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Traffic Congestion

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NEWS
By Brian Sullam | January 26, 1997
TRAFFIC CONGESTION is becoming the bane of the suburbs.Virtually any development proposed in Anne Arundel County generates complaints that it will aggravate traffic.Whether it is the Riverdale Baptist Church, with its planned 1,500-seat sanctuary, in Davidsonville or an athletic complex in Lake Shore, with two ice-skating rinks and an indoor soccer arena, the prospect of more automobile traffic elicits immediate and loud protests.Suburbs and automobiles are inextricably linked. Except for a few communities that developed around old rail lines, most suburbs today have only one transportation option: cars.
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NEWS
By Alexander E. Hooke | September 1, 2014
Ask some neighbors or colleagues about their Labor Day weekend tomorrow, and prepare to hear how busy it was. Several malls featured back to school sales, kids had a baseball tournament, lots of e-mails to catch up with at work, and the house needed some cleaning. We're too busy, goes the lament, to enjoy free time. Yet social scientists claim that the average work week for full-time employees since 1970 has fluctuated between 39 and 41 hours. This claim does include a range of variations.
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NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | April 1, 2000
Increased gasoline prices and ever-worsening traffic congestion appear to be boosting the use of public transit. Since June, ridership on Maryland Rail Commuter trains is up 5 percent to 6 percent, and Metro subway and light rail ridership is up 3 percent, according to the Mass Transit Administration. The biggest change has been in the use of Washington commuter buses. The eight bus lines, which travel from points including Hagerstown, Columbia and Kent Island, are carrying 13 percent more riders.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector and Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2014
Opening night at Horseshoe Casino Baltimore went off without a major hitch despite larger-than-expected crowds, long lines and some early jitters, casino and city officials said Wednesday. About 15,000 people visited the casino Tuesday night, said general manager Chad Barnhill. Officials had only expected about 10,000, and lines stretched around the building from well before the casino's 9 p.m. opening until well after. "I think it's pent-up demand," Barnhill said. "We had everybody in the doors shortly after midnight.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | May 8, 2001
If getting around Baltimore seems harder these days, there's a reason. The average person here spends 31 hours a year stuck in traffic and $530 in wasted fuel and other expenses, according to a national study released yesterday, which finds that congestion is costly and getting worse. The Texas Transportation Institute, in an annual report on congestion in 68 urban areas, calculates that the average American logged 36 hours in stalled or slow-moving traffic in 1999, up from 11 hours in 1982.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | March 9, 2000
A proposal to build a school addition to Bethel Assembly Church of God in Savage has some residents worried about possible traffic congestion. The church has applied for a special exception for a 350-pupil school to be housed in a 12,000-square-foot education wing being built onto the church. About 80 people attended a town meeting this week to learn more about the church's plans for a pre-kindergarten through 12 school attached to the church in the 9000 block of Vollmerhausen Road. Some residents questioned whether the intersection of Savage Guilford Road and Vollmerhausen would be able to handle an increase in traffic because of a new school.
NEWS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,SUN STAFF | October 3, 2000
Traffic and religion might seem like strange bedfellows, but in Savage they are at the heart of a growing struggle between a church and a community. Bethel Assembly Church of God asked Howard County for permission early this year to change the zoning for one of its school buildings that was under construction. The zoning change would allow more students, and to neighborhood residents that would mean more traffic congestion on the heavily traveled Savage-Guilford Road. The unfinished building sits empty in the 9000 block of Vollmerhausen Road but is zoned for up to 100 high school students.
NEWS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,SUN STAFF | October 3, 2000
Traffic and religion might seem like strange bedfellows, but in Savage, they are at the heart of a growing struggle between a church and a community. Bethel Assembly Church of God asked Howard County for permission early this year to change the zoning for one of its school buildings that was under construction. The zoning change would allow more students, and to neighborhood residents that would mean more traffic congestion on the heavily traveled Savage-Guilford Road. The unfinished building sits empty in the 9000 block of Vollmerhausen Road but is zoned for up to 100 high school students.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2010
Annapolis drivers and pedestrians can expect traffic congestion Monday around St. John's College, as police and fire departments conduct an emergency exercise on the campus. People can expect see emergency equipment, including ambulances and police vehicles, for the exercise that starts at 9 a.m. and runs for several hours. The nature of the exercise is not being disclosed. This will be the second mock emergency response drill in the area in a week. On Tuesday, Anne Arundel County police and other agencies spent half a day at Downs Park in Pasadena for a mock search and rescue for three missing adults who had dementia.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | July 9, 2009
Baltimore-area travelers remained stuck in traffic even as congestion eased elsewhere in the months leading up to the recession, a new analysis reveals. A jump in fuel prices triggered a slight reduction in backups in most metropolitan areas in 2007, according to a report released Wednesday by the Texas Transportation Institute, which has tracked urban "mobility" since the 1980s. Travelers spent an hour less in traffic than they did the year before and wasted a gallon less gasoline, the think tank found - not much relief, perhaps, but the first break in 25 years of near-constant increases in gridlock.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2014
Four traffic lanes on northbound Interstate 95 between the Caton Avenue on-ramp and Fort McHenry Tunnel will split around a work zone. One lane will be directed to the left and three others to the right, according to the Maryland Transportation Authority. Travelers in the left lane will not be able to access the exits for Russell Street, northbound Interstate 395, Hanover Street and Key Highway. Stay right to use exits. The work is part of a $66 million project to replace the existing concrete riding surface and roadway joints on I-95 and the ramps serving it in Baltimore City.
NEWS
Letter to The Aegis | August 29, 2013
Editor: Recently, the traffic company representing the proposed new Bel Air Walmart responded to the latest Harford County deficiencies of June 7, 2013. They continue to ask that the county approve the site plan. If this group was capable of providing acceptable traffic mitigation plans, one would think they would have already supplied them as requested. It is becoming increasingly apparent that traffic mitigation at the intersections of Routes 924 and 24 with Plumtree Road, Bel Air South Parkway, Wheel Road, Bright Oaks Road, Patterson Mill Road and the proposed Blue Spruce Road is not feasible or possible without compromising the safety of the public and the roadways.
NEWS
June 7, 2013
The commentary "Put people ahead of cars" (June 5) was very stimulating and well written. I have been saying something similar for years. I do believe the focus is a little misdirected. While all the author's points are valid, and I have great respect to for them, I think it might be a little off. The auto is isn't going away. The percentage of people interested in biking to work is very small. The focus of the piece is to put infrastructure to accommodate transit, biking and walking where the people are. I would suggest we might be better by turning that equation upside down and putting people where the infrastructure and population centers already exist.
EXPLORE
March 19, 2013
In last week's issue of the Laurel Leader it was reported that State Sen. Jim Rosapepe would support Gov. Martin O'Malley's comprehensive transportation proposal, which includes a substantial increase in the gas tax. Big surprise there, folks. Jim Rosapepe never met a tax increase or a government program he didn't slobber over. And he never passes up an opportunity to suck up to Martin O'Malley. With gasoline prices hovering at the $4 a gallon level, Maryland motorists can ill afford to pony up even more.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley and the Democratic leaders of the General Assembly are proposing to raise taxes on gasoline by $2 billion over five years to pay for highways, transit and other transportation projects. The legislation endorsed by the governor, Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller and House Speaker Michael E. Busch is a complex plan that would add 2 cents to the cost of a gallon of gas July 1 and another 7 cents a year later. In 2015, it would rise by another 7 cents unless Congress passes a bill to allow states to impose the sales tax on Internet purchases.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley told the Maryland Senate Monday night that if George Washington were to return to the State House in Annapolis, he would warn Americans against a "spirit of hedonism" imperiling the gains of the American Revolution. Delivering the annual George Washington's Birthday address to senators, O'Malley says a returned Washington would challenge Americans to return to "first principles" and put the common good above personal gain. It was the first time O'Malley has delivered the annual speech, which is typically given by a legislator.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | April 26, 2000
Traffic congestion in Eldersburg, where motorists often must wait through three lights to cross the intersection of Routes 26 and 32, might become worse next summer when a $30 million shopping mecca opens in Carroll County's most populous area. Eldersburg Marketplace, a proposed 36-acre retail center that has pitted developers against homeowners, won approval yesterday from the county Board of Zoning Appeals. During more than four hours of testimony, a handful of residents and the owner of a South Carroll hardware store opposed the development, planned for Route 32 and Londontown Boulevard.
TOPIC
By Alfred W. Barry III and Matthew Weinstein | August 6, 2000
RECENTLY, a local think tank, the Calvert Institute, began a curious campaign against the set of policy ideas generally grouped together under the framework of "regionalism." Curious because rather than following a normal method of investigative research, such as comparing Baltimore to other metropolitan areas and evaluating the impacts of greater or lesser degrees of metropolitan regional cooperation, it chose to use the release of a largely unrelated study as an opportunity to criticize regionalism.
EXPLORE
Letter to The Aegis | August 2, 2012
Walmart is proposing to relocate their Abingdon store in Constant Friendship Business Park to near Bel Air at the corner of Emmorton Road (route 924) and Plumtree Road. One of the reasons that has been put forth is a restriction on the land they own at Abingdon does not allow them to sell groceries. A search of the Walmart deeds back to about 1974 did not turn up such a restriction; however, another property in the business park does carry a no-grocery restriction but it is located across Constant Friendship Blvd from Walmart and is south of Arundel Court.
NEWS
April 13, 2012
The Sun ("A silver lining," April 12) and Sen. Jim Rosapepe ("Put transportation to voters," April 12) turn a blind eye to the truth about the true cause of shortfalls in the state's Transportation Trust Fund. Marylanders do not believe their false claims that a higher sales tax or gas tax will reduce traffic congestion. Traffic congestion is caused by too many cars and too little traffic flow, either from accidents or lane closures. The Sun would have you believe that the poor do not have cars and that the middle class, a group that seems to be everyday growing in definition, can absorb any tax dreamed by this administration.
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