot project being watched by state and federal officials, the county Police Department is stepping up enforcement of traffic laws in corridors with high rates of crime and crashes. Since March, the county has increased patrols in six such corridors - Liberty Road, Baltimore National Pike (U.S. 40 west), Reisterstown Road, York Road, Eastern Avenue and Bel Air Road (U.S.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,Sun reporter | November 9, 2007
Described as a hard-working police officer and a true team player, Cpl. Eric Trumbauer lived up to the humble billing . After being named Officer of the Year by the Northern District Police Community Relations Council Wednesday night and receiving accolades from the Police Department's top leaders, it was Trumbauer's turn to speak. "Thanks everyone," he said. With that, he waved and left with his wife and newborn child. Community leaders and police officials applauded Trumbauer's work during the past year, notably his aggressive traffic enforcement and quick-thinking.
EXPLORE
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | December 22, 2011
Local law enforcement agencies say they will be concentrating on traffic enforcement in Harford County over the Christmas to New Year holiday period and into 2012, particularly in what are considered high crash areas. Out of concern for Harford's high fatal accident rate, police say they will be cracking down on a number of dangerous driving offenses, including speeding, following too closely and distracted and impaired driving. "Distracted and impaired driving can have dangerous and life altering consequences," Harford Sheriff Jesse Bane said in a recent news release.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Staff Writer | May 19, 1993
When they're not looking at traffic reports, Sgt. Glenn A Hansen's hazel eyes serve as the county's binoculars for spotting motorists who run red lights.On April 1, he and other officers began staking out the county's most dangerous intersections in search of red light runners.When the officers spot a vehicle running a light, they radio its description to a patrol officer down the street who then nabs the motorist and writes a $50 citation."The whole concept is to try and reduce the number of collisions we have in the county," said Sergeant Hansen, supervisor of the department's traffic enforcement section.
NEWS
July 22, 2007
I read Police Chief Willliam McMahon's "open" letter to the public (The Sun, July 15) about better driving. Very nice, but I really wasn't impressed. I'll tell you why. I lived in Montgomery County for 15 years. Only had 1 point on my license since 1983. After 2001 (and 9/11), I couldn't get a job anywhere in the D.C. area because I didn't have a security clearance. So I went back home to New Jersey. In June of 2004, I was hit by a drunken motorcyclist. He slammed into my car doing about 65 mph. He died about a week later.
NEWS
June 26, 2007
`Stepping out' suspended after death of Howard officer After the death of Cpl. Scott Wheeler during a traffic enforcement detail, Howard County police yesterday suspended the practice of officers stepping into traffic to flag down speeders on roads with speed limits higher than 35 mph. The partial suspension of "stop teams," in which one officer operates radar while others pull over cars, will last until Police Chief William J. McMahon completes a...
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