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Traffic Calming

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NEWS
By Jody K. Vilschick and Jody K. Vilschick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 24, 2005
LIKE MANY other neighborhoods in Howard County, Waverly Woods is concerned about motorists speeding through the community. Shannon Gillen, a community manager for First Real Estate Management, is excited about the innovative approach to traffic calming that the Waverly Woods homeowners association will try out soon. "Installing bike lanes is a great alternative to the traditional traffic humps and other measures that usually go in," she said. The bicycle lanes will be marked with lines, rather than a physical structure, but according to information she has obtained, lines are just as effective as other traffic-calming structures, such as chokers or speed humps, and a lot less expensive to maintain.
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NEWS
March 3, 2013
A stretch of Seven Courts Drive in Perry Hall where a local resident was killed in 2012 will be reconstructed this spring an effort to slow traffic and improve safety. County Councilman David Marks, whose 5th District includes Perry Hall, announced the project Feb. 13 by the county Department of Public Works. He said the $10,000 project should be finished by Memorial Day. Plans call for installing a brick island with pedestrian crossing on the road between the Seven Oaks Senior Center and Seven Oaks Elementary School.
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NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | May 11, 2003
A plan approved last week to tackle the problem of excessive traffic on Baltimore County's residential streets is likely to disappoint more people than it satisfies in the short term, officials acknowledge, because the county has limited funds for it and a desire to avoid the backlash that has accompanied traffic calming elsewhere. The county's Department of Public Works has a list of more than 80 streets from one end of the county to the other where residents have sought traffic calming, and that's just the places where people have known where to send requests.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,Sun reporter | December 30, 2007
Sue Dailey calls Moorgate Road the Indianapolis 500. Cars whiz through her Dundalk neighborhood, building speed on the wide roads and ignoring stop signs, Dailey says. She and others in the Eastfield Stanbrook Civic Association collected signatures of neighbors who agreed that speed bumps or other road modifications, such as concrete islands, were needed. They asked Baltimore County officials to look at possible solutions. But when traffic engineers came to study the problem, they determined that the street did not qualify for the "neighborhood traffic-calming program."
NEWS
May 22, 1995
From the community that brought you such imaginative street names as Gray Owl Garth, The Bowl and Rain Dream Hill, Columbia now introduces a catchy little traffic sign: "Traffic Calming Ahead."The blue rectangular sign appears twice within a half-mile in Columbia's Longfellow neighborhood. Luckily, a traditional yellow sign was below it -- a depiction of road bumps and the word "humps" -- or else we'd still be trying to figure what to do."Traffic Calming Ahead" means drivers should be aware of a change in the "geometry" in the road surface, explained Edward Walter, chief of traffic engineering for Howard County.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 14, 1997
MIDDLEBURG, Va. - It is an area known around the world as the home to wealthy people, successful horse breeders, even Academy Award-winning actors. But never mind those pampered few, say mere mortals of the area like Margaret Hawes, who runs the Little Apple Pastry Shop in the neighboring town of Aldie."
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | November 13, 2001
Facing a lack of clear guidelines, the Baltimore County Council is seeking countywide standards for installing "traffic-calming devices," the often contentious mechanisms used to slow cars in residential neighborhoods. Traffic calming is probably the No. 1 request of community groups throughout the county, councilmen and neighborhood leaders say, but the county's response has been haphazard and community reaction mixed. On Newburg Avenue in Catonsville in 1996, a group of residents began studying ways to slow down cars.
NEWS
By Jamal E. Watson and Jamal E. Watson,SUN STAFF | April 22, 1999
Alarmed by an increase in speeding throughout their neighborhood, some residents of Savage have asked Howard County authorities to install traffic-calming devices.Last week, several dozen residents met with a Department of Public Works official to solicit assistance in developing a funding proposal to present to the Howard County Council. They say motorists have been speeding on two streets in particular: Baltimore Avenue and Savage Guilford Road, where Bollman Bridge Elementary School, Patuxent Valley Middle School and Bethel Christian Academy are located.
NEWS
By JOHN FRITZE and JOHN FRITZE,SUN REPORTER | December 9, 2005
Days after Baltimore officials unveiled a proposal to speed up traffic, a Northeast City Council member has introduced a measure to slow it back down. Councilwoman Mary Pat Clarke filed a resolution yesterday that would create a task force charged with adopting "traffic calming" policies for residential areas. The idea, she said, is to slow down traffic through neighborhoods. The task force would be charged with making recommendations about how the city could streamline the process neighborhoods must follow to request speed bumps, bring in police to direct traffic or make roads narrower.
NEWS
By Jody K. Vilschick and Jody K. Vilschick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 27, 2005
DO CARS and SUVs zoom by your home, threatening life and limb? Have you ever wondered how to get some traffic calming installed? Jill Balthis, who lives on a street that has speed humps, wants more of the same. But she wondered how to start. "Does it really take the approval of the county executive to get a speed hump put in a road?" she asked. "There are many small children further down the street, and we still get people speeding by the houses. Is there anything that can be done since the humps are already on part of the road?"
NEWS
July 31, 2007
INSIDE TODAY WHAT THEY'RE SAYING TODAY'S SUN COLUMNISTS Seaside turns somber Yesterday, some vacationers headed to Ocean City's latest and most unlikely attraction, the home of Christy Freeman, arrested in connection with the death of an infant, one of four whose remains have been found in and around her house. Maryland baltimoresun.com/marbella Customer service saves Good customer service is the lifeblood of any business, whether it be the mom-and-pop store on the corner or the big box down the street.
NEWS
By John Fritze and John Fritze,Sun Reporter | February 21, 2007
Baltimore Mayor Sheila Dixon named a task force yesterday to study ways to slow traffic in residential areas and near schools - part of a "traffic calming" effort that has become popular in other cities around the country. The task force, first suggested by Baltimore City Councilwoman Mary Pat Clarke last year, will look at ways to reduce speed on certain streets. Typical traffic-calming methods include speed bumps, narrowed roads and traffic circles. Similar traffic-calming initiatives have been used in cities across the country, most notably in Portland, Ore., and Cambridge, Mass.
NEWS
By JOHN FRITZE and JOHN FRITZE,SUN REPORTER | December 9, 2005
Days after Baltimore officials unveiled a proposal to speed up traffic, a Northeast City Council member has introduced a measure to slow it back down. Councilwoman Mary Pat Clarke filed a resolution yesterday that would create a task force charged with adopting "traffic calming" policies for residential areas. The idea, she said, is to slow down traffic through neighborhoods. The task force would be charged with making recommendations about how the city could streamline the process neighborhoods must follow to request speed bumps, bring in police to direct traffic or make roads narrower.
NEWS
By Jody K. Vilschick and Jody K. Vilschick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 24, 2005
LIKE MANY other neighborhoods in Howard County, Waverly Woods is concerned about motorists speeding through the community. Shannon Gillen, a community manager for First Real Estate Management, is excited about the innovative approach to traffic calming that the Waverly Woods homeowners association will try out soon. "Installing bike lanes is a great alternative to the traditional traffic humps and other measures that usually go in," she said. The bicycle lanes will be marked with lines, rather than a physical structure, but according to information she has obtained, lines are just as effective as other traffic-calming structures, such as chokers or speed humps, and a lot less expensive to maintain.
NEWS
By Jody K. Vilschick and Jody K. Vilschick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 6, 2005
SOME PEOPLE are fans of traffic-calming measures, and some are not. Susan Gold, who lives on Wilde Lake village's West Running Brook Road, where traffic-calming measures such as road narrowing and traffic circles have been installed, falls into the latter category. "There have been serious accidents all along West Running Brook Road since the installation of the traffic circles. Cars can go out of control and up on lawns and driveways. "At our intersection alone, we have had three major crashes with cars trying to maneuver the circles," she said, noting that two cars crashed into nearby light poles, and one struck a tree.
NEWS
By Jody K. Vilschick and Jody K. Vilschick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 27, 2005
DO CARS and SUVs zoom by your home, threatening life and limb? Have you ever wondered how to get some traffic calming installed? Jill Balthis, who lives on a street that has speed humps, wants more of the same. But she wondered how to start. "Does it really take the approval of the county executive to get a speed hump put in a road?" she asked. "There are many small children further down the street, and we still get people speeding by the houses. Is there anything that can be done since the humps are already on part of the road?"
NEWS
By Jody K. Vilschick and Jody K. Vilschick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 6, 2005
SOME PEOPLE are fans of traffic-calming measures, and some are not. Susan Gold, who lives on Wilde Lake village's West Running Brook Road, where traffic-calming measures such as road narrowing and traffic circles have been installed, falls into the latter category. "There have been serious accidents all along West Running Brook Road since the installation of the traffic circles. Cars can go out of control and up on lawns and driveways. "At our intersection alone, we have had three major crashes with cars trying to maneuver the circles," she said, noting that two cars crashed into nearby light poles, and one struck a tree.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | September 10, 1998
Monroe Avenue in Eldersburg, the site of a double fatality in June, will get relief from traffic woes with striping to delineate lanes and speed bumps to deter lead-foot motorists.The County Commissioners -- one of whom lives on Monroe -- debated options for nearly an hour yesterday before voting 2-1 to install four speed bumps and to paint center and curb lines on the road. Cost of work on the street, which motorists use as a quick route from congestion on Liberty Road, will be about $8,000.
NEWS
October 16, 2003
Speed humps could prevent traffic tragedies One answer to John Barry's question, "Gittings and Lake avenues are busy east-west thoroughfares. What did you expect when you bought a house there?" is that we expected that motorists would drive at speeds reasonably close to the posted speed limit ("Negotiating city speed humps is an increasingly bumpy road," Oct. 7). Speed limit signs for 25 miles per hour are posted all along East Lake Avenue. Yet motorists routinely travel 40 mph to 45 mph during the daytime.
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