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By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2012
Twelve massive windows in the air traffic control tower at Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport have been replaced after 30 years, an airport official said Thursday. Each of the new windows weighs about 850 pounds and measures more than eight feet wide and eight feet tall, according to a statement from Jonathan Dean, a spokesman for the airport. All of the windows are 1.5 inches thick, he said. The windows meet standards for strength, transparency, glare reduction and wind resistance, he said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 29, 2013
The average air traffic controller works 230 days a year and does a flawless job ("Sequester disrupts airline passengers," April 23). There have been no major airlines crashes in nearly a decade. The average member of Congress, on the other hand, works barely 120 days a year and doesn't do his or her job at all. There have been no proper federal budgets passed in recent years, and as a result we now have the "sequester. " Which raises an interesting question: Why have the sequester-mandated cuts ended up laying off the air traffic controllers, who do their jobs, instead of members of Congress, who don't?
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NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | February 5, 1993
All his life Mike Finucane had worked hard and played by the rules.He graduated from high school, went into the Air Force, learned a good trade, got out and became an air traffic controller at O'Hare Airport in Chicago."
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2013
The Federal Aviation Administration announced Friday afternoon that it will delay the closure of all 149 federal contract air traffic control towers - including five in Maryland - until June 15. The announcement came just two days before the first of the towers was scheduled to be shuttered as part of across-the-board federal budget cuts approved by Congress. The FAA is required to cut $637 million from its $16 billion budget by the end of the fiscal year on Sept. 30. The extension will allow the agency to deal with multiple lawsuits, continue consulting with airports and review safety issues, the FAA said in its statement.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Staff Writer | August 14, 1993
Yesterday, for the first time in 12 years, Dennis Callaghan was no longer exiled from the job he loved most -- directing jetliners to safe landings at the nation's biggest airports.But the move to lift a federal employment ban against the former Professional Air Traffic Controllers Organization (PATCO) members was too long in coming for Mr. Callaghan, who lives in Dorchester County."Even murderers get out in seven years," said Mr. Callaghan, an air traffic controller at BWI and Washington's National Airport before he was fired for striking illegally in 1981.
BUSINESS
By MEREDITH COHN and MEREDITH COHN,SUN REPORTER | May 16, 2006
A dispute between the federal government and air traffic controllers, many of whom arrived a quarter-century ago after President Reagan fired their predecessors in a pivotal showdown with organized labor, spilled into public view yesterday. At airports around the country, including Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport, controllers handed out leaflets to passengers to present their side of an argument over a proposed five-year contract with the Federal Aviation Administration.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | May 17, 2003
Most of the air traffic controllers who monitor the 700 daily takeoffs and landings at Baltimore-Washington International Airport have moved to Virginia, where federal aviation officials say it will actually be easier for them to do their jobs. Last month, the Federal Aviation Administration transferred 40 controllers from BWI to a new center in Warrenton, Va., in the midst of horse country, as part of a plan to consolidate the air traffic control functions from five airports into one place to help them work more efficiently.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 11, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The Clinton administration has decided to invite air traffic controllers dismissed in their 1981 strike to reapply for their former jobs, according to administration and congressional officials.The controllers, barred from re-employment by President Ronald Reagan, would be allowed to seek reinstatement after the administration decides how many are needed, what criteria to use in their rehiring and what retraining they would require.The plan to send the ousted controllers back to their jobs is being developed jointly by the departments of Labor and Transportation and the Office of Personnel Management.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,Sun reporter | December 8, 2007
Two planes nearly collided at Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport this week as one aircraft took off just above another that had landed, federal officials said. The National Transportation Safety Board is investigating the near-collision, which occurred at the intersection of two runways at 7:20 p.m. Sunday. The investigation of the "runway incursion" is focusing on possible mistakes by air traffic controllers in the tower, not pilot error, said a spokesman with the Federal Aviation Administration.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | July 16, 2003
A preliminary report by the National Transportation Safety Board on a small plane crash in White Marsh two weeks ago supports the pilot's contention that he crashed into a wooded area because the plane ran out of fuel. The report, released yesterday, found no mechanical problems with the Cessna that crashed June 29. Three people in the plane, including pilot Dale P. Roger, suffered minor injuries. The NTSB has not reached a final conclusion on the cause of the crash, but the agency's report chronicles the problems Roger had in getting approval from air traffic controllers to land at Martin State Airport.
NEWS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2013
The Federal Aviation Administration on Wednesday released the closure dates for 149 air traffic control towers - including five in Maryland - affected by federal budget cuts. Martin State Airport in Baltimore County, Frederick Municipal Airport and Easton/Newnam Field in Easton will close on April 21. Hagerstown Regional Airport and Salisbury- Ocean City Wicomico Airport will close on May 5. In a memo to affected airports, the FAA outlined two options for the operator: Continue as a non-towered airport, relying on pilots to communicate takeoffs and landings on a common frequency, or provide and pay for tower services.
NEWS
February 13, 2013
The Ravens worked hard for their championship win, but the city just got lucky with its victory events. That "only" one person was stabbed and "only" two were non-lethally trampled - with an extra 200,000 excited people downtown last Tuesday - is more a testament to goodwill than to good planning ("Police believe stabbing victim was downtown for parade," Feb. 6). There were major problems with mass transit and traffic (before, during, and after the event), and people jumped barricades into the parade.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2012
Twelve massive windows in the air traffic control tower at Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport have been replaced after 30 years, an airport official said Thursday. Each of the new windows weighs about 850 pounds and measures more than eight feet wide and eight feet tall, according to a statement from Jonathan Dean, a spokesman for the airport. All of the windows are 1.5 inches thick, he said. The windows meet standards for strength, transparency, glare reduction and wind resistance, he said.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2012
Donald LeRoy Calp, a retired air-traffic control engineer, died of an acute pulmonary hemorrhage Jan. 17 at his Columbia home. He was 79. Born in Manchester, he was a 1950 Sparks High School graduate. He also attended Edison Junior College in Fort Myers, Fla. Mr. Calp served in the Air Force during the Korean War. After he left military service in 1957, he joined the Bendix Field Engineering Corp., where he worked for nearly 40 years. He traveled to Korea, Iceland, Cuba, Florida, Australia, Madagascar, Alaska and Saudi Arabia before he returned to Maryland in 1975.
NEWS
March 27, 2011
I wonder if the negligence of the air traffic controller suspended for sleeping on the job is not a delayed consequence of Ronald Reagan's busting of the air traffic controllers union 30 years ago("Sleeping controller suspended," March 25). Why was the controller working four consecutive overnight shifts? Did he have a choice? These questions are especially pertinent now during a concerted attack on collective bargaining, which protects both workers and the public they serve. John G. Bailey, Edgemere
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2010
William Earl Moritz Jr., a retired air traffic controller who was in the control tower the day what is now Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport opened in 1950, died Sunday of congestive heart failure at Carroll Lutheran Village. He was 90. Mr. Moritz, the son of a pharmacist and a homemaker, was born in Baltimore and raised on South Calhoun Street in Pigtown. After graduating from City College in 1938, he enrolled at the Federal Aviation Administration Training Academy in Oklahoma City, Okla.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | August 28, 2002
A miscommunication resulted in two military jets intercepting a US Airways flight yesterday morning and escorting it to a landing at Baltimore-Washing ton International Airport, authorities said. The aircraft landed at a remote section of the airport at 9:30 a.m. and was met by state and federal law enforcement and aviation officials who determined no safety threat was on board the flight carrying 45 passengers and a crew of five. Passengers were permitted to leave the plane about 11 a.m., airport officials said.
NEWS
By MICHAEL K. BURNS | August 4, 1991
A decade after President Ronald Reagan fired 11,400 striking members of the Professional Air Traffic Controllers Organization (PATCO) and abolished their union, a new generation of controllers is on board, represented by a new union and voicing the same kind of complaints about under-staffing, overwork, antiquated equipment and sagging morale.But members of the new National Air Traffic Controllers Association (NATCA) will not strike over these issues, insists union president R. Steve Bell, who credits the Federal Aviation Administration with taking some steps to improve control of the increasingly crowded skies and to listen to employee grievances.
NEWS
By The Washington Post | August 31, 2010
On-board systems intended to keep airliners from colliding in midair have been triggered more than 45 times this year in the skies over the Washington area as the air traffic controllers who guide planes to and from the region's airports have made dangerous mistakes at a record-setting pace. Two of the closest calls this month involved four airplanes carrying a total of 589 people, including one in which a Delta 737 was turned into the potentially deadly turbulent wake of a United 757 as the two planes flew along the Potomac on final approaches to Reagan National Airport.
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