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Traffic Cameras

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Staff Reports, The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2014
As of 9:10 a.m., the Maryland Department of Transportation is reporting that an earlier reported accident at the inner loop of the beltway and I-795 has been cleared, and traffic cameras are showing smooth flow through the Liberty Road area toward the ramps. Elsewhere, the rush hour seems to be winding down, with volumes decreasing in most areas. The Maryland Transit Administration reported minor light rail delays, with buses and MARC trains on time.
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NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
Traffic camera giant Redflex has been lobbying the Rawlings-Blake administration and City Council to take over Baltimore's once-lucrative speed and red-light camera network - stressing that it should not be judged by an unfolding scandal in Chicago in which a former executive is charged with bribery. The Arizona-based firm ran Chicago's red-light cameras for a decade, generating $500 million in revenue, but lost the work last year amid city and federal investigations. Officials in Baltimore said Thursday that the company, which was once a finalist to run this city's system, has used the recent talks to distance itself from the Chicago indictments.
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NEWS
December 25, 2012
Snow, sleet and rain on Christmas Eve made roads slick in parts of the Baltimore area where officials temporarily shut parts of I-83 Christmas morning in the city. I-83 was reopened in the city before 10:30 a.m. Tuesday, police said, and traffic cameras showed light traffic. The National Weather Service issued a dense fog advisory shortly before 9 a.m. Tuesday for Northern Baltimore, Carroll, Frederick Harford, Howard and Washington counties. The agency cautioned that until noon, visibility could be less than one-quarter mile in spots, and suggested that motorists use low-beam headlights and leave plenty of distance between vehicles.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2014
The State Highway Administration will spend nearly $15 million in the next six years to expand overnight patrols and increase the number of traffic cameras operating along major highways across the state. The changes will enable quicker assistance to drivers who become stranded or are involved in accidents, decreasing the impact on traffic, SHA Administrator Melinda Peters said Tuesday. "What we found is, if we can clear an overnight incident prior to rush hour, it makes a huge difference for people commuting," Peters said.
NEWS
July 2, 2012
Apparently, we continue to have a big problem with traffic cameras ("Speed cameras vs. vandals," June 28). The most interesting comment I read was about drivers (presumably caught) complaining about not seeing the camera. Well, how awful. A driver expected to be able to speed through a school zone without getting caught. Talk about missing the point. Baltimore is trying to get by with reduced personnel and still deliver all the services its' citizens expect. One of those services is having the police catch bad guys, some of whom are speeders.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2014
The State Highway Administration will spend nearly $15 million in the next six years to expand overnight patrols and increase the number of traffic cameras operating along major highways across the state. The changes will enable quicker assistance to drivers who become stranded or are involved in accidents, decreasing the impact on traffic, SHA Administrator Melinda Peters said Tuesday. "What we found is, if we can clear an overnight incident prior to rush hour, it makes a huge difference for people commuting," Peters said.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2010
The westbound Bay Bridge has reopened after being closed for about an hour as a result of a crash involving a tractor-trailer and a Corvette. The accident happened at 4:52 p.m. when a tractor-trailer ran into the rear of the Corvette, said Sgt. Jonathan Green, spokesman for the Maryland Transportation Authority Police. He said the driver of the Corvette suffered non-life-threatening injuries but was taken by Medevac helicopter to Maryland Shock Trauma. As of just after 6 p.m., Green said one westbound lane had been reopened and that the others were expected to be cleared shortly.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2013
As the region prepares for possible inclement weather during the Thanksgiving and Hanukkah holidays, the State Highway Administration unveiled a beefed-up arsenal Tuesday for tracking and battling winter storms. SHA spokeswoman Valerie Burnette Edgar said the administration has about 2,400 pieces of equipment available this season to fight storms, including two double-winged snowplows added this year. The two plows, each with a front blade and two side blades, cost about $200,000 apiece, and the SHA now has three in its fleet, Edgar said.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance | March 21, 2010
- Baltimore was still digging out from the first blizzard last month when the second one struck. A foot and a half of new snow clogged highways across the state. Scores of motorists were trapped by conditions that forced plow crews off the roads. For a time, not even wreckers or the State Highway Administration's rescue trucks could reach them. But while the travelers sat stranded, 53 disabled vehicles remained in view on dozens of highway traffic cameras, or as flashing icons on computer screens.
NEWS
September 15, 2012
It is most amusing to see the controversy surrounding speed cameras and the revenue they generate ("Speeding drivers get the blame," Sept. 13). I wonder what we tell our children sitting in the back seat. When they say, "Daddy, why are you speeding?" do we explain that "Daddy doesn't have to obey the laws," or do we say "Because almost everybody else is doing it too?" We claim to be a democratic country, and as such we elect officials to administer highway construction and safety enforcement on the public streets.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2014
The battle between birds and bureaucrats is over — and both sides won. With a helping hand from a state carpenter, an osprey couple finally got a home with a view of the water on the eastern end of the Chesapeake Bay Bridge. And the Maryland Transportation Authority, which manages the toll facility, finally got the pesky birds to stop nesting in front of cameras that keep an eye on traffic on busy U.S. 50 below. It's a happy ending to a story that has gone viral over the last several days, generating buzz on social media and even attracting the attention of CNN and Fox News.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2014
In the contest between bird and traffic camera, it's a question of which will blink first. A persistent osprey - likely in league with a mate - has been trying since late last week to build a nest smack dab in front of a traffic cam keeping watch on the eastbound U.S. 50 approach to the Bay Bridge. The Maryland Transportation Authority has removed the nest three times, only to have the determined bird or birds return. Late Tuesday afternoon, a branch - possibly the beginnings of another nest - could be seen in front of the camera, lying on the steel gantry over the highway.
NEWS
Staff Reports, The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2014
As of 9:10 a.m., the Maryland Department of Transportation is reporting that an earlier reported accident at the inner loop of the beltway and I-795 has been cleared, and traffic cameras are showing smooth flow through the Liberty Road area toward the ramps. Elsewhere, the rush hour seems to be winding down, with volumes decreasing in most areas. The Maryland Transit Administration reported minor light rail delays, with buses and MARC trains on time.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2013
As the region prepares for possible inclement weather during the Thanksgiving and Hanukkah holidays, the State Highway Administration unveiled a beefed-up arsenal Tuesday for tracking and battling winter storms. SHA spokeswoman Valerie Burnette Edgar said the administration has about 2,400 pieces of equipment available this season to fight storms, including two double-winged snowplows added this year. The two plows, each with a front blade and two side blades, cost about $200,000 apiece, and the SHA now has three in its fleet, Edgar said.
NEWS
December 25, 2012
Snow, sleet and rain on Christmas Eve made roads slick in parts of the Baltimore area where officials temporarily shut parts of I-83 Christmas morning in the city. I-83 was reopened in the city before 10:30 a.m. Tuesday, police said, and traffic cameras showed light traffic. The National Weather Service issued a dense fog advisory shortly before 9 a.m. Tuesday for Northern Baltimore, Carroll, Frederick Harford, Howard and Washington counties. The agency cautioned that until noon, visibility could be less than one-quarter mile in spots, and suggested that motorists use low-beam headlights and leave plenty of distance between vehicles.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2012
Whose traffic camera system is bigger? D.C. or Baltimore's? In the Baltimore Sun's speed camera investigation published Sunday, Xerox State & Local Solutions, Baltimore's speed camera vendor, called the city's automated traffic enforcement system the largest in North America. That figure included both red light and speed cameras. The next morning, the mayor's office challenged that claim and sent out a news release comparing Baltimore's cameras with the District's. It did not send the release to the Sun reporters who had authored the article.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | February 1, 2011
It's a widely held assumption, true or not, that cops give other cops breaks on traffic infractions. A quick flash of the badge, a union sticker on the bumper, a patch on the dashboard are the same as a wink and a nod, and a look the other way. But the growing number of cameras set up to catch speeders and red-light runners in Baltimore and elsewhere has become the great equalizer for traffic scofflaws — unbiased enforcers of bad driving habits....
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Sun Staff Writer | August 23, 1994
Maryland's war on highway congestion is about to go high tech with cameras and radar keeping vigil on the worst battlegrounds.A multimillion-dollar venture under way by the State Highway Administration will feature 22 video cameras focused on the Baltimore- Washington area's busiest interchanges. Add to that the 154 low-power radar units that will allow a computer to track how fast vehicles are moving along 115 miles of highways. The equipment isn't intended to enforce laws or ticket speeders, but to lay waste to a craftier enemy: urban gridlock.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2012
Baltimore broke ties with its longstanding red-light and speed-camera operator Wednesday, awarding a multimillion-dollar contract to a Hanover-based company that has served smaller cities. The Board of Estimates voted 4-1 to give the contract to Brekford Corp., which has run the speed camera system in Laurel, among other places. The action came over the protests of the company that has operated the cameras in Baltimore since 1999, bringing in $140 million in revenue. "If you don't like my client, do it the right way," said Robert Dashiell, an attorney for Xerox State & Local Solutions Inc., formerly called ACS State & Local Solutions, the longtime operator.
NEWS
September 15, 2012
It is most amusing to see the controversy surrounding speed cameras and the revenue they generate ("Speeding drivers get the blame," Sept. 13). I wonder what we tell our children sitting in the back seat. When they say, "Daddy, why are you speeding?" do we explain that "Daddy doesn't have to obey the laws," or do we say "Because almost everybody else is doing it too?" We claim to be a democratic country, and as such we elect officials to administer highway construction and safety enforcement on the public streets.
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